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» » Weiter Leben (German Edition)
Weiter Leben (German Edition) e-book

Author:

Ruth Kluger

Language:

German

Category:

Reference

Subcategory:

Words Language & Grammar

ePub size:

1644 kb

Other formats:

lrf mobi rtf mbr

Rating:

4.7

Publisher:

Koch, Neff & Oetinger & Co (November 1, 1994)

Pages:

285

ISBN:

3892440360

Weiter Leben (German Edition) e-book

by Ruth Kluger


Weiter Leben Paperback – 1 Jan 2005. by Ruth Kluger (Author).

Ruth Kluger's Holocaust memoirs weiter leben: eine]ugend (1992)and StillAlive: A Holocaust Girlhood . The book also made famous its small publishing house, Wallstein.

Ruth Kluger's Holocaust memoirs weiter leben: eine]ugend (1992)and StillAlive: A Holocaust Girlhood Remembered (2001) question such universalizing tendencies and provocatively pose the Holocaust as a particularevent with ns. When Kluger's weiter ugend was published in Germany in 1992, it met with enormous success, selling over 250,000 copies and quickly climbing bestseller lists.

This article poses that Ruth Kluger's Holocaust memoirs weiter leben: eine Jugend (1992) and Still Alive: A. .This essay proposes that Ruth Klüger’s still alive is an intentional American rewrite of her German autobiography.

This article poses that Ruth Kluger's Holocaust memoirs weiter leben: eine Jugend (1992) and Still Alive: A Holocaust Girlhood Remembered (2001) challenge an understanding of the Holocaust as a universal and eternal evil. Using different strategies of adaptation and cross-cultural translation, Klüger transforms her life story into a contemporary Jewish-American autobiography.

ISBN 13: 9783423119504.

Ruth Klueger’s Still Alive: A Holocaust Girlhood Remembered is a powerful book that is difficult to describe. The work is divided into four sections and an epilogue. Vienna recounts Klueger’s early childhood in the city. The Camps discusses Klueger’s time spent as a twelve- and thirteen-year-old in Theresienstadt, Auschwitz-Birkenau, the labor camp at Gross-Rosen, and on a death march throughout Germany.

Gifts & Registry.

Im Folgenden werde ich daher am Beispiel von Ruth Klügers Autobio-graphie Weiter leben. Eine Jugend methodische und didaktische Vorüberlegungen zu einer Lektüre von Holocaust-Literatur in der Schule erörtern sowie das Buch in Hinblick auf seine Eignung als Schullektüre untersuchen.

When Klüger's weiter leben: einejugendwas published .

When Klüger's weiter leben: einejugendwas published in Germany in 1992, it met with enormous success, selling over 250,000 copies and quickly climbing bestseller lists. weiter leben: eine Jugend was subsequently translated into Dutch, French, Italian, Spanish, Czech, and Japanese, but an English translation of the book never came forth.

Ruth Klüger (born 30 October 1931) is Professor Emerita of German Studies at the University of California, Irvine and a Holocaust survivor. She is also the author of the bestseller weiter leben: Eine Jugend about her childhood in the Third Reich

Ruth Klüger (born 30 October 1931) is Professor Emerita of German Studies at the University of California, Irvine and a Holocaust survivor. She is also the author of the bestseller weiter leben: Eine Jugend about her childhood in the Third Reich. In March 1938, Hitler marched into Vienna.

Rare book
Steelcaster
(I read the German original, titled "Weiter leben: Eine Jugend”. The English title is “Still Alive”.)

It would be quite an understatement to say that this book is an excellent Holocaust memoir. You might as well describe Goethe's Faust as a captivating story about a sexual relationship gone bad.

"Weiter Leben" goes way beyond any Holocaust memoir I have read. If Primo Levy's "Survival in Auschwitz" goes deep into psychology and philosophy, this book digs even deeper. Yet I still found it easy to read. The psychology and philosophy of this book is smack on your head. It doesn't require the reader to be used to any psychological or philosophical terminology.

Ruth Klueger's sentence structures are a bit unusual, but readable, and her punctuation is, let's say, her own. Don't make the mistake and jump to the conclusion that this book needs more editing. It doesn't. I am positive that Ruth Klueger knows standard grammar and punctuation rules. Early on in this book, you will realize that Ruth Klueger has been born headstrong. Besides, I am rather sure that she has become allergic to rules and regulations. I don't blame her. Imagine having to suffer through all of the Nazis' senseless ordinances harassing Jews and then, of course, all the sadistic and dehumanizing enslavement in the concentration camps -- the senseless, torturing roll-calls, the humiliating nakedness during line-ups for showers, head-shavings, de-lousing, so-called medical examinations, and "selection" (which sorted for slave labor or gas chamber). Ruth Klueger no longer has to strip naked. But she does. Whereas Primo Levi bares his soul, Ruth Klueger strips hers naked.

During the first part of this book, covering Ruth Klueger’s childhood before the various concentration camps, I thought: ‘Oh, my! How can anyone be so negative? This child must have come out of her mother’s womb determined to become depressive and, apart from that, determined to aggravate every family member, relative, and family friend, within reach. Am I even going to like her?’ Yet I did come to like her, not always and in every situation, but certainly for the most part of this book.

Ruth Klueger questions everything. She questions her own thoughts, convictions, excuses, motives, and emotions, and she questions those of her fellow human beings. Nothing that anyone tries to feed her as knowledge, wisdom, or (unproven) fact remains unquestioned. This makes her rather unpopular with most people and occasionally gets her into trouble even with friends.

One might say that Ruth Klueger thinks too much. But does she really? Reading this book, I have, instead, come to the conclusion that most other people think too little.

So, for instance: Is Germany really coming to terms with its past by sending conchies to whitewash fences in Auschwitz?

And what can a human conscience expect from its owner? Is cowardice the norm and the child of a natural instinct for survival? Yet where are the limits of cowardice? When does it become complicity of evil?

Ruth Klueger points out that the luck of the Holocaust survivors does not diminish the dimension of the crime. And she disallows that the survivors are being used as “credits” to be subtracted from the great “debit”. She writes:

“How can I keep you, the reader, from rejoicing with me, now that the gas chambers are no longer threatening me, and I am headed for a happy end of a post-war world that I am sharing with you … … … How can I keep you from breathing a sigh of relief?”

(Please note that the above is my own translation. Since I read the German original, I will refrain from quoting any more passages from the book, as my translation may differ from the English version.)

Needless to say that this book is thought-provoking because you will have guessed this by now. Will it activate everyone’s brain to think? No, it won’t. Some brains are not made for thinking.

Don’t believe it? Just read the praising reviews of “Er ist wieder da” (“Look Who’s Back”), a book that depicts Hitler as a somewhat likable curmudgeon; or better still, read my 1-star review of this book and the following war with commentators who think that Hitler lends himself as a comic figure. Here is the link:

https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...

(I read the German original, titled "Weiter leben: Eine Jugend”. The English title is “Still Alive”.)

It would be quite an understatement to say that this book is an excellent Holocaust memoir. You might as well describe Goethe's Faust as a captivating story about a sexual relationship gone bad.

"Weiter Leben" goes way beyond any Holocaust memoir I have read. If Primo Levy's "Survival in Auschwitz" goes deep into psychology and philosophy, this book digs even deeper. Yet I still found it easy to read. The psychology and philosophy of this book is smack on your head. It doesn't require the reader to be used to any psychological or philosophical terminology.

Ruth Klueger's sentence structures are a bit unusual, but readable, and her punctuation is, let's say, her own. Don't make the mistake and jump to the conclusion that this book needs more editing. It doesn't. I am positive that Ruth Klueger knows standard grammar and punctuation rules. Early on in this book, you will realize that Ruth Klueger has been born headstrong. Besides, I am rather sure that she has become allergic to rules and regulations. I don't blame her. Imagine having to suffer through all of the Nazis' senseless ordinances harassing Jews and then, of course, all the sadistic and dehumanizing enslavement in the concentration camps -- the senseless, torturing roll-calls, the humiliating nakedness during line-ups for showers, head-shavings, de-lousing, so-called medical examinations, and "selection" (which sorted for slave labor or gas chamber). Ruth Klueger no longer has to strip naked. But she does. Whereas Primo Levi bares his soul, Ruth Klueger strips hers naked.

During the first part of this book, covering Ruth Klueger’s childhood before the various concentration camps, I thought: ‘Oh, my! How can anyone be so negative? This child must have come out of her mother’s womb determined to become depressive and, apart from that, determined to aggravate every family member, relative, and family friend, within reach. Am I even going to like her?’ Yet I did come to like her, not always and in every situation, but certainly for the most part of this book.

Ruth Klueger questions everything. She questions her own thoughts, convictions, excuses, motives, and emotions, and she questions those of her fellow human beings. Nothing that anyone tries to feed her as knowledge, wisdom, or (unproven) fact remains unquestioned. This makes her rather unpopular with most people and occasionally gets her into trouble even with friends.

One might say that Ruth Klueger thinks too much. But does she really? Reading this book, I have, instead, come to the conclusion that most other people think too little.

So, for instance: Is Germany really coming to terms with its past by sending conchies to whitewash fences in Auschwitz?

And what can a human conscience expect from its owner? Is cowardice the norm and the child of a natural instinct for survival? Yet where are the limits of cowardice? When does it become complicity of evil?

Ruth Klueger points out that the luck of the Holocaust survivors does not diminish the dimension of the crime. And she disallows that the survivors are being used as “credits” to be subtracted from the great “debit”. She writes:

“How can I keep you, the reader, from rejoicing with me, now that the gas chambers are no longer threatening me, and I am headed for a happy end of a post-war world that I am sharing with you … … … How can I keep you from breathing a sigh of relief?”

(Please note that the above is my own translation. Since I read the German original, I will refrain from quoting any more passages from the book, as my translation may differ from the English version.)

Needless to say that this book is thought-provoking because you will have guessed this by now. Will it activate everyone’s brain to think? No, it won’t. Some brains are not made for thinking.

Don’t believe it? Just read the praising reviews of “Er ist wieder da” (“Look Who’s Back”), a book that depicts Hitler as a somewhat likable curmudgeon; or better still, read my 1-star review of this book and the following war with commentators who think that Hitler lends himself as a comic figure. Here is the link:

https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...

(I read the German original, titled "Weiter leben: Eine Jugend”. The English title is “Still Alive”.)

It would be quite an understatement to say that this book is an excellent Holocaust memoir. You might as well describe Goethe's Faust as a captivating story about a sexual relationship gone bad.

"Weiter Leben" goes way beyond any Holocaust memoir I have read. If Primo Levy's "Survival in Auschwitz" goes deep into psychology and philosophy, this book digs even deeper. Yet I still found it easy to read. The psychology and philosophy of this book is smack on your head. It doesn't require the reader to be used to any psychological or philosophical terminology.

Ruth Klueger's sentence structures are a bit unusual, but readable, and her punctuation is, let's say, her own. Don't make the mistake and jump to the conclusion that this book needs more editing. It doesn't. I am positive that Ruth Klueger knows standard grammar and punctuation rules. Early on in this book, you will realize that Ruth Klueger has been born headstrong. Besides, I am rather sure that she has become allergic to rules and regulations. I don't blame her. Imagine having to suffer through all of the Nazis' senseless ordinances harassing Jews and then, of course, all the sadistic and dehumanizing enslavement in the concentration camps -- the senseless, torturing roll-calls, the humiliating nakedness during line-ups for showers, head-shavings, de-lousing, so-called medical examinations, and "selection" (which sorted for slave labor or gas chamber). Ruth Klueger no longer has to strip naked. But she does. Whereas Primo Levi bares his soul, Ruth Klueger strips hers naked.

During the first part of this book, covering Ruth Klueger’s childhood before the various concentration camps, I thought: ‘Oh, my! How can anyone be so negative? This child must have come out of her mother’s womb determined to become depressive and, apart from that, determined to aggravate every family member, relative, and family friend, within reach. Am I even going to like her?’ Yet I did come to like her, not always and in every situation, but certainly for the most part of this book.

Ruth Klueger questions everything. She questions her own thoughts, convictions, excuses, motives, and emotions, and she questions those of her fellow human beings. Nothing that anyone tries to feed her as knowledge, wisdom, or (unproven) fact remains unquestioned. This makes her rather unpopular with most people and occasionally gets her into trouble even with friends.

One might say that Ruth Klueger thinks too much. But does she really? Reading this book, I have, instead, come to the conclusion that most other people think too little.

So, for instance: Is Germany really coming to terms with its past by sending conchies to whitewash fences in Auschwitz?

And what can a human conscience expect from its owner? Is cowardice the norm and the child of a natural instinct for survival? Yet where are the limits of cowardice? When does it become complicity of evil?

Ruth Klueger points out that the luck of the Holocaust survivors does not diminish the dimension of the crime. And she disallows that the survivors are being used as “credits” to be subtracted from the great “debit”. She writes:

“How can I keep you, the reader, from rejoicing with me, now that the gas chambers are no longer threatening me, and I am headed for a happy end of a post-war world that I am sharing with you … … … How can I keep you from breathing a sigh of relief?”

(Please note that the above is my own translation. Since I read the German original, I will refrain from quoting any more passages from the book, as my translation may differ from the English version.)

Needless to say that this book is thought-provoking because you will have guessed this by now. Will it activate everyone’s brain to think? No, it won’t. Some brains are not made for thinking.

Don’t believe it? Just read the praising reviews of “Er ist wieder da” (“Look Who’s Back”), a book that depicts Hitler as a somewhat likable curmudgeon; or better still, read my 1-star review of this book and the following war with commentators who think that Hitler lends himself as a comic figure. Here is the link:

https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...

(I read the German original, titled "Weiter leben: Eine Jugend”. The English title is “Still Alive”.)

It would be quite an understatement to say that this book is an excellent Holocaust memoir. You might as well describe Goethe's Faust as a captivating story about a sexual relationship gone bad.

"Weiter Leben" goes way beyond any Holocaust memoir I have read. If Primo Levy's "Survival in Auschwitz" goes deep into psychology and philosophy, this book digs even deeper. Yet I still found it easy to read. The psychology and philosophy of this book is smack on your head. It doesn't require the reader to be used to any psychological or philosophical terminology.

Ruth Klueger's sentence structures are a bit unusual, but readable, and her punctuation is, let's say, her own. Don't make the mistake and jump to the conclusion that this book needs more editing. It doesn't. I am positive that Ruth Klueger knows standard grammar and punctuation rules. Early on in this book, you will realize that Ruth Klueger has been born headstrong. Besides, I am rather sure that she has become allergic to rules and regulations. I don't blame her. Imagine having to suffer through all of the Nazis' senseless ordinances harassing Jews and then, of course, all the sadistic and dehumanizing enslavement in the concentration camps -- the senseless, torturing roll-calls, the humiliating nakedness during line-ups for showers, head-shavings, de-lousing, so-called medical examinations, and "selection" (which sorted for slave labor or gas chamber). Ruth Klueger no longer has to strip naked. But she does. Whereas Primo Levi bares his soul, Ruth Klueger strips hers naked.

During the first part of this book, covering Ruth Klueger’s childhood before the various concentration camps, I thought: ‘Oh, my! How can anyone be so negative? This child must have come out of her mother’s womb determined to become depressive and, apart from that, determined to aggravate every family member, relative, and family friend, within reach. Am I even going to like her?’ Yet I did come to like her, not always and in every situation, but certainly for the most part of this book.

Ruth Klueger questions everything. She questions her own thoughts, convictions, excuses, motives, and emotions, and she questions those of her fellow human beings. Nothing that anyone tries to feed her as knowledge, wisdom, or (unproven) fact remains unquestioned. This makes her rather unpopular with most people and occasionally gets her into trouble even with friends.

One might say that Ruth Klueger thinks too much. But does she really? Reading this book, I have, instead, come to the conclusion that most other people think too little.

So, for instance: Is Germany really coming to terms with its past by sending conchies to whitewash fences in Auschwitz?

And what can a human conscience expect from its owner? Is cowardice the norm and the child of a natural instinct for survival? Yet where are the limits of cowardice? When does it become complicity of evil?

Ruth Klueger points out that the luck of the Holocaust survivors does not diminish the dimension of the crime. And she disallows that the survivors are being used as “credits” to be subtracted from the great “debit”. She writes:

“How can I keep you, the reader, from rejoicing with me, now that the gas chambers are no longer threatening me, and I am headed for a happy end of a post-war world that I am sharing with you … … … How can I keep you from breathing a sigh of relief?”

(Please note that the above is my own translation. Since I read the German original, I will refrain from quoting any more passages from the book, as my translation may differ from the English version.)

Needless to say that this book is thought-provoking because you will have guessed this by now. Will it activate everyone’s brain to think? No, it won’t. Some brains are not made for thinking.

Don’t believe it? Just read the praising reviews of “Er ist wieder da” (“Look Who’s Back”), a book that depicts Hitler as a somewhat likable curmudgeon; or better still, read my 1-star review of this book and the following war with commentators who think that Hitler lends himself as a comic figure. Here is the link:

https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...

(I read the German original, titled "Weiter leben: Eine Jugend”. The English title is “Still Alive”.)

It would be quite an understatement to say that this book is an excellent Holocaust memoir. You might as well describe Goethe's Faust as a captivating story about a sexual relationship gone bad.

"Weiter Leben" goes way beyond any Holocaust memoir I have read. If Primo Levy's "Survival in Auschwitz" goes deep into psychology and philosophy, this book digs even deeper. Yet I still found it easy to read. The psychology and philosophy of this book is smack on your head. It doesn't require the reader to be used to any psychological or philosophical terminology.

Ruth Klueger's sentence structures are a bit unusual, but readable, and her punctuation is, let's say, her own. Don't make the mistake and jump to the conclusion that this book needs more editing. It doesn't. I am positive that Ruth Klueger knows standard grammar and punctuation rules. Early on in this book, you will realize that Ruth Klueger has been born headstrong. Besides, I am rather sure that she has become allergic to rules and regulations. I don't blame her. Imagine having to suffer through all of the Nazis' senseless ordinances harassing Jews and then, of course, all the sadistic and dehumanizing enslavement in the concentration camps -- the senseless, torturing roll-calls, the humiliating nakedness during line-ups for showers, head-shavings, de-lousing, so-called medical examinations, and "selection" (which sorted for slave labor or gas chamber). Ruth Klueger no longer has to strip naked. But she does. Whereas Primo Levi bares his soul, Ruth Klueger strips hers naked.

During the first part of this book, covering Ruth Klueger’s childhood before the various concentration camps, I thought: ‘Oh, my! How can anyone be so negative? This child must have come out of her mother’s womb determined to become depressive and, apart from that, determined to aggravate every family member, relative, and family friend, within reach. Am I even going to like her?’ Yet I did come to like her, not always and in every situation, but certainly for the most part of this book.

Ruth Klueger questions everything. She questions her own thoughts, convictions, excuses, motives, and emotions, and she questions those of her fellow human beings. Nothing that anyone tries to feed her as knowledge, wisdom, or (unproven) fact remains unquestioned. This makes her rather unpopular with most people and occasionally gets her into trouble even with friends.

One might say that Ruth Klueger thinks too much. But does she really? Reading this book, I have, instead, come to the conclusion that most other people think too little.

So, for instance: Is Germany really coming to terms with its past by sending conchies to whitewash fences in Auschwitz?

