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» » Where the Waters Divide: A 3,000 Mile Trek Along America's Continental Divide
Where the Waters Divide: A 3,000 Mile Trek Along America's Continental Divide e-book

Author:

Daniel R. Smith,Karen Berger

Language:

English

Category:

Reference

Subcategory:

Writing Research & Publishing Guides

ePub size:

1994 kb

Other formats:

azw docx mbr rtf

Rating:

4.1

Publisher:

Countryman Press; 1 edition (November 17, 1997)

Pages:

334

ISBN:

0881504033

Where the Waters Divide: A 3,000 Mile Trek Along America's Continental Divide e-book

by Daniel R. Smith,Karen Berger


Where the Waters Divide book .

Where the Waters Divide book. Where the Waters Divide: A 3,000-Mile Trek Along America's Continental Divide. 0881504033 (ISBN13: 9780881504033). They suffer through the heat of the desert, fierce thunderstorms and snowstorms, and winds so strong it nearly blew them over.

com User, May 6, 2009. This is the tale of Karen Berger's 1990 walk on the Continental Divide Trail (CDT) from Mexico to Canada. As she walks through New Mexico, Colorado, Wyoming and Montana (and a bit of Idaho) she explores the nation, its' history and its' people.

I live about 80 miles from the CD in Animas, NM where the story starts

Hiking a 3,200-mile course from Mexico to Canada in little more than five months-over deserts, through forests, and across countless mountain peaks-the trek involved equal measures of advance planning and on-the-spot resourcefulness. I live about 80 miles from the CD in Animas, NM where the story starts. New Mexico was a constantly battle for water and fighting off the cattle that often contaminated the water sites.

Berger, Karen, 1959-; Smith, Daniel R. (Daniel Richard).

Where the Waters Divide. A 3,000 Mile Trek Along America's Continental Divide. Karen Berger (Author), Daniel R. Smith (Author). A Countryman Press book. A tale of adventure, this is also a story of the American West and the ways in which it has been "used, crossed, inhabited, cursed, logged, grazed, and climbed. The authors write with insight about the history, environment, and politics of the region as they pass through grazing lands and reservations, mines and ghost towns, and miles and miles of wilderness.

The Continental Divide of the Americas (also known as the Great Divide, the Western Divide or simply the Continental Divide; Spanish: Divisoria continental de América, Gran Divisoria) is the principal, and largely mountainous, hydrological divide o. .

The Continental Divide of the Americas (also known as the Great Divide, the Western Divide or simply the Continental Divide; Spanish: Divisoria continental de América, Gran Divisoria) is the principal, and largely mountainous, hydrological divide of the Americas

Books with the subject: United States-continental Divide National Scenic Trail. Where the Waters Divide: A 3,000-Mile Trek Along America's Continental Divide - Karen Berger, Daniel R Smith.

Books with the subject: United States-continental Divide National Scenic Trail. Hiking, united states-continental divide national scenic trail. Hiking the Triple Crown: How to Hike America's Longest Trails - Appalachian Trail - Pacific Crest Trail - Continental Divide Trail - Karen Berger.

Where the Waters Divide: A 3,000 Mile Trek Along America's Continental Divide. by Karen Berger, Daniel R. Smith.

Where the Waters Divide : A 3,000-Mile Trek along America's Continental Divide. 2wk · couragewerewolf · r/KTM. Since you guys liked him, here is my Grandfather again, mapping The Continental Divide. 2yr · mappersdelight · r/Surveying. My first campsite on the Continental Divide Trail. 2yr · 3nvisi0n · r/CampingandHiking. The continental divide through James peak in winter park, Colorado. 7mo · yoboi5finga · r/Mountaineering.

The Continental Divide National Scenic Trail (in short Continental Divide Trail (CDT)) is a United States National Scenic Trail running 3,100 miles (5,000 km) between Mexico and Canada. It follows the Continental Divide of the Americas along the Rocky Mountains and traverses five . states - Montana, Idaho, Wyoming, Colorado, and New Mexico. In Montana it crosses Triple Divide Pass (near Triple Divide Peak which separates the Hudson Bay, Atlantic Ocean and Pacific Ocean drainages.

