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» » Missing Pieces
Missing Pieces e-book

Author:

Norma Fox Mazer

Language:

English

Category:

Teenagers

Subcategory:

Literature & Fiction

ePub size:

1676 kb

Other formats:

txt azw lit rtf

Rating:

4.4

Publisher:

HMH Books for Young Readers; First edition (May 1, 2007)

Pages:

160

ISBN:

0152062718

Missing Pieces e-book

by Norma Fox Mazer


Norma Fox Mazer (May 15, 1931 – October 17, 2009) was an American author and teacher, best known for her books for children and young adults

Norma Fox Mazer (May 15, 1931 – October 17, 2009) was an American author and teacher, best known for her books for children and young adults. Her novels featured credible young characters confronting difficult situations such as family separation and death

Norma Fox Mazer, Missing Pieces (Avon, 1995).

Norma Fox Mazer, Missing Pieces (Avon, 1995)

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Jessie’s father has always been a missing piece of her life-but if she were to find him, how would he feel about her? .

Jessie’s father has always been a missing piece of her life-but if she were to find him, how would he feel about her? Jessie Wells thinks four is a good number. Things with four sides are sturdy and strong.

ONE. The Disappearing Dude. Something is missing: James Wells. Who he was, what he was like, why he left us. Why he left me. TWO. The Tiniest Punctuation Mark in the World.

Norma Fox Mazer (1931–2009) was an American author and teacher best known for her books for young adults. Among the honors Mazer earned for her writing were a National Book Award nomination, a Lewis Carroll Shelf Award (for Saturday, The Twelfth of October), and a Newbery Medal.

Jessie Wells can't remember her father, James-he left her family when she was very young

Jessie Wells can't remember her father, James-he left her family when she was very young. Jessie Wells can't remember her father, James-he left her family when she was very young. Now fifteen, Jessie has a sudden desire to track down the man she always thought of as "the disappearing dude. She calls all the Wellses in the phone book, hoping to speak to someone who knows her father.

Jessie Wells can't remember her father, James--he left her family when she was very young. Now fifteen, Jessie has a sudden desire to track down the man she always thought of as "the disappearing dude." She calls all the Wellses in the phone book, hoping to speak to someone who knows her father. But will she be prepared when she finally finds him?
OwerSpeed
Norma Fox Mazer, Missing Pieces (Avon, 1995)

The only reason I had any idea who Norma Fox Mazer was when I was going through a box of my wife's books from her junior high and high school years was that way back when I was knee-high to a grasshopper, Mazer has co-written a teen thriller with husband Harry called The Solid Gold Kid. Looking back on it, the parts I remember about it were cheesy as hell (a romance subplot developing between two teens who have been abducted? Really? Even I wasn't that horny when I was 15!), but at the time, that book was, if you'll excuse the pun, solid gold. So when I found Missing Pieces in the stack she was planning on sending to Half-Price Books, I kept it out and gave it a go. I wasn't as enthused about it as School Library Journal (“...brilliant and subtle...”), but it does what it sets out to do, and that counts for something.

Plot: Jessie Wells, 14, has a good home life—mom, aunt (great-aunt, actually), boyfriend, etc.—but what's missing is dad. Her mother has spun stories about her absent father, and Jessie has embellished those in her head, but the fantasy is no longer enough; she gets the idea that it's time to track down her father and find out who he really is. Alarm bells are probably already going off in your head; this is teen fiction, after all. But despite warnings, both subtle and not, Jessie's determination never wavers. In fact, it gets stronger as Aunt Zis, one of the pieces of bedrock in Jessie's life, slides further into Alzheimer's. Jessie never verbalizes it, but could she be looking for her father as a substitute for the pseudo-parent she knows she is going to lose soon?

The tagline everyone likes to use for this book, also stolen from that SLJ piece (“a teen seeking her father and finding herself”), is cliché, almost painfully so, but I'm not sure I can find a better way to say that, either. So I'll go with it. (Cindy Darling Codell, the entire reviewer community owes you big time for that summary of the book.) w, like I said, I haven't read The Solid Gold Kid in a lotta years, but what I remember of that and what I experienced with this dovetail pretty nicely; Mazer is often as subtle as the proverbial velvet-clad herring to the face, especially when it comes to foreshadowing. This is not as big a problem as it may seem, because she balances the Douglas Sirk-esque melodrama with well-tuned characters placed in generally believable situations. It's a good book that could have been a great one with a lighter touch. ** ½
Auridora
Without giving away any spoilers all I can say is that the ending is terrible and lazy. The B plot is more interesting than the main plot.
RuTGamer
I read this book years ago, and I still remember it as one of the few books that completely changed my life. I'd never read about a young girl who'd been abandoned by her father before, and reading this helped me come to terms with my own life without my father. Jessie is a strong girl who's raised by two equally strong women: her mother and her mother's aunt. Even though she has a great family and friends, she still feels that something profoundly important is missing from her life: her father. She tries to track him down, but though she never gets the answers she wants, she learns to appreciate the life she has and continue to be the best person she can be regardless of her past. I could really relate to this book and I think other people who grew up without a mother or father will find Jessie's story intriguing and moving.
Bragis
This book is a bout a 14 year old girl name Jesse Welles and she lives with her mom and her aunt Vis. Her father James Welles had abandoned her and her mother when Jesse was only a few months old. They don't know why he left but he never came back. Jesse is trying to find her father, so she looks in the phone books for the last names Welles. Then she found a Dennis Welles which lived in Myrtle and she finds out Dennis is her father's cousin. Later Jesse and her mother gets into an argument because her mother doesn't want Jesse to find her father then get hurt just like she did. But Jesse didn't listen to her mom she went off to Myrtle with a boy name Jack Kettle who's Mary beth's crush. Jesse never found her father though but if she had she wanted to tell him who she was and who's she's grown up to be without him in her life.

I think this book was good because it tells how she's going through without her dad and stuff it's really sad but interesting.
Doath
I thought this was a very good book. It is an adventurous story. Missing Pieces is a book I will never forget.

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