ComicsChildrenHumorFitnessReferenceITLawCookingHobbiesTeachingSelf-HelpPhotoFantasyHistoryTestsCalendarsFictionLGBTTeenagersTransportMemorisMedicineMysteryRelationshipsPoliticsBusinessSpiritualityRomanceBiblesMathSportTravelOtherNo category
» » The Girls in the Van: A Reporter's Diary of the Campaign Trail
The Girls in the Van: A Reporter's Diary of the Campaign Trail e-book

Author:

Beth Harpaz

Language:

English

Category:

Politics

Subcategory:

Politics & Government

ePub size:

1606 kb

Other formats:

mbr azw lrf rtf

Rating:

4.4

Publisher:

St. Martin's Griffin; First Edition, First Printing edition (November 20, 2002)

Pages:

304

ISBN:

0312302711

The Girls in the Van: A Reporter's Diary of the Campaign Trail e-book

by Beth Harpaz


Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking The Girls in the Van: A Reporter's Diary of the Campaign Trail as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Believe it or not, it actually led me to respect Lazio more, even though I didn't vote for him.

You wanna go forward, you put it in D - Evolution time line - The sound of Hillary listening - You people in the media - A normal campaign - What's the lead? -.

Beth Harpaz provides an inciteful view of the campaign trail. While reading the book we are provided with a view of how Hilary's campaign responded to the various crisises and questions raised by the Giuliani/Lazio campaigns. We are also delighted by Beth's struggles to balance our homelife with the 24/7 life of the campaign. We are enlightened about Hillary but the real winner is Beth and her two sons. Fun and Insight on the Campaign Trail with Hillary. com User, November 7, 2001

Reporter Beth J. Harpaz was there, covering this political whirlwind for The Associated Press, and her book, The Girls in the Van revisits every key moment of the race

Reporter Beth J. Harpaz was there, covering this political whirlwind for The Associated Press, and her book, The Girls in the Van revisits every key moment of the race.

a reporter's diary of the campaign trail. Published 2001 by Thomas Dunne Books in New York. 1st ed. by Beth J. Harpaz. Politics and government, In library, Women in politics, Career in politics, Protected DAISY, United States, Women political candidates, Biography, Elections, 2000, Women journalists, Presidents' spouses, Women, United States. Senate, Political activity, Press and politics.

Reporter Beth J. Harpaz was there, covering this political whirlwind for The Associated Press, and her book, Candidate Hillary, previously published as The Girls in the Van, revisits every key moment of the race.

The Girls in the Van: Covering Hillary, Thomas Dunne Books (New York, NY), 2001, published as The Girls in the Van: A Reporter's Diary of the Campaign Trail, 2002. Finding Annie Farrell: A Family Memoir, St. Martin's Press (New York, NY), 2004. SIDELIGHTS: Beth J. Harpaz's The Girls in the Van: Covering Hillary offers a behind-the-scenes look at Hillary Clinton's successful run for the . Senate, as well as provide readers with insight into the day-today gossip, political maneuvering, awkward missteps, and inside jokes of that election.

Beth J. Harpaz is on leave from her job as a reporter for The Associated Press, which she joined in 1988 after working for the Staten Island Advance and The Record of Hackensack, New Jersey. She has won feature-writing awards from the New York Press Club and The Newswomen’s Club of New York. Her book, The Girls in the Van: Covering Hillary (St. Martin’s Press), chronicles Hillary Clinton’s senate campaign, which Harpaz covered for The . Her second book, Finding Annie Farrell, the true story of five sisters from Maine, is due out in 2003.

Magazine article Nieman Reports (I later sent Clinton a copy of my book about the campaign, so I figure.

Magazine article Nieman Reports. Girls in the Van': What Happened When a Lot of Women Journalists Reported on Hillary Clinton's Campaign? (Women: United States). Still, I worried that any small kindness the campaign showed towards my children might compromise my integrity. When Clinton surprised me with a copy of her book, "Dear Socks, Dear Buddy," inscribed to my boys, I sweated buckets worrying that it was an ethical lapse to take her gift. I immediately turned it over to my boss. I later sent Clinton a copy of my book about the campaign, so I figure we're even.

Harpaz talked about her new book, The Girls in the Van: Covering Hillary, published by St. Martins Press. The book is the story of the reporters assigned to cover Hillary Rodham Clinton during her run for the Senate in 2000, describing the campaign from the perspective of those journalists stationed in the press van. The author talked about behind-the-scenes events and topics such as Yiddish lessons, potty-training, and Yasir Arafat. After her presentation, the author answered questions from members of the audience. Ms. Harpaz talked about her new book, The Girls in the Van: Covering Hillary,.

