ComicsChildrenHumorFitnessReferenceITLawCookingHobbiesTeachingSelf-HelpPhotoFantasyHistoryTestsCalendarsFictionLGBTTeenagersTransportMemorisMedicineMysteryRelationshipsPoliticsBusinessSpiritualityRomanceBiblesMathSportTravelOtherNo category
» » Irons in the Fire
Irons in the Fire e-book

Author:

John McPhee

Language:

English

Category:

Reference

Subcategory:

Writing Research & Publishing Guides

ePub size:

1399 kb

Other formats:

lit azw doc lrf

Rating:

4.2

Publisher:

Farrar, Straus and Giroux; Later Printing Used edition (April 30, 1998)

Pages:

215

ISBN:

0374525455

Irons in the Fire e-book

by John McPhee


Irons in the fire - Release - In virgin forest - The gravel page - Duty of care - Rinard at Manheim - Travels of the rock. The differing contents of this book reflect the variety in the overall span of master observer McPhee's work

Irons in the fire - Release - In virgin forest - The gravel page - Duty of care - Rinard at Manheim - Travels of the rock. The differing contents of this book reflect the variety in the overall span of master observer McPhee's work. Irons in the Fire concerns catlle rustling in contemporary Nevada. The Gravel Page is about forensic geology-a science used to help solve major crimes and puzzles on an even greater scale. Rinard at Manheim is an experimental story about an auction of exotic cars

McPhee received the Award in Literature from the Academy of Arts and Letters in 1977. In 1999, he was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for Annals of the Former World. He lives in Princeton, New Jersey.

McPhee received the Award in Literature from the Academy of Arts and Letters in 1977.

Irons in the Fire book. This is a book of essays by John McPhee published in 1997, but which originally appeared in The New Yorker, where I probably read all of them at one time or another during the last twenty years. Irons in the Fire is clearly a part of the author's geology period.

John McPhee was born in Princeton, New Jersey, and was educated at Princeton University and Cambridge University.

Most people think cattle rustling belongs to the past or to Wild West movies, yet, as McPhee informs us, the practice still presents problems for cattle ranchers in Nevada, necessitating the state. John McPhee was born in Princeton, New Jersey, and was educated at Princeton University and Cambridge University. His writing career began at Time magazine and led to his long association with The New Yorker, where he has been a staff writer since 1965.

Irons in the Fire - John McPhee. You build a fire and use it to doctor a brand. The business end of most running irons is a short simple line. In Princeton, New Jersey, where I live, I was having lunch not long ago with a friend just home from Nevada. He prospects there for precious metals, in the isolation country in the eastern part of the state, hundreds of miles from Reno and about as far from Las Vegas. It becomes a red-hot stylus for metamorphic sketching.

Praise for Irons in the Fire. McPhee is known as the dean of 'literary journalists'. John McPhee was born in Princeton, New Jersey, and . His writing creates its own wonderful topographical map of the ways of the world, contemplated with both microcosmic closeness and cosmic breadth. Also in 1965, he published his first book, A Sense of Where You Are, with Farrar, Straus and Giroux, and in the years since, he has written nearly 30 books, including Oranges (1967), Coming into the Country (1977), The Control of Nature (1989), The Founding Fish (2002), Uncommon Carriers (2007), and Silk Parachute.

Irons in the Fire, John McPhee. Варианты приобретения

Irons in the Fire, John McPhee. Варианты приобретения. McPhee-a shad fisherman himself-recounts the shad's cameo role in the lives of George Washington and Henry David Thoreau.

In this collection John McPhee once agains proves himself as a master observer of all arenas of life as well a powerful.

Master essayist John McPhee heard about vehicles in Nevada that resemble police cars, but the cop inside was .

Master essayist John McPhee heard about vehicles in Nevada that resemble police cars, but the cop inside was actually a brand inspector, a lawman charged with. This acclaimed collection of essays begins with the title essay and a trip to Nevada, where, in the company of a brand inspector, John McPhee discovers that cattle rustling is not just history. Описание: Stephanie Pearl-McPhee's deepest wish is that everyone understand that knitting is at least as fun as baseball and way cooler than the evil looped path of crochet. Every project, from a misshapen hat to the most magnificent sweater, holds a story. Yarn Harlot tells all those stories with humor, insight, and sympathy for the obsessed. Over 50 million people in America knit. No longer just a fad or a hobby, knitting has advanced to a lifestyle.

This acclaimed collection of essays begins with the title essay and a trip to Nevada, where, in the company of a brand inspector, John McPhee discovers that cattle rustling is not just history.


artman
I think of John McPhee as the Norman Rockwell of literature. He captures the American scene like no one else. This particular book is a total pleasure. If one never reads anything else by McPhee they should read "Travels of the Rock". The last essay in this book, it is about Plymouth Rock. He again combines human history and geology in a masterful way. It is a literary jewel.
Blackworm
John McPhee is the top of the writer stack.
olgasmile
Dust and openness of Central Nevada are all to feel in McPhee's short story. Character definition is clear between the ranchers and the half citified rustlers.
Jum
Great read, well written and informative.
Gavinranara
Boring, repetitive and an effort to read.
Hasirri
It's an endless onslought of weird looking brands and marginally interesting cowboys from Nevada -- the home of that jerk Bundy. I couldn't finish it.
Dagdarad
What could be more presumptuous than attempting to sit in judgment of writings of John McPhee? Essayist of the American scene for the New Yorker magazine, McPhee is a lodestone for people unheralded, forgotten or simply unknown. When you read his accounts of their lives and work, his use of language, image, empathy will instill them in your memory. There, they will be cherished, later re-examined to be reflected on, or valued, or best of all, emulated. All his subjects are worthy role examples, but that is only a part of the value of reading McPhee's accounts of their lives. His scope is vast, bringing together personalities, history - often at some depth, and other related information. All this seems to pale in the light of his ability form sentences that lead you into novel worlds, elevate your interest in something unexpected, or simply describe an otherwise mundane event.
This book starts with a shock - cattle rustling isn't a practice limited to Hollywood's false sense of history. Cattle duffing remains an active practice in Nevada. Branding, the symbol of ownership, is still subject to the "running iron" in shifting title without accompanying cash exchange. Law enforcement is not applied by gun-toting marshals, but by a Brand Inspector marking tallies in the palm of his hand. McPhee escorts one across vast stretches of the Basin and climbs thousands of feet over the Range to "take attendance" of cattle like a country schoolmarm. There's little limit to how far he must travel - tracking moving cattle may lead him to California or southern Utah. McPhee's descriptions of the country are more than matched by his relation of successful apprehensions of rustlers. His account brings the action into sharp focus and you are beside the Inspector staking out a mountain hideaway.
McPhee raises the term "investigative journalist" to fresh levels of excellence. Other topics in this collection include word processing for a blind author, understanding gravel as evidence, exotic automobiles and the travels and travails of a glacial boulder - a special one. His guidance through these topics is sure, keeping your interest at a peak as he conveys a wealth of information and character description. As with any McPhee book, this one remains timeless. It's worth your attention - and retention.
This collection contains some of McPhee's masterful essays and reportage. McPhee's natural curiosity and probing questions always lead to interesting takes on seemingly mundane subject matters. Forensic geology and cattle rustling are just a few of the subjects that are given the McPhee treatment. As the jacket says, these are stories about "real people in real places." Anyone who has enjoyed McPhee's writing in the past will find plenty to like in this collection.

e-Books related to Irons in the Fire