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» » Bernie Whitebear: An Urban Indian's Quest for Justice
Bernie Whitebear: An Urban Indian's Quest for Justice e-book

Author:

Lawney L. Reyes

Language:

English

Category:

Politics

Subcategory:

Social Sciences

ePub size:

1285 kb

Other formats:

azw docx lrf mbr

Rating:

4.1

Publisher:

University of Arizona Press; 1 edition (April 13, 2006)

Pages:

160

ISBN:

0816525218

Bernie Whitebear: An Urban Indian's Quest for Justice e-book

by Lawney L. Reyes


Sin Aikst Indian Bernie Whitebear was an urban activist in the Pacific Northwest during the last decades of the twentieth century, a man dedicated to improving the lives of Indians and other ethnic groups by working for change and justice.

Sin Aikst Indian Bernie Whitebear was an urban activist in the Pacific Northwest during the last decades of the twentieth century, a man dedicated to improving the lives of Indians and other ethnic groups by working for change and justice. He unified Northwest tribes to fight for the return of their land and was the first to accomplish this in the United States.

Lawney L. Reyes (Author) . Sin Aikst Indian Bernie Whitebear was an urban activist in the Pacific Northwest during the last decades of the twentieth century, a man dedicated to improving the lives of Indians and other ethnic groups by working for change and justice.

Lawney Reyes was born . 931 to Mary Christian, Sin Aikst (now known . 931 to Mary Christian, Sin Aikst (now known as the Sinixt). Among other things, it describes traditional tribal fishing at Kettle Falls on the Columbia River and living in Inchelium, Washington. His second book, Bernie Whitebear: An Urban Indian's Quest for Justice (2006), is a biography of his brother Bernie Whitebear (1937–2000).

Sin Aikst Indian Bernie Whitebear was an urban activist in the Pacific Northwest during the last decades of the twentieth century, a man dedicated to improving the lives of Indians and other ethnic. Finally an Indian was able to help his people. Very touching and makes me very proud of the Reyes/W. Published by Thriftbooks. com User, 10 years ago. Very touching and brings back a lot of memories. I wish I could have met Bernie. DayBreak Star facility is wonderful for the people. I hope they can continue to keep this spirit of achievement going.

Lawney Reyes gives a firsthand description of some of the characters and incidents surrounding the battle for Native American . Only 2 left in stock (more on the way)

Lawney Reyes gives a firsthand description of some of the characters and incidents surrounding the battle for Native American fishing rights in the 1950s and 1960s near Tacoma. Only 2 left in stock (more on the way). Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).

This book offers a nice counterpart to drier stories of reclamation and is a quick read that . Aug 2019 - University of Washington Press.

This book offers a nice counterpart to drier stories of reclamation and is a quick read that would be suitable in classes on Native Studies, memory, biography, and history. -Oregon Historical Quarterly. grieves for the tranquil and nature-bound culture of the Indian village but relates, in the voice of an excited child, his delight at watching life in a rip-roaring Western boomtown that everyone knew was temporary.

White Grizzly Bear's Legacy. In his distinctive voice, Lawney Reyes, grandson of Pic Ah Kelowna or White Grizzly Bear of the Sin Aikst, relates the history of his family and his people. I walked across the highway and stood on the bank overlooking Lake Roosevelt. The Sin Aikst are now known as the Lakes tribe, absorbed into the Colville Confederated Tribes of eastern Washington. And where Kettle Falls once flowed and the Sin Aikst once fished are places that exist now only in memory, flooded when the Grand Coulee Dam was completed in 1942. Reyes (born c. 1931 in Bend, Oregon) (Sin-Aikst) is an American Indian artist . His second book, Bernie Whitebear: An Urban Indian's Quest for Justice (2006), is a biography of his brother Bernie Whitebear (1937–2000)

Lawney L. 1931 in Bend, Oregon) (Sin-Aikst) is an American Indian artist, curator and memoirist based in Seattle, Washington. He was one of the so-called "Gang of Four" or "Four Amigos" who founded Seattle's Minority Executive Directors' Coalition. Reyes' third book, B Street: A Gathering of Saints and Sinners (2008), is an exploration of the Grand Coulee area between 1933 and 1941, during the construction of the Dam. It was published by the University of Washington Press.

