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» » Pulitzer's Gold: Behind the Prize for Public Service Journalism
Pulitzer's Gold: Behind the Prize for Public Service Journalism e-book

Author:

Roy J. Harris Jr.

Language:

English

Category:

Reference

Subcategory:

Writing Research & Publishing Guides

ePub size:

1936 kb

Other formats:

lit rtf mbr lrf

Rating:

4.5

Publisher:

University of Missouri; Revised edition, New in Paper edition (February 1, 2010)

Pages:

488

ISBN:

0826218911

Pulitzer's Gold: Behind the Prize for Public Service Journalism e-book

by Roy J. Harris Jr.


Pulitzer’s Gold is first-rate journalism history. Philadelphia Inquirer Roy Harris has done a tremendous job bringing much forgotten history alive with his eloquent book Pulitzer's Gold.

Pulitzer’s Gold is first-rate journalism history. Philadelphia Inquirer. It is a must read for those who want an inside look at journalism at its best. There is no higher calling among American newspapers than public service journalism, and Roy Harris delves into it with flair and expertise. Gene Roberts, cowinner of the 2007 Pulitzer Prize for History. Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly. Roy Harris has done a tremendous job bringing much forgotten history alive with his eloquent book Pulitzer's Gold.

Pulitzer’s Gold is the first book to trace the ninety-year history of the coveted Pulitzer .

Pulitzer’s Gold is the first book to trace the ninety-year history of the coveted Pulitzer Prize for Public Service, awarded annually to a newspaper rather than to individuals, in the form of that Gold Medal. No journalism awards are awaited with as much anticipation as the Pulitzer Prizes. Roy J. Harris Jr. served from 1971 to 1994 as a reporter with the Wall Street Journal, including six years as deputy chief of its fourteen-member Los Angeles bureau.

General Interest Books. Pulitzer's Gold: A Century of Public Service Journalism

General Interest Books. Pulitzer's Gold: A Century of Public Service Journalism. By Roy J. (University of Missouri Press, 2008; Columbia University Press, 2015). The rules for winning a Pulitzer Prize in feature writing are simple, yet demanding: the prize is awarded for a distinguished example of feature writing giving prime consideration to high literary quality and originality. For over two decades, the Pulitzer has been given annually to journalists whose work best exemplifies those high ideals.

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Pulitzer’s Gold is easy to read and well designed. The book’s main quality is its textbook potential. Along with the stories behind the stories, it includes photographs, copies of newspaper pages, and a comprehensive list of all the Pulitzer Prizes, not only the Gold Medal. Pulitzer’s Gold is excellent material for teaching reflective journalists, but it is also a good history read, attractive to anyone interested in journalism, newspapers, and the press’s importance in the workings of democracy.

Pulitzer's Gold book. This book is a history of the Pulitzer Public Service Gold Medal for Journalism - the prize the Washington Post won for its Watergate coverage in the '70s and the New York Times for publishing the Pentagon Papers in the same decade.

The Pulitzer Prize for Public Service is one of the fourteen American Pulitzer Prizes annually awarded for journalism.

No journalism awards are awaited with as much anticipation as the Pulitzer Prizes

book by Roy J. Harris J. .

The Joseph Pulitzer Gold Medal for meritorious public service is an unparalleled American media honor, awarded to news organizations for collaborative reporting that moves readers, provokes change.

The Joseph Pulitzer Gold Medal for meritorious public service is an unparalleled American media honor, awarded to news organizations for collaborative reporting that moves readers, provokes change, and advances the journalistic profession. Updated to reflect new winners and the many changes in the practice and business of journalism, Pulitzer’s Gold goes behind the scenes to explain the mechanics and effects of these groundbreaking works.

Take a look at ww. ulitzersgold. Man is the only animal that blushes. Or needs t. - - Mark Twain. adındaki daha fazla kişiyi gör. Türkçeالعربية Español. Kurdî (Kurmancî) English (UK).