A tale of adventure, this is also a story of the American West and the ways in which it has been "used, crossed, inhabited, cursed, logged, grazed, and climbed." The authors write with insight about the history, environment, and politics of the region as they pass through grazing lands and reservations, mines and ghost towns, and miles and miles of wilderness.


Munigrinn
I've read a lot of thru-hiking books covering all of the three major trails in the U.S. and most of them were written by people who aren't writers, or have any idea how to make a 6 month long hike interesting. This book does. Like Dan White's novel, The Cactus Eaters, this book is full of historical facts intermingled with the daily joys and sorrows of thru-hiking. It was never tedious, nor did it feel like a boring journal that most others are. I highly recommend it. It's one of the rare books where the thru-hiker doesn't become an arrogant naturalist that condemns you, the common reader in society as some monster of consumerism and earthly destruction. Well written, well researched.
Fonceiah
This is the tale of Karen Berger's 1990 walk on the Continental Divide Trail (CDT) from Mexico to Canada. As she walks through New Mexico, Colorado, Wyoming and Montana (and a bit of Idaho) she explores the nation, its' history and its' people. At the time of Karen's walk the CDT was more of an idea than an actual marked trail, so the made there way mostly with maps and compass.

It a personal story of passion, blisters, searching for water, getting drenched by rain, blistering heat and bone chilling cold. And some scary moments including getting lost, as she puts it;

"There is the kind of being lost when you don't know exactly where you are but you know that if you keep going...eventually you will get hit a river. There is a kind of being lost where you know about where you are, but it's not where you're supposed to be...There's the kind of being lost where you think you can retrace your steps...and there is the kind of being lost where you have wandered off your map and onto terra incognita... the kind where you can't even decide to go forward or backward because you don't know which way forward and backward might be...We were that kind of lost."

As she crosses private ranches she discovers there is more to cowboys than the stereotypes, and she comes to depend on, to some extent, the kindness of mid-western Americans. She fights her fear of grisly bears was she walks through Yellowstone National Park. And she does battle with the National Park Service bureaucracy as they plead for camping permits in Glacier National Park.

Overall it is a gripping story. It is currently out of print, but there are still some sources of the book on-line. Well worth reading.
Gavirgas
Great writing, great stories, great couple. A very uplifting and positive story for such a very hard journey. I will look for other books by the author.
Ironrunner
The couple had already hiked the Appalachian Trail (AT) (they met on the trail) and now decided to hike another long-distance trail. But like they soon found out, the CD trail is nothing like the AT. The CD is more remote, more challenging. There is less water along the way and in portions the trail is poorly marked. And in many sections the trail goes through private land that the ranchers guard protectively.

I live about 80 miles from the CD in Animas, NM where the story starts. New Mexico was a constantly battle for water and fighting off the cattle that often contaminated the water sites. Sometimes the windmills were dry and abandoned. I think the author's perceived anger toward cattle come from her experiences of near dehydration from no water because what water they did find at times was claimed by the cows.

Colorado was all up and down, both figuratively and literally. The 12,000' peaks, the weather on top, spotting a mountain lion, getting too close to a lightning bolt...

And then Montana. I was relieved when the couple made it into the Big Sky country but then they had to beat feet to the border because an early winter came that year. The end was anticlimatic, as they reached the Canadian border and the border crossing had just closed for the season.

The story was well written and it was obvious the wife was at times physically pushed by her husband. At times she was exhausted when he had no problem. They were helped along the way by an eldery retired couple who'd follow them in their old van at various meeting towns along the way. The couples' conversations in bars with ranchers and cowboys and locals was at times stressful, but I think she handled the diversity well. (But did the locals?)

The CD is no AT. After reading this I'm in no way inclined to hike the CD any time soon.
Araath
What the authors set out to do is pretty amazing -- walk along the Continental Drive from Mexico to Canada -- but the book which chronicles their journey isn't quite in the same league. Still, it did what good travel writing should -- it made me want to go out and try to do it myself.

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