Author Reyes ( Bernie Whitebear: An Urban Indian’s Quest for Justice ) lives in Seattle. The fifth and final volume in the Seattle fantasy author’s epic series, The Marq’ssan Cycle. The setting: a late-21st-century America where ideological battles continue to unfold.

Contents may have variations from the printed book or be incomplete or contain other . Senijextee Indians - Biography. Indians of North America - Washington (State) - Politics and government.

Contents may have variations from the printed book or be incomplete or contain other coding. Indians of North America - Washington (State) - Social conditions.

When American Indians left reservations in the 1950s, enticed by the federal government’s relocation program, many were drawn to cities like Tacoma and Seattle. But in these new homes they found unemployment and discrimination, and they were no better off. Sin Aikst Indian Bernie Whitebear was an urban activist in the Pacific Northwest during the last decades of the twentieth century, a man dedicated to improving the lives of Indians and other ethnic groups by working for change and justice. He unified Northwest tribes to fight for the return of their land and was the first to accomplish this in the United States. But far from a fearsome agitator, Bernie was a persuasive figure who won the praise and admiration of an entire community. Bernie began organizing powwows in the 1960s with an eye toward greater authenticity; and by making a name in the Seattle area as an entertainment promoter, he soon became a successful networker and master of diplomacy, enabling him to win over those who had long ignored the problems of urban Indians. Soft-spoken but outspoken, Bernie successfully negotiated with officials at all levels of government on behalf of Indians and other minorities, crossing into political territory normally off-limits to his people. Bernie Whitebear’s story takes readers from an impoverished youth—including a rare account of life on the Colville Reservation during the 1930s—to the “Red Power” movement as it traces Bernie’s emergence as an activist influenced by contemporaries such as Bob Satiacum, Vine DeLoria, and Joe Delacruz. By choosing this course, Bernie was clearly making a break with his past, but with an eye toward a better future, whether staging the successful protest at Fort Lawton or acting on behalf of Native fishing rights in Puget Sound. When he died in July 2000, Bernie Whitebear had left an inestimable legacy, accomplishing things that no other Indian seemed able to do. His biography is an inspiring story for readers at many levels, an account of how one American Indian overcame hardships and obstacles to make a difference in the lives of his people—and an entire community.
Mezilabar
I really liked this book! Of course, I found it particularly exceptional because I knew (used to work with) Lawney. So interesting to learn about his early years along with those of Bernie Whitebear and the hurdles and hardships they both overcame to become very successful in different ways. It is a well-written book and easy to read; I definitely recommend it.
Vushura
I loved this story of an important man who helped promote resources and rights of first peoples in the north west.
Na
Very good! Thank you!
caif
This seller sent my book on time and I was satisfied with the book not being damaged. Basically, the seller well described how the book descriptions were. :)
Zicelik
I knew Bernie Whitebear while I was a teenager in Seattle and he was the first Urban Indian leader I had met. Over the course of time, I found him to be a person who mentored youth and he was a visionary in a very enlightening period for Urban Indians in Seattle. His perseverance and dedication is a testament to his character and reading the book written by Lawney, his brother, about their upbringing makes all the pieces in the puzzle fit and make sense. He came from a humble background (perhaps "poor" as far as wealth) but also one that was rich in morals, values, traditions and culture. This book was a very good read.
Vinainl
Very touching and brings back a lot of memories. I wish I could have met Bernie. DayBreak Star facility is wonderful for the people. I hope they can continue to keep this spirit of achievement going. When you consider the 3 Reyes children coming from a poor reservation, and perservering to get their educations, and giving back like they did, it is a joy to think of. I hope our people will be touched by the achievements and consider striving for their own goals.
Dishadel
The author is justly proud of his brother "Bernie Whitebear". The book provides many facts and stories of Whitebear's accomplishments in fighting for Indian rights. Many of these facts can be be authenticated by going on-line and reading newspaper articles from that time.

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