ComicsChildrenHumorFitnessReferenceITLawCookingHobbiesTeachingSelf-HelpPhotoFantasyHistoryTestsCalendarsFictionLGBTTeenagersTransportMemorisMedicineMysteryRelationshipsPoliticsBusinessSpiritualityRomanceBiblesMathSportTravelOtherNo category
» » The Grand Prix Motorcycle: The Official Technical History
The Grand Prix Motorcycle: The Official Technical History e-book

Author:

Foreword by Kenny Roberts Sr,Kevin Cameron

Language:

English

Category:

Transport

Subcategory:

Automotive

ePub size:

1224 kb

Other formats:

azw rtf mbr lit

Rating:

4.9

Publisher:

David Bull Publishing (March 31, 2009)

Pages:

216

ISBN:

1935007017

The Grand Prix Motorcycle: The Official Technical History e-book

by Foreword by Kenny Roberts Sr,Kevin Cameron


Cameron never intended to be a writer

Cameron never intended to be a writer. To hasten recovery from higher education, he began building and tuning racing motorcycles in 1964, becoming a two-stroke partisan with a 250cc Yamaha TD1-B as that revolution gathered strength.

by Kenny Roberts Sr. and Kevin Cameron. Classic Motorcycle Race Engines: Expert Technical Analysis of the World's Great Power Units. This is the story of how top-class racing motorcycles have evolved, year by year, from the beginning of the FIM World Championships in 1949 to the present. Each year?s machine is described in a short essay with an accompanying data panel, and there are 14 longer essays on the various ?eras of design? in championship racing.

Kevin Cameron (2013). Foreword by Erik Buell. The Grand Prix Motorcycle: The Official History. David Bull Publishing. Gorr, Eric; Cameron, Kevin (2011). Four-Stroke Motocross and Off-Road Motorcycle Performance Handbook. Kevin Cameron (2009). Kevin Cameron (2007). Top Dead Center: The Best of Kevin Cameron from Cycle World Magazine. Kevin Cameron (2005).

The Grand Prix Motorcycle book. Told with style and great technical insight by acclaimed author. Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. Told with style and great technical insight by acclaimed author Kevin Cameron, this is the development history of 500cc and MotoGP road-racing motorcycles from 1949 to the present day.

Cameron never intended to be a writer

Cameron never intended to be a writer.

Kevin Cameron, who most of you know from his many Cycle World and earlier Cycle articles, covers the entire history from the perspective of someone with a deep technical understanding of the motorcycles who enjoys telling us what he knows. It's striking how, in the early years, MV Agusta dominated the series, with a first win in 1956, then after Gilera won in 1957, MV Agusta returned with an uninterrupted series of championships from 1958 through 1974!

Find nearly any book by Foreword by Kenny Roberts Sr. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers.

Find nearly any book by Foreword by Kenny Roberts Sr. Founded in 1997, BookFinder. Coauthors & Alternates. Learn More at LibraryThing.

The Grand Prix Motorcycle. The Official Technical History. Title: The Grand Prix Motorcycle The Official Technical History. Author: Kevin Cameron. We are aware of 3 similar reference publications related to "Moto GP". Moto GP Racer's Archive 2006.

The Grand Prix Motorcycle: The Official Technical History. Technical developments in each of the 60 years described in detail. Kevin C. Cameron, Pepe Burgaleta, Kenny Roberts. Lavish full-colour presentation featuring high-quality artwork of each year's premier-class World Champion motorcycle.

This is the story of how top-class racing motorcycles have evolved, year by year, from the beginning of the FIM World Championships in 1949 to the present. Each year s championship-winning machine is described in a short essay with an accompanying data panel, and there are 14 longer essays on the various eras of design in championship racing. The essays create a narrative that brings together the many and ever-evolving influences of engine design, materials, tires, and chassis to reveal what technology has provided to help riders win races.

Told with style and great technical insight by acclaimed author Kevin Cameron, this is the development history of 500cc and MotoGP road-racing motorcycles from 1949 to the present day. It can be read as separate chapters, or as a connected narrative of the evolution of the engines, chassis, brakes, and tires used in World Championship racing. Intense competition, rapidly changing technology, and input from the world s best riders all contributed to the important design choices that ultimately led to today s MotoGP bikes and to the closely similar modern production sportbikes.

Power, weight, and aerodynamics are critical performance areas in all forms of motorsport, but the racing motorcycle must have a unique degree of drivability and balance. Power is usable only if the rider can accurately control it. Increased tire grip is useless if it supplies no cues to let the rider know the limit is near. Above all, the bike must act as an extension of the rider s style and senses.

This interaction makes the rider an inherent part of the design and engineering of the motorcycle. The process can be seen at work in the garages after every race practice. The rider talks with the crew chief and the data technician, whose laptops are open. They discuss what can be done to be quicker at key points around the circuit. Successful solutions become the subject of engineering meetings at the factory, and may immediately return as updated parts, or be incorporated as an element of next season s machine.

Unlike Formula One cars, which have little in common with road cars, either technically or visually, MotoGP motorcycles are not greatly different from everyday production sportbikes. They use virtually all the same technologies as their production counterparts, and closely resemble them. What s learned in this year s racing season affects the design of next year s production bikes. This continual process of evolution the result of improvements born of pragmatic problem solving at the track and in the race shop has created the procession of modern motorcycles depicted in this book.

Told with style and great technical insight by acclaimed author Kevin Cameron, this is the development history of 500cc and MotoGP road-racing motorcycles from 1949 to the present day. It can be read as separate chapters, or as a connected narrative of the evolution of the engines, chassis, brakes, and tires used in World Championship racing. Intense competition, rapidly changing technology, and input from the world s best riders all contributed to the important design choices that ultimately led to today s MotoGP bikes and to the closely similar modern production sportbikes.

