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» » Linguistic Relativities: Language Diversity and Modern Thought
Linguistic Relativities: Language Diversity and Modern Thought e-book

Author:

John Leavitt

Language:

English

Category:

Reference

Subcategory:

Words Language & Grammar

ePub size:

1307 kb

Other formats:

lrf docx doc lrf

Rating:

4.7

Publisher:

Cambridge University Press (February 14, 2011)

Pages:

256

ISBN:

0521767822

Linguistic Relativities: Language Diversity and Modern Thought e-book

by John Leavitt


John Leavitt presents an elegant and persuasive revisionist history of the variable responses of linguists to the question of linguistic relativity in light of contemporary theoretical concerns, and explores the misreading of this position over the half-century since its classic anthropological.

John Leavitt presents an elegant and persuasive revisionist history of the variable responses of linguists to the question of linguistic relativity in light of contemporary theoretical concerns, and explores the misreading of this position over the half-century since its classic anthropological formulation

This book seeks to correct this misrepresentation and point to the new directions taken by the Boasians, directions . John Leavitt is a Professor in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Montréal. Библиографические данные.

This book seeks to correct this misrepresentation and point to the new directions taken by the Boasians, directions now being recovered in the most recent work in psychology and linguistics.

Cambridge Core - Linguistic Anthropology - Linguistic Relativities - by John Leavitt.

Linguistic Relativities book.

General Linguistics Books. Professor John Leavitt. This button opens a dialog that displays additional images for this product with the option to zoom in or out. Tell us if something is incorrect.

Welcome to e-content platform of John Benjamins Publishing Company. Volume 12, Issue 1. Article.

There are more than six thousand human languages, each one unique. For the last five hundred years, people have argued about how important language differences are. This book traces that history and shows how language differences have generally been treated either as of no importance or as all-important, depending on broader approaches taken to human life and knowledge. It was only in the twentieth century, in the work of Franz Boas and his students, that an attempt was made to engage seriously with the reality of language specificities. Since the 1950s, this work has been largely presented as yet another claim that language differences are all-important by cognitive scientists and philosophers who believe that such differences are of no importance. This book seeks to correct this misrepresentation and point to the new directions taken by the Boasians, directions now being recovered in the most recent work in psychology and linguistics.
Nirad
This is a completely fantastic book on the different schools of thought surrounding the nature of language: in short, are our thoughts, perceptions, and conceptualisations of the world determined, to a greater or lesser extent, by language (i.e. does language influence thought), or is there an essential nature to the human mind that will be expressed regardless of language. This is a complicated and nuanced debate, and the beauty of this book is that it explains and critiques the different hypotheses and historical approaches simply, clearly, in depth, and engagingly. An example of the very best kind of academic writing, and accessible to all readers.
Hamrl
I have neither purchased nor read it, but I found another Leavitt essay on the same topic to be clear and brilliant, and so I came looking for Linguistic Relativities, but alas, the price is forbidding. If you can afford, he will reward.

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