No journalism awards are awaited with as much anticipation as the Pulitzer Prizes. And among those Pulitzers, none is more revered than the Joseph Pulitzer Gold Medal. "Pulitzer's Gold" is the first book to trace the ninety-year history of the coveted Pulitzer Prize for Public Service, awarded annually to a newspaper rather than to individuals, in the form of that Gold Medal. Exploring this service-journalism legacy, Roy Harris recalls dozens of 'stories behind the stories', often allowing the journalists involved to share their own accounts. Harris takes his Gold Medal saga through two world wars, the Great Depression, the civil rights struggle, and the Vietnam era before bringing public-service journalism into a twenty-first century that includes 9/11, a Catholic Church scandal, and corporate exposes. "Pulitzer's Gold" offers a new way of looking at journalism history and practice and a new lens through which to view America's own story.
Moswyn
Pure Gold---Five Shining Stars for "Pulitizer's Gold"

"river run, past Eve and Adam's," so begins Joyce's "Finnegans Wake" that boisterous tale tracing through time and space the story of Anna Livia Plurabelle, the Liffey, and her people. As we reach the sea, the last words of the last chapter, ("A way a lone a last a loved a long the") return to the first. "Pulitzer's Gold" has that grand cycling sweep. Beginning in Chapter 1 with the heart-holding, eye-catching stories of the two 2006 prizes (for coverage of Hurricane Katrina by the Sun Herald and the Times Picayune), the book's close celebrates the 200l award to the Oregonian for uncovering U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service abuses.

The 21 glorious chapters interweave three eternal golden braids, as intricate as any described by Hofstadter in Escher, Gödel, and Bach. These are (1) the story of the Pulitzer Prize itself, a story of growth, change, challenges, and evolution, (2) the individual stories of the newspapers, publishers, editors, and investigative reporters on whose walls shine the gold medals, and (3) the winning stories themselves, an archive of democracy in America, 1917 to the present.

Written tautly, wittily, masterfully, Pulitzer's Gold represents in itself a monumental investigative expedition. Archival research, yes, but also years of meetings, interviews, conversations, verifying and expanding what was being discovered. As good a read as a novel, this is equally a work of scholarship, each chapter detailing the sources, and illuminated by a comprehensive appendix of all the Pulitzer journal awards.

The bigger story is told through the individual stories, an approach that is endlessly fascinating. This is, in a way, the Vietnam Memorial Wall of courageous, high risk, public service journalism. The names and to a good extent the personalities whose best and brightest work may have gone into each Gold Medal award live again in this book. They are spoken of with the respect, honor, and appreciation that one outstanding journalist---Harris--- can give to another, a discerning, differentiating, discriminating honor someone outside of journalism probably could not fully catch with a guide such as Harris.

Equally valuable is the mother lode of information most of us may not know about the prizes: for example, that the applicants self-nominate and have to prepare portfolios showing why the story they propose should be recognized. For example, that consequences---results, impacts, actions---are one of the three criteria for the award, anticipating by many years the expectation that claims for merit have to be backed up by evidence of good effects.

Indeed, this book had its beginning in a presentation given by author Roy J. Harris Jr. on the one hundredth birthday of his father, Roy J. Harris Sr, of the St. Louis Post Dispatch. In this presentation, Harris Jr. not only honored his award-winning father but also reflected on the newspaper's then unique record of receiving five Pulitzer Gold awards. "What," he asked then, "was happening in this paper, at this time, that raised the St. Louis Post Dispatch to such a level of achievement?" The St. Louis Post Dispatch was among the journalistic homes of the Pulitzer family, but there was more happening---actually, the procedures of the award intended to reduce favoritism may have acted against specific recognition. What was that "more? Harris shared with us in this presentation what he learned about the way in which courageous public service journalism is created.

Now, seven years later, we are fortunate to have a full picture, across all the winners, that offers a basis in evidence for consideration of the organizational qualities and the individual qualities encouraging the risks of public service investigations. Pulitzer's Gold is a grand panoramic picture, a grand book to study, and a grand book to read.

