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» » Uncle Montague's Tales of Terror
Uncle Montague's Tales of Terror e-book

Author:

Chris Priestley

Language:

English

Category:

Teenagers

ePub size:

1620 kb

Other formats:

mobi doc docx lrf

Rating:

4.4

Publisher:

Bloomsbury Childrens Books (2008)

Pages:

240

ISBN:

0747589216

Uncle Montague's Tales of Terror e-book

by Chris Priestley


This book is an anthology of ghost stories and cautionary tales, all told by the mysterious Uncle Montague to a rather dimwitted nephew, Edgar.

I also liked it the most. The formula used in the other volumes, with a central narrative tying all the other tales together, is at its best here. This book is an anthology of ghost stories and cautionary tales, all told by the mysterious Uncle Montague to a rather dimwitted nephew, Edgar. Most leave you with a crooked smile after finishing. Uncle Montague's home is filled with odd collectibles. An old brass telescope.

Illustrated by david roberts. Bloomsbury Publishing, London, Berlin and New York. First published in Great Britain 2007.

While the terror tales told by Uncle Montague to his nephew Edgar weren't spine tingling to me as an adult, they were all well . Winter Pruning" is one of the more twisted tales of Uncle Montague's. It's a very traditional child's story. There is an old blind witch that lives miserly at the top of a hill.

While the terror tales told by Uncle Montague to his nephew Edgar weren't spine tingling to me as an adult, they were all well written, and I can see how they could keep a younger (little?) person on the edge of his/her seat . questions that could easily prompt an out-of-the-book discussion.

As a complete collection, Uncle Montague’s Tales of Terror are wonderfully twisted and deviously dark gothic tales, indeed. Each story involves an object of interest and the story of the unfortunate child whose fate was tangled with that object – an impossibly intricate porcelain doll, a gilded frame, an engraved wooden demon, a telescope, and more. The true fun of Uncle Montague is the way in which all the stories are tied together by an overarching narrative – the story of young Edward and his Uncle’s strange house. Uncle Montague has a story all of his own, which is a delightfully chilling payoff after reading the other assorted tales of terror.

Next . Uncle Montague's Tales of Terror. Claim the "Uncle Montague's Tales of Terror.

Uncle Montague lives alone in a big house and his regular visits from his nephew give him the opportunity to relive some of the most frightening stories he knows. But as the stories unfold, a newer and more surprising narrative emerges, one that is perhaps the most frightening of all. Uncle Montague's Tales of Terror, it transpires, are not so much works of imagination as dreadful lurking memories. Memories of an earlier time in which Uncle Montague lived a very different life to his present solitary existence. Kids Adventures & Detectives

Uncle Montague lives alone in a big house and his regular visits from his nephew give him the opportunity to relive some of the most frightening stories he knows. This spine-tingling, thrill-packed novel has more than enough fear-factor for the most ardent fan of scary stories. Uncle Montague lives alone in a big house, but regular visits from his nephew, Edward, give him the opportunity to recount some of the most frightening stories he knows.

Автор: Priestley Chris Название: Uncle Montague& Tales of Terror Издательство: Bloomsbury Publishing PLC . Описание: The third spine-chilling title in the brilliantly received series of ghost stories by Chris Priestley.

Описание: The third spine-chilling title in the brilliantly received series of ghost stories by Chris Priestley. With a brand new story and an exciting commercial jacket treatment.

This book is about a boy called Edgar, Edgar loves visiting his uncle Montague who lives in a big house in. .

This book is about a boy called Edgar, Edgar loves visiting his uncle Montague who lives in a big house in the woods. When Edgar visits his uncle he only ever goes in one room. There is a mysterious housekeeper who Edgar had never seen, and footsteps and laughter echo the house even when both of them are sitting quietly. Edgar finds this all very strange but he finds the objects in the house so interesting; his uncle has boxes, statues, clocks, frames and pictures. As Edgar questions his uncle he learns the truth of the shadows and objects in the spooky old house.

Uncle Montague lives alone in a big house and his regular visits from his nephew give him the opportunity to relive some of the most frightening stories he knows. But as the stories unfold, a newer and more surprising narrative emerges, one that is perhaps the most frightening of all. "Uncle Montague's Tales of Terror", it transpires, are not so much works of imagination as dreadful lurking memories. Memories of an earlier time in which Uncle Montague lived a very different life to his present solitary existence.
Marilace
Admittedly, I purchased this book because it was $1.99 for the Kindle, and I was curious (and David Roberts' cover illustration drew me in).

While the terror tales told by Uncle Montague to his nephew Edgar weren't spine tingling to me as an adult, they were all well written, and I can see how they could keep a younger (little?) person on the edge of his/her seat. Many are written in such a way that a younger person would be full of "why?... how?... what?..." questions that could easily prompt an out-of-the-book discussion.

The ending was a welcome surprise, and it worked in that it explained the Montague/Edgar relationship in more depth as well as providing reasons and origins for the tales told by Montague.

The illustrations by Roberts are included in the Kindle edition and only add to the "classical" feel of the book.

While I am far from a child, Uncle Montague's Tales of Terror is a book I thoroughly enjoyed.
Dyni
Christopher Priestley's Uncle Montague's Tales of Terror is the kind of book that begs to be read aloud, with a British accent, and in the dark of night sitting next to a roaring fire while an unnatural storm brews outside. This book is an anthology of ghost stories and cautionary tales, all told by the mysterious Uncle Montague to a rather dimwitted nephew, Edgar. Most leave you with a crooked smile after finishing.

Uncle Montague's home is filled with odd collectibles. An old brass telescope. A gilt frame. A small Indian ink drawing that may or may not move. These and more all have a story to tell, and not a one of them is happy. In fact, the words "ghastly" and "terrible" came to mind more than once.

Uncle Montague tells Edward ten tales over the course of the evening. All take place within the frame of Edward and Montague reclining near a fire place in Montague's moody home. Noises break into the frame, setting the stage for something else that may exist outside of the stories. Most of the tales feature young children as their protagonists, and because of this, the horrifying aspects of Montague's tales is multiplied.

Enhancing the book and each story is illustrations in the style of Edward Gorey's Gashlycrumb Tinies. In fact, the stories read as if they were directly inspired and lifted from one of Gorey's panels. David Roberts, however, is the illustrator for the book, and his work is so memorable that I can scarcely think about Uncle Montague's Tales of Terror without thinking of the delightful illustrations.

It's hard to pick a favorite story here, as all were great for one reason or another. I particularly enjoyed the ones below.

"The Demon Bench End" is truly horrible. Young Thomas Haynes is not really a very good boy. For all appearances he is, but truthfully, he's just as bad as anyone else. After a fateful street side encounter with a tinker, Thomas's life forever changes. Largely neglected by his father, Thomas stands idly by while his father and the tinker haggle. Eventually the family parts from the riffraff, but Thomas does not forget what he saw. For the tinker had something Thomas wants terribly bad, and he'll stop at nothing to get it.

"Winter Pruning" is one of the more twisted tales of Uncle Montague's. It's a very traditional child's story. There is an old blind witch that lives miserly at the top of a hill. All day long Old Mother Tallow stands out in her yard pruning her trees, mending the apples. Simon Hawkins, another young rapscallion if ever there was one, decides to sneak into Old Mother Tallow's house one day while she's outside. The witch is supposed to be rich, after all, and he was sick of stealing pennies from his mother's purse. One big score would be all he'd need.

"A Ghost Story" was probably the most lighthearted of the tales, and that could be partially why I liked it so much. Little Victoria Harcourt begrudgingly attends a family wedding, a horrible affair where rain and wind ruins the day. Victoria is mostly scorned by the other girls, and when her most loathsome of cousins Emily begins telling a ghost story, Victoria is almost ready to abandon all pretense of wanting to fit in. I don't want to say much about this story, but I did enjoy it immensely. I smiled like a baboon at the end.

In the end, every story in Uncle Montague's Tales of Terror was exactly what I was looking for. While some are better than others, all are perversely wicked. One can't help but feel a trifle ashamed at the outcomes of these tales, for smiling at the often demise of children. Priestley's stories fit into the vein of the Brothers Grimm, though not as fantastical or folky. There are lessons to be learned beneath these stories, making it a perfect book for adolescents and teens. Even so, Priestley offered a memorable book that's quick to read and perfect for when the Halloween mood strikes. I'll be adding the other installments, Tales of Terror from the Black Ship and Tales of Terror from the Tunnel's Mouth, to my TBR now.
Weiehan
A long-time Gorey fan I was in initially drawn in by Gorey-esque illustration on the cover of this delightful book. I began to read it immediately after tearing open its packaging and settling myself on the sofa in front of the air conditioner (it was a very hot day). I was a little disappointed that the wind wasn't howling and that a thunderstorm didn't rage out of doors, as there's nothing better than atmosphere when one settles in for a scare. However, after I began reading and moved into the first of Uncle Montague's tales my sitting room fell away and I cared not a jot for my atmosphere; I only wanted to know more.

Uncle Montague's Tales of Terror is reminiscent of Poe and has a Victorian flavour about it, but is less coy than (let's say) Wilkie Collins and less horrific than Poe. It's a delicious balance that comes from good, modern storytelling, replete with eye-catching illustrations which complement the stories perfectly. While it is written for ages 8 and up, I do not believe the adults who have written here that they were not affected by these tales. Perhaps they weren't able to tap into the wide-eyed moppet we each hold inside. I for one was riveted, always wondering what secret's Uncle Montague was keeping, how he came to know these stories, and whether or not Edward would make it home through the dark woods at all. Often I'd find myself whispering, "Ohhhh noooo...." or making exclamations of horror as a shiver went down my spine. With the end came a certain sense of relief, and a lingering feeling of unease. Long after I finished the book I'd find myself thinking of a particular narrative or other, and I could feel my face pull into an expression of disquiet. Even now, thinking about Matthew...*shudder*

Altogether, a splendid book for folk of all ages who enjoy spending time in the shadows.

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