And what can a human conscience expect from its owner? Is cowardice the norm and the child of a natural instinct for survival? Yet where are the limits of cowardice? When does it become complicity of evil?

Ruth Klueger points out that the luck of the Holocaust survivors does not diminish the dimension of the crime. And she disallows that the survivors are being used as “credits” to be subtracted from the great “debit”. She writes:

“How can I keep you, the reader, from rejoicing with me, now that the gas chambers are no longer threatening me, and I am headed for a happy end of a post-war world that I am sharing with you … … … How can I keep you from breathing a sigh of relief?”

(Please note that the above is my own translation. Since I read the German original, I will refrain from quoting any more passages from the book, as my translation may differ from the English version.)

Needless to say that this book is thought-provoking because you will have guessed this by now. Will it activate everyone’s brain to think? No, it won’t. Some brains are not made for thinking.

Don’t believe it? Just read the praising reviews of “Er ist wieder da” (“Look Who’s Back”), a book that depicts Hitler as a somewhat likable curmudgeon; or better still, read my 1-star review of this book and the following war with commentators who think that Hitler lends himself as a comic figure. Here is the link:

https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...

(I read the German original, titled "Weiter leben: Eine Jugend”. The English title is “Still Alive”.)

It would be quite an understatement to say that this book is an excellent Holocaust memoir. You might as well describe Goethe's Faust as a captivating story about a sexual relationship gone bad.

"Weiter Leben" goes way beyond any Holocaust memoir I have read. If Primo Levy's "Survival in Auschwitz" goes deep into psychology and philosophy, this book digs even deeper. Yet I still found it easy to read. The psychology and philosophy of this book is smack on your head. It doesn't require the reader to be used to any psychological or philosophical terminology.

Ruth Klueger's sentence structures are a bit unusual, but readable, and her punctuation is, let's say, her own. Don't make the mistake and jump to the conclusion that this book needs more editing. It doesn't. I am positive that Ruth Klueger knows standard grammar and punctuation rules. Early on in this book, you will realize that Ruth Klueger has been born headstrong. Besides, I am rather sure that she has become allergic to rules and regulations. I don't blame her. Imagine having to suffer through all of the Nazis' senseless ordinances harassing Jews and then, of course, all the sadistic and dehumanizing enslavement in the concentration camps -- the senseless, torturing roll-calls, the humiliating nakedness during line-ups for showers, head-shavings, de-lousing, so-called medical examinations, and "selection" (which sorted for slave labor or gas chamber). Ruth Klueger no longer has to strip naked. But she does. Whereas Primo Levi bares his soul, Ruth Klueger strips hers naked.

During the first part of this book, covering Ruth Klueger’s childhood before the various concentration camps, I thought: ‘Oh, my! How can anyone be so negative? This child must have come out of her mother’s womb determined to become depressive and, apart from that, determined to aggravate every family member, relative, and family friend, within reach. Am I even going to like her?’ Yet I did come to like her, not always and in every situation, but certainly for the most part of this book.

Ruth Klueger questions everything. She questions her own thoughts, convictions, excuses, motives, and emotions, and she questions those of her fellow human beings. Nothing that anyone tries to feed her as knowledge, wisdom, or (unproven) fact remains unquestioned. This makes her rather unpopular with most people and occasionally gets her into trouble even with friends.

One might say that Ruth Klueger thinks too much. But does she really? Reading this book, I have, instead, come to the conclusion that most other people think too little.

So, for instance: Is Germany really coming to terms with its past by sending conchies to whitewash fences in Auschwitz?

And what can a human conscience expect from its owner? Is cowardice the norm and the child of a natural instinct for survival? Yet where are the limits of cowardice? When does it become complicity of evil?

Ruth Klueger points out that the luck of the Holocaust survivors does not diminish the dimension of the crime. And she disallows that the survivors are being used as “credits” to be subtracted from the great “debit”. She writes:

“How can I keep you, the reader, from rejoicing with me, now that the gas chambers are no longer threatening me, and I am headed for a happy end of a post-war world that I am sharing with you … … … How can I keep you from breathing a sigh of relief?”