The Girls in the Van is the ultimate press pass to Hillary Clinton's historic Senate run, following the first lady from the moment she dons a black pantsuit and a Yankees cap all the way to her historic victory. This book is a front-row seat in the press van as Hillary takes a "My Fair Lady" -style Yiddish lesson, invokes Harriet Tubman thirty times on a tour of black churches, and spends as much time explaining why she kissed Yassir Arafat's wife as she does justifying why she stays married to Bill. The Girls in the Van takes you on an unforgettable trip, from the ladies room at the Waldorf to the garden of the Clinton's Westchester home.
Carrot
I was asked to review this book by a local reading group interested in Women in Politics. I read it, and quite frankly, I got it. Ms. Harpaz, in journalistic fashion, wrote about her journey and her experiences on this campaign trail. That the author had quite a bit of work/life balance issues, and wrote about them in this book, is really the gist of the book and speaks to the core of the Senator's values. Whether Ms. Harpaz intended it or not, the working wife/mother "thing" is something that so many of us women share, but really can't say that we have in common with Senatory Hilary Rodham-Clinton. If you are a big fan of Hilary Clinton and are looking for all you can read, positive, on the current Senator from New York, then this book is not for you. It's far more balanced than that. If you're an open-minded working mother (whether working in or out of the home) and are interested in reading a non-biased, experience based book about Senator Clinton and how her values and ideals fit with yours (or don't), then this book is definitely for you. That Senator Clinton could be a Presidential candidate in 2008, or considered for a seat on the Supreme Court, should be of vast interest to you as a working mother and/or wife.

I didn't think the book was so negative at all, but it did spotlight a the character of the Senator. For those who hated the book, I recommend you read it without personal bias.
Chinon
Having witnessed and to a very small degree participated in Hillary Clinton's 2000 senate campaign from my perch in Buffalo, I have been looking for a good chronicle and analysis of the experience. After reading both HILLARY'S TURN and THE GIRLS IN THE VAN, I am still looking. THE GIRLS IN THE VAN is breezy and interesting, but it leaves far too much out (especially most of the upstate campaign). Harpaz's book is as much or more about her experience as a reporter than the campaign itself. It wouldn't have taken much effort to turn the book into an argument about...something, but it isn't that either. Consequently, there was surprising little sense of progression for a campaign book - I wasn't looking forward to the next chapter as much as I would have liked to have been.
Campaigns lend themselves well to stories because the author doesn't need to think much about the beginning, middle and end - those are all unmistakable as the course of events unfolds. The best campaign book I've read recently was the little known, RUNNING WITH THE MACHINE, by Dan Lynch. That seemed to be about something, this one didn't. HILLARY'S TURN captures the spirit of the campaign better, but still misses much of the upstate detail. Perhaps the problem has to do with downstate reporters simply pulling together their notes rather than researching the campaign beyond what they witnessed. That may have been what happened here. There remains a really good book waiting to be written about this campaign.
Iell
What was I thinking reading this book? I basically just wanted a humorous and light recount of the race. Do I really care about New York politics, not really, what I am interested in is the detail of Hilary Clinton and her race. What was it like for a First Lady to run for the Senate? What I got was a book that was 1/3 complaining about long work hours, 1/3 complaining about the basics of a campaign and 1/3 complaining about Hilary. This author has every right to write a book as negative as she has about the candidate, but to be fair, I just did not get the level of dislike for Mrs. Clinton from the dust jacket as I did while reading the book. If the dust jacket would have been honist, I never would have bought the book.
To be honist with you I only completed 2/3 of the book, it got to be so repetitious with the whining and complaining that I had to put it down. I do not know if the author thought it was humorous or if this was just a 300 page diatribe about how this author disliked Hilary. If the purpose of the book was to talk about the author's dislike of Hilary then why did she cover just the minor issues she did? Lets be fair, whether they are fair or not, there are a number of bigger issues one could dredge up ... It just came off as petty. Overall I would not suggest spending the time on this book.
Irostamore
I didn't see this book as one that would give me great insight into Hillary Clinton. (I honestly don't think that book exists.) To some extent, it did explain how she won her first Senate race in NY-- by working harder than anyone else in the race, by taking the time to learn what the people of NY cared about and then talking to them about those things.

More importantly, what the book did impart (intentionally, or not) was a valuable look at the press covering Hillary Clinton and why and how they cover her (and other candidates) the way they do. In fact, I think the book is important reading for anyone who wants to understand the dynamics of the press corps in a campaign-- who the press likes, who the press hates, and why.
Grokinos
Poor Beth Harpaz! Hillary didn't act like a "real" New York candidate! She wasn't available 24/7 like Al D'amato. She didn't get all chummy with the press like Chuck Schumer. And she CERTAINLY didn't give them access to her daughter like Rick Lazio. And the worst part? She didn't give them anything more than canned events to cover! By the end of the campaign, they could repeat most of her speechs along with her! In fact, she generated so little "real" news that all Ms. Harpaz can do is whine. About the lack of availability, the uncomfortable accomadations (or lack thereof), the fact that she missed spending a few nights with her own kids because she was forced to stand around hoping (usually in vain) that Hillary would talk to her.
I couldn't even finish this book! (and I assure you, I've waded through quite a bit of garbage!) Harpaz seems to despise everything about Clinton. She mocks everything from her message to her accent. And as far as working long hours, isn't that what reporters who cover campaigns do?
Do yourself a favor, if you want to find out about the Clinton campaign, go look up old NY Times articles. Don't waste your time on this book.
Beydar
I was asked to review this book by a local reading group interested in Women in Politics. I read it, and quite frankly, I got it. Ms. Harpaz, in journalistic fashion, wrote about her journey and her experