ComicsChildrenHumorFitnessReferenceITLawCookingHobbiesTeachingSelf-HelpPhotoFantasyHistoryTestsCalendarsFictionLGBTTeenagersTransportMemorisMedicineMysteryRelationshipsPoliticsBusinessSpiritualityRomanceBiblesMathSportTravelOtherNo category
» » Gentleman in the Parlour
Gentleman in the Parlour e-book

Author:

W Somerset Maugham

Language:

English

Category:

Reference

Subcategory:

Writing Research & Publishing Guides

ePub size:

1956 kb

Other formats:

docx lrf rtf doc

Rating:

4.6

Publisher:

Vintage Classics; New Ed edition (2001)

Pages:

224

ISBN:

0099286777

Gentleman in the Parlour e-book

by W Somerset Maugham


Home W. Somerset Maugham The Gentleman in the Parlour.

Home W. The gentleman in the pa. .The Gentleman in the Parlour, . This book is sold subject to the condition that it shall not, by way of trade or otherwise, be lent, resold, hired out, or otherwise circulated without the publisher’s prior consent in any form of binding or cover other than that in which it is published and without a similar condition, including this condition, being imposed on the subsequent purchaser.

In 1922 William Somerset Maugham by then already a very successful playwright, short story teller and .

In 1922 William Somerset Maugham by then already a very successful playwright, short story teller and novelist. Makes a journey from London to Ceylon and onwards to Rangoon and Mandalay, by mule to Keng Tung in the Shan state of north east Burma, from where he continues to Bangkok, Angkor Wat in Cambodia and onwards to Saigon, Hue and Hanoi in Vietnam and finally to Hong Kong across the United States and finally back to London.

Somerset Maugham is associated more with sundowners on South Sea islands, and the high life on the French .

Somerset Maugham is associated more with sundowners on South Sea islands, and the high life on the French Riviera, than with intrepid travel writing. But the Burma leg of his 1922 tour through south-east Asia saw him spend weeks moving by mule through the jungle and hills of Shan state, a journey that would be challenging even now. Maugham was an acute observer of both people and landscapes and, today, the book reads almost as an elegy for a long-gone culture

Whether by river to Mandalay, on horse through the mountains and forests of the Shan States to Bangkok, or onwards by sea, Maugham's vivid descriptions bring a lost world to life.

The tamarind is a noble tree onvulsive violence; but it.

The tamarind is a noble tree onvulsive violence; but its foliage is lacy and fern-like, so thick that notwithstanding the delicacy of the leaves it yields a dense shade. It is like an old farmer’s wife, full of years, but rugged and hale, who is clothed incongruously in fleecy muslins. Green pigeons roost in its branches

Somerset Maugham writes here of his travels in Southeast Asia in 1922-1923. Not until 1930 was the book published. The book is less a travel guide than a description of what Maugham experienced as he made this trip

Somerset Maugham writes here of his travels in Southeast Asia in 1922-1923. He mixes fact with fiction. The book is less a travel guide than a description of what Maugham experienced as he made this trip. Right at the beginning, he indicates his view regarding the importance of "facts and figures". He meets up with a Czechoslovakian who proudly states, "He is a mine of information.

author: Maugham W. Somerset d. ate. te: 2004-05-17 d.

Top. American Libraries Canadian Libraries Universal Library Community Texts Project Gutenberg Biodiversity Heritage Library Children's Library. author: Maugham W. citation: 1930 d. dentifier: Librarian, Rashtrapati Bhavan d. dentifier. origpath: /data d. copyno: 1 d.

Sixty-Five Short Stories. Footprints in the Jungle43. The Door of Opportunity44. Author: Somerset Maugham.

Somerset Maugham (1874 – 1965) was a British playwright, novelist and short story writer. Born in the British Embassy in Paris, where his father worked, Maugham was an orphan by the age of ten. He was raised by an uncle, who tried to persuade the.

Gentleman in the Parlour rare book for sale MAUGHAM, W. Somerset. The Gentleman in the Parlour. A Record of a Journey from Rangoon to Haiphong. London: William Heinemann, (1930).

Gentleman in the Parlour rare book for sale. MAUGHAM, W. Quarto, original gilt-stamped black cloth, original dust jacket. Never was Maugham more readable or so wholly delightful" than in Gentleman in the Parlour (New York Herald Tribune).

BRAND NEW, Exactly same ISBN as listed, Please double check ISBN carefully before ordering.
black coffe
On the face of it, it seems like a fine concept - one of the best writers in the world writing a travelogue of his journey across South East Asia in the early 20th century. But once I got into it, I was a bit disappointed with what was actually written inside.