Frosha
The Grand Prix Motorcycle sets out to explain the evolution of two-wheeled Grand Prix racers from the origin of the World Championship series in 1949 to the present day. This is quite a task for a single book and single writer, but if anyone is up to the task it is journalist Kevin Cameron. He is one of the few motoring journalists who understands and can explain the technical developments that caused top flight racing motorcycles to evolve from simple post-war single cylinder bikes that boasted all of fifty horsepower and struggled to reach 120 miles an hour to the compact earth-bound rockets we know today, with more that two hundred horsepower and top speeds well over 200 miles an hour.

Cameron is an editor at the venerable Cycle World and one of the world's pre-eminent motorcycle journalists. He has a deep background with motorcycles and has not only wridden and tested hundreds of bikes but he has also been in the trenches of competition as a builder and tuner of road racing motorcycles. Along with Cook Neilson and Phil Schilling, he was part of the editorial staff at the legendary Cycle Magazine during the era when that publication was the best written, most irreverent and highest circulation American motorcycle publication.
The Grand Prix Motorcycle consists of introductory essays that divide the different eras of post-war motorcycle development and explain the main currents of frame, engine and tire evolution that made improvements in acceleration, braking and cornering possible. This is where Cameron is at his best ... in explaining the development of the two stroke engine through expansion chamber technology or the evolution of frame design from a jumble of small tubes to a more rigid structure of larger, straighter tubes and then, finally to the monocoque construction of today. Following these short essays is a single page summary for each year of Grand Prix competition and a facing page that features technical specifications and a color illustration of the championship motorcycle by the Spanish journalist and artist Pepe Burgaleta.

The rigid editorial format of The Grand Prix Motorcycle is problematic, for in many cases the motorcycle that won the championship in a one year was virtually identical to or a small step away from the one that reigned the year before. So, the technophile-friendly format quickly becomes repetitive. The emphasis on the technical also seems to de-emphasize the role of the rider, as on some occasions in Grand Prix history a superior rider won the championship on an inferior motorcycle. In motorsports, it takes two to tango, a man and a machine. Additionally, the most interesting racers can be ones that were less developed but conceptually ahead of their time or even evolutionary dead-ends.

The format of the book is what makes it somewhat disappointing and what may have been a much more readable narrative transcript become choppy and disjointed. Its always difficult to stick to reviewing the book in front of you rather than what could have been, but in this case, I would love to see a longer, or possibly two or three book series on this subject by the same writer, but in a conventional format with period illustrations, cutaways and technical illustrations, while retaining the clarity of Burgaleta's excellent color work.

The Grand Prix Motorcycle was designed as a souvenir guide to the world's fastest road racing motorcycles in conjunction with the Moto Grand Prix series, the current World Championship. It was clearly intended to be a compact and so it has a lot of ground to cover in 213 pages. While The Grand Prix Motorcycle is worth owning, it is the book's brevity, editing and the rigidity of the format that makes it a less than stellar achievement.
Siralune
Any reader interested in road racing's evolution since 1949, which has delivered the bikes we race and ride today, must acquire, read, learn from and refer to this brilliant work. It is not just the bible of MotoGP (`official licensed product'). It is much more. It implicitly explains the sport bikes evolved from MotoGP that race in all the other classes, and the high-performance machines we ride on the road. Reading and looking at this remarkable volume is like sitting at the feet of the master (Kevin Cameron is such) and seeing where we have come from and how we have progressed.

Cameron takes the design eras phase by phase, in chunks as small as two years and as large as seven, each year illustrated by an individual race bike--you know all the marques. He cites essentially every significant engineering advance and its immediate and long-term relevance, explaining not just what happened but what it meant then and what it means today. No aspect is overlooked, from frames to suspension, brakes to tires, materials to metallurgy, and including the vital human element: the rider who can make a great designer's race bike into a winner.

Each of the 14 chapters is preceded by a `positioning' essay and a photo of a world champion of the time, from Geoff Duke to Valentino Rossi. The side-view illustrations of the bikes stripped of bodywork, by Pepe Burgaleta, many covering full spreads, deliver a clarity and power that photos, with complex `plumbing' visible, cannot convey. Those photos belong in other books. A `time-line' below the lead illustrations and bulleted technical specifications shows the racing record of each machine. All the great bikes are there.

You need not be a gearhead to enjoy this book, though the rich technical detail is riveting and covered with the author's legendary skill of exposition. It is a project to set beside the armchair or next to the bed before calling it a day, to study and enjoy, to ruminate over. As one reads it, the immense energies, wills and inventiveness of the designers, mechanics and riders wash over the mind and heart: billions of dollars and thousands of lives, racing the world's great venues, dedicated to the miracle of track dominance that is at the heart of racing, captured on the page.

Kenny Roberts Sr.'s foreword is poignant, in that the great champion invested his heart, his mind and his fortune to build a great MotoGP, only to find his ambitions thwarted in the end. As he puts it: "Racing isn't a fairytale with a happy ending--it's a stream of problems, half-answers, and coping with the rest." One might also wish that Cameron had given us a glimpse into his crystal ball and predicted the future. With his accumulated wisdom and knowledge he would probably be right.

The only criticism I would level at the book is that it is somewhat overproduced, with black print on gold pages (hard to read) and a lot of reversed (i.e. harder to read) typography. Simpler is better but David Bull went over the top. It doesn't matter in the end. This is a truly great and epochal work.

e-Books related to The Grand Prix Motorcycle: The Official Technical History