If there is a "but" to this marvelous book, it may be a yearning for a closing chapter tracing the meaning of the strands and putting together an initial overall answer to what makes for a great newspaper (by Pulitzer standards) and where we are today. For example, the Pulitzer strand shows many changes: are the forces that drove these needed changes still vital? What may be ahead for the Pulitzer Board (and committees) in the changing future?

In contrast, there is splendid detail about each winning story but less sense of growth and more sense of a stasis in that the stories are mostly about: corruption and catastrophes. Some hard-hitting, exceptionally courageous stories about the Ku Klux Klan helped do their good work, and the Klan has disappeared in gold award winners in the last decades. Environmental issues can be seen expanding in passion and depth. Bad government is an enduring topic. Few investigative, award-winning stories seem to honor what works. Is this apparent pattern because public service journalism as anticipated in the Freedom of Speech clauses is essential to telling truths to power, particularly its inconvenient, bad, and ugly sides? Having worked for the U.S. General Accountability Office, I fully appreciate the need for as many trust-worthy feet as possible to jump into that scale of justice, but a last chapter really getting into Harris's ideas about the grand themes would be, well, grand.

The "but" is minor relative to all that is excellent in "Pulitzer's Gold." From the
elegant, appropriate cover designed by Kristie Lee, to the beautifully typography and layout, to the superb contents, this book is highly recommended. Applause to RJH, Jr., who has continued the noble legacy of the "century of those who mined the gold" and in doing so, help us honor the courage of those who are writing next year's award winning story.
Legionstatic
Roy j. Harris Jr.'s book "Pulitzer's Gold" is a very thorough review of the coveted Pulitzer awards. It gives everything that a reader might want to know about the awards. It even included a paragraph devoted to my mother's contribution to the award that my father received. Very unexpected but much appreciated because she played a pivotal role in his crusade against the Ku Klux Klan.
Ynye
Roy Harris has done a tremendous job bringing much forgotten history alive with his eloquent book Pulitzer's Gold. In the tradition of great historical writers like Barbara Tuchman, Harris weaves together rich strands of narrative to tell the compelling stories behind the most influential journalism of our times like the publishing of the Pentagon Papers, the year-long investigation into the Watergate break-in by Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein, and the outing of the Boston Diocese's shocking cover-up of the sexual predators in its midst. These stories and others are already familiar to us but what's not familiar are the stories behind the stories, and by filling in these details, Harris does a tremendous service not only to journalists but to anyone for whom history is a dynamic, urgent teacher. In reading Harris' gripping accounts of how these stories unfolded, I was reminded how vital good historical writing is to our understanding of what's going on today. This book is sure to attract a readership outside the communities of journalists and historians for whom these stories will be engrossing; I suspect anyone with a thirst for understanding our contemporary culture will find his writing invaluable. Maybe even more importantly, they'll find the stories just a good read. After all, how many of us knew that both the New York Times and the Washington Post were almost bypassed for the Public Service gold medal by the Pulitzer committee for their respective work on the Pentagon Papers and Watergate? And for the Watergate affecianado, Harris' interviews with Bob Woodward and others provides entirely fresh accounts of those pivotal events from the people that were there.That's living history.
Sarin
Roy Harris has done a thorough and masterful job telling the stories of how the most worthy of all Pulitzler Prizes have been won.
Revealing how the winning newspapers deployed their resources, made courageous decisions and maintained journalism's highest ideals -- often against great odds and determined foes -- makes for inspiring reading.
In this, perhaps the most challenging time ever to be practicing journalism, "Pulitzer's Gold" is a vivid reminder of the pivotal role of selfless, dedicated, professional journalism in America.
Every journalist -- every citizen -- should read this book. These days, the role of a free press in the United States often is challenged, even ridiculed; Harris' book is a reminder of the critical importance of a free press in a democracy.
We crown heroes easily in our culture; the people Harris writes about in Pulitzer's Gold really are heroic, and this book serves a great public service in elevating the work of journalism's finest.

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