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» » Lonely Planet Seoul (City Guide)
Lonely Planet Seoul (City Guide) e-book

Author:

Martin Robinson

Language:

English

Category:

Travel

Subcategory:

Asia

ePub size:

1966 kb

Other formats:

doc mobi azw mbr

Rating:

4.5

Publisher:

Lonely Planet; 5 edition (June 1, 2006)

Pages:

218

ISBN:

1740598466

Lonely Planet Seoul (City Guide) e-book

by Martin Robinson


Lonely Planet Seoul is poorly organized and riddled with inaccuracies; unfortunately it is the only comprehensive, recent Seoul guide (in English) on the market.

Lonely Planet Seoul is poorly organized and riddled with inaccuracies; unfortunately it is the only comprehensive, recent Seoul guide (in English) on the market. I used the book to get an overview of Seoul, but shockingly, found the tourist information office maps and guides more useful and accurate.

Washington DC city guide - Lonely Planet travel video - Продолжительность: 2:53 Lonely . Séoul Corée du Sud TOP 20 des choses à faire - Продолжительность: 6:35 Laurent Caccia Recommended for you. 6:35. 1000$ за выходные в Uber легко.

Washington DC city guide - Lonely Planet travel video - Продолжительность: 2:53 Lonely Planet Recommended for you. 2:53. Adventures in Seoul, Korea - Продолжительность: 11:21 turnoffthelite Recommended for you. 11:21.

Lonely Planet Seoul book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Lonely Planet Seoul: City Guide as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Discover SeoulFind out how eating with chopsticks made of metal.

Lonely Planet: The world’s number one travel guide publisher Lonely Planet’s Seoul is your passport to the .

Lonely Planet: The world’s number one travel guide publisher Lonely Planet’s Seoul is your passport to the most relevant, up-to-date advice on what to see and skip, and what hidden discoveries await you. Walk along the long-buried Cheonggyecheon stream, wander the labyrinthine streets of Bukchon Hanok Village and try some lip-smacking local cuisine at Gwangjang Market – all with your trusted travel companion.

Items related to Seoul (City Travel Guide). Book Description Lonely Planet, 2009. Martin Robinson; Jason Zahorchak Seoul (City Travel Guide). ISBN 13: 9781741047745. Who We Are At Lonely Planet, we see our job as inspiring and enabling travellers to connect with the world for their own benefit and for the benefit of the world at large.

Author: Martin Robinson,Ray Bartlett,Rob Whyte ISBN 10: 1741045584. Title: Lonely Planet Korea (Country Guide) Item Condition: used item in a very good condition. Publisher: Lonely Planet ISBN 13: 9781741045581. Lonely Planet Korea Travel Survival Kit: Korea by Ray Bartlett, Martin Robinson, Rob Whyte and Lonely Planet Publications Staff (2007, Paperback, Revised). 1 оценка товараОб этом товаре.

Please provide me with your latest book news, views and details of Waterstones’ special offers.

Lonely planet's guide to Seoul offers great ideas for things to do and see whilst planning an itinerary. Please provide me with your latest book news, views and details of Waterstones’ special offers.

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Experience Seoul, Asia’s most intriguing city. Tour the grand royal palaces. Sing yourself hoarse in a noraebang (karaoke room). Stuff yourself with hearty beef and vegetable bibimbap. Indulge in exquisite traditional tea shops. This authoritative, bestselling guidebook will take you to the heart of Korea’s captivating capital.Eliminate The Guesswork – opinionated hotel reviews make the decisions easy.Shop Your Socks Off – reviews and tips take you to the city’s best traditional markets, glitzy malls, boutiques and galleries.Discover the DMZ (Demilitarized Zone) – we take you on a once-in-a-lifetime trip to the formidable and fascinating North–South border.Feast Like A King – eating reviews serve up the city’s finest Korean fare, from spicy tofu and barbeque to Korean fusion and Hanjeongsik banquets.Navigate through nameless streets with our clear and detailed maps – complete with hangeul (Korean script).
Shaktiktilar
For me one of the best travel guides is Lonely PLanet, and I found this one at an excellent price.
Moogugore
Needs some update on places to go and to see.
here is ten more word need to complete the survey
Windworker
I've been in Seoul for over a month and have used this guide to see most of the sights and to find my way around. I've been very satisfied with it. Seoul is an extremely difficult city to navigate, and this book helps get around. The maps could be a bit more user friendly, but in general they are helpful and the descriptions of the tourist sights have been accurate. Since I have an apartment here, I can't speak to the hotel recommendations. I was surprised to see all the negative reviews already posted, but perhaps the new edition (which is what I am using) is better than previosu editions.
Honeirsil
Great book! Very informative and very helpful. Definitely taking it with me to the city to use. It is small and convenient for packing and carrying.
Thordira
Like many other disappointed reviewers of the Seoul Lonely Planet guide, I'm an avid fan of the series. But the Seoul guide is without a doubt the very worst I have encountered. It's not just useless, as many of the other reviewers have said; buying it is not only a waste of money. It's also a waste of time and can actually, by failing to mention some important pitfalls of travel in South Korea, cause considerable difficulty.

The Guide buys into the cliché that South Korea is an economic and technological powerhouse. This is, of course, true but one would assume, therefore, that it would be easy to get cash from an ATM machine, as one can in even considerably less developed countries. The Seoul LP does not mention that the large majority of the ATM machines in Seoul take only Korean cards; a few take US credit cards, but not European credit cards or any sort of bank card. Only a very, very few will take a bank card. So you have to make sure you locate the machine that will take your card, and have enough cash on hand to use until you can make it back to your machine. The Seoul guide is totally silent on this matter.

I neglected to rent a cell phone at the airport upon arrival, not having been informed by my LP Guide that a prepaid SIM card is impossible to buy in Korea. Prepaid SIM cards are available the world over, even in the most remote places, but the writers of the Seoul LP Guide didn't think that it was important to tell its readers that it was advisable to rent a cell phone at the airport, since contrary to justifiable expectations, prepaid cards are not available in South Korea. Because of this omission on the authors' part, I incurred astronomical roaming charges.

Also, maps are inaccurate, restaurants are impossible to find because of inexact or non existent addresses or location indications. Many of the listed restaurants have their name on the street sign in the Korean script (Hangul), which the authors don't see fit to give you. Hence, finding them is impossible. That is, of course, providing that the restaurants are still there and haven't closed. Although this is supposedly a new edition, many of the entries are seriously outdated. Also, it gives you the impression that Seoul is a moderately priced city; Seoul is, in fact, one of the most expensive cities in Asia, and competes with places like Venice (where I live) for outlandish restaurant prices.

Seoul is a difficult city to negotiate, and Korean culture is complex and frequently puzzling. The Lonely Planet guide only adds to the confusion.
Wenaiand
Lonely Planet Seoul is poorly organized and riddled with inaccuracies; unfortunately it is the only comprehensive, recent Seoul guide (in English) on the market. I used the book to get an overview of Seoul, but shockingly, found the tourist information office maps and guides more useful and accurate. The website Seoul Style offers much more interesting eating, entertainment, and shopping suggestions, but very occasionally I'll refer to the Lonely Planet for further ideas.

The book ought to be organized by neighborhood rather than subject; it's aggravating to visit an area of Seoul and flip between different chapters, looking for the two inches of print on a given activity in a particular area. Other Lonely Planet and Fodor's guides usually integrate all suggestions by neighborhood and accurately portray those suggestions onto maps. One can get an overview of the different areas when the descriptions are integrated, especially if the author writes an introductory paragraph about a neighborhood's feel; to Robinson, it seems that places are just places, with no 'there' there. In reality, each area of Seoul does have a unique feel and meaning.

In the LP Seoul guide, the maps' numbered descriptions are often mis-categorized (e.g., under 'Shopping' the author suggests the bookstore Seoul Selection, but when you look for the location on the map, it is listed under 'Entertainment'; when poring through dozens of suggestions in tiny font, it is frustrating to check all the categories to compensate for his carelessness). The layout and selection of maps in general is mediocre, and leave little sense of the scale or organization of Seoul; for instance, Robinson devotes two pages of maps to Jamsil to depict just a few activities, and leaves the bottom half of those two pages devoid of suggestion, but gives the large, very happening area of Gangnam / Apjugong just one page. Adjacent Cheongdam, which a favorite hangout for younger Koreans and in 'feel' and location is much closer to Apjugong, he places on the Jamsil map, but doesn't provide any activities.

The transliteration between Hangul and English is frequently bizarre, which makes it difficult to decipher the names of neighborhoods and places. It is better to use the Tourist Maps (in other cities I've never relied on tourist maps, but Seoul is different), for the transliteration and neighborhood names are more commonly understood by Koreans. His language guide is also transliterated ineffectually; a traveler trying to follow his phonetics would never be understood by a Korean. For vowels pronounced 'e' he writes 'i'; the number 1 is correctly pronounced like eel; he writes 'il', which is perfect if he means the French pronunciation of 'il'; same for 2: pronounced e, he writes i - again, great for French, but he's transliterating to English, so it's wrong.

LP Seoul needs to be rewritten by a very organized, clear thinker who possesses a current understanding of Seoul and Hangul-English translation, yet who recalls the needs of a first-time visitor to this dynamic city.

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