(Please note that the above is my own translation. Since I read the German original, I will refrain from quoting any more passages from the book, as my translation may differ from the English version.)

Needless to say that this book is thought-provoking because you will have guessed this by now. Will it activate everyone’s brain to think? No, it won’t. Some brains are not made for thinking.

Don’t believe it? Just read the praising reviews of “Er ist wieder da” (“Look Who’s Back”), a book that depicts Hitler as a somewhat likable curmudgeon; or better still, read my 1-star review of this book and the following war with commentators who think that Hitler lends himself as a comic figure. Here is the link:

https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...

(I read the German original, titled "Weiter leben: Eine Jugend”. The English title is “Still Alive”.)

It would be quite an understatement to say that this book is an excellent Holocaust memoir. You might as well describe Goethe's Faust as a captivating story about a sexual relationship gone bad.

"Weiter Leben" goes way beyond any Holocaust memoir I have read. If Primo Levy's "Survival in Auschwitz" goes deep into psychology and philosophy, this book digs even deeper. Yet I still found it easy to read. The psychology and philosophy of this book is smack on your head. It doesn't require the reader to be used to any psychological or philosophical terminology.

Ruth Klueger's sentence structures are a bit unusual, but readable, and her punctuation is, let's say, her own. Don't make the mistake and jump to the conclusion that this book needs more editing. It doesn't. I am positive that Ruth Klueger knows standard grammar and punctuation rules. Early on in this book, you will realize that Ruth Klueger has been born headstrong. Besides, I am rather sure that she has become allergic to rules and regulations. I don't blame her. Imagine having to suffer through all of the Nazis' senseless ordinances harassing Jews and then, of course, all the sadistic and dehumanizing enslavement in the concentration camps -- the senseless, torturing roll-calls, the humiliating nakedness during line-ups for showers, head-shavings, de-lousing, so-called medical examinations, and "selection" (which sorted for slave labor or gas chamber). Ruth Klueger no longer has to strip naked. But she does. Whereas Primo Levi bares his soul, Ruth Klueger strips hers naked.

During the first part of this book, covering Ruth Klueger’s childhood before the various concentration camps, I thought: ‘Oh, my! How can anyone be so negative? This child must have come out of her mother’s womb determined to become depressive and, apart from that, determined to aggravate every family member, relative, and family friend, within reach. Am I even going to like her?’ Yet I did come to like her, not always and in every situation, but certainly for the most part of this book.

Ruth Klueger questions everything. She questions her own thoughts, convictions, excuses, motives, and emotions, and she questions those of her fellow human beings. Nothing that anyone tries to feed her as knowledge, wisdom, or (unproven) fact remains unquestioned. This makes her rather unpopular with most people and occasionally gets her into trouble even with friends.

One might say that Ruth Klueger thinks too much. But does she really? Reading this book, I have, instead, come to the conclusion that most other people think too little.

So, for instance: Is Germany really coming to terms with its past by sending conchies to whitewash fences in Auschwitz?

And what can a human conscience expect from its owner? Is cowardice the norm and the child of a natural instinct for survival? Yet where are the limits of cowardice? When does it become complicity of evil?

Ruth Klueger points out that the luck of the Holocaust survivors does not diminish the dimension of the crime. And she disallows that the survivors are being used as “credits” to be subtracted from the great “debit”. She writes:

“How can I keep you, the reader, from rejoicing with me, now that the gas chambers are no longer threatening me, and I am headed for a happy end of a post-war world that I am sharing with you … … … How can I keep you from breathing a sigh of relief?”

(Please note that the above is my own translation. Since I read the German original, I will refrain from quoting any more passages from the book, as my translation may differ from the English version.)

Needless to say that this book is thought-provoking because you will have guessed this by now. Will it activate everyone’s brain to think? No, it won’t. Some brains are not made for thinking.
Whitemaster
sehr lesenswert, meine beste Empfehlung.
Zulurr
A must for the post war generation !

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