Somerset Maugham is one of the finest writers I've ever read, "Of Human Bondage" is honestly one of the best novels I've ever read, more of the most memorable and soul wrenching stories ever set down on paper. His other works have been no less spectacular - "The Moon and Sixpence" and "The Painted Veil" are masterpieces both. That said, I've read a few books by Maugham that have been less than satisfying - I couldn't finish "The Razor's Edge" or "The Magician" while "Up at the Villa" and "Cakes and Ale" were both quite dull reads. Every so often though I see his name and remember how "Of Human Bondage" kept me going through an enormously long journey in Japan a few years ago and decide to try him again.

"The Gentleman in the Parlour" is very descriptive, going into detail on the buildings and surroundings, the clothes the people wear, the food they eat, the weather - if this is your thing then you'll enjoy the heck of out this book. For me, description is probably the thing I least enjoy about reading. I simply don't care what people wear or how someone describes a sunset, and frankly it reads like a dull travel program minus the visuals.

Strangely, the parts where Maugham digresses and talks about the books he's reading are the most interesting and reminded me of the essays that form his book "The Vagrant Mood". There are a couple of personal stories from the people Maugham met on the road which I'm sure were once scandalous and racy but sadly in the light of the 21st century merely pale into dreariness.

That said, I did finish the book instead of setting it aside with a sigh. It's immensely readable and Maugham's style in this book is very chatty and amiable. It feels like you're being told a story by a human version of Carroll's Cheshire Cat. But overall I would rate it quite low in this writer's list of great works and would instead implore the curious reader to pick up his more accomplished and beautiful books "Of Human Bondage" and "The Painted Veil", the latter of which is set in South East Asia and is a far more entertaining book.
Rishason
Very good book.
Zinnthi
The Gentleman in the Parlour by W. Somerset Maugham

A single man?

In 1922 William Somerset Maugham by then already a very successful playwright, short story teller and novelist. Makes a journey from London to Ceylon and onwards to Rangoon and Mandalay, by mule to Keng Tung in the Shan state of north east Burma, from where he continues to Bangkok, Angkor Wat in Cambodia and onwards to Saigon, Hue and Hanoi in Vietnam and finally to Hong Kong across the United States and finally back to London.

He only got around to writing his account of this trip seven years later in the travel story ‘The Gentleman in the Parlour’. In the years in between he was very productive and wrote some of his most famous books as ‘The Painted Veil’ (1925) ‘The Casuarina Tree’ (1926) two full length plays and the novel ‘Cakes and Ale’ (1930)

High points in this travel story are his (mule) trip to upper Burma, his period in Bangkok and his description of Angkor Wat in Cambodia. Aldo he tells us he has left himself at home he gives us a very interesting and personal account of his observations. But more than a traveller Maugham remains a story teller and writer, some of the stories he tells us from this trip he published elsewhere to, sometimes even before this journey.

So more than a travelogue this is a very carefully composed novel in the form of a traveler’s story. And also his observations tent to be very personal he is very careful about his private life. For instance there is no word about his companion. His eighteen year younger lover Gerald Haxton, how also was a great help on all his journeys. He always pretends to travel alone (with local guides and helpers) he actually never does. Like many famous travelers, such as Bruce Chatwin, V.S. Naipaul, Graham Green and Wilfred Thesiger, all pretending to travel alone, but all in the good company of lovers, wives and mistresses. Nothing wrong with that but it sheds a little different light on their journeys, and makes the travels of the few actual solitary wanderers all the more heroic.

All do complaining sometimes the periods of his travels though south east Asia must have been among the happiest of Maugham’s life. He is happy, healthy, in the company of his lover, enjoying country as well as city, confident, hopeful and full of energy. This novels tells us that too, the long line of works he wrote after this trip even so.
Coiriel
Somerset Maugham was one of the world's most famous and widely-read writers of the early 20th Century. Now that 100 years have passed, he is hardly read at all, except for OF HUMAN BONDAGE and maybe THE MOON AND SIXPENCE. This is a major loss for booklovers, because Maugham wrote with an incomparable dignity, clarity, and insight. In THE GENTLEMAN IN THE PARLOUR, he takes his gifts to the Far East -- into a colonial world that no longer exists on the face of the earth. He experiences a way of life that we will never see again. As a small, stammering homosexual, Maugham was far from the stereotypical conquering Englishman, yet he observed all the perquisites of class and station, traveling in style as one of the first truly rich (from his writing) authors. At all times he wrote frankly and unflinchingly, before "telling it like it is" became a catchphrase. As a self-made writer who labored to achieve and maintain his craft, he also wrote with unerring elegance. His great novels are soemwhat strained, if you will, by the dictates of fiction and his publishers. GENTLEMAN IN THE PARLOUR, however, is a purer Maugham, something closer to a remarkable human personality who should be celebrated with his contemporaries D.H. Lawrence, Joseph Conrad, Henry James, and even James Joyce. Maugham saw inside the human heart as clearly as any of them, but perhaps modern audiences are not as pleased with what he saw.

e-Books related to Gentleman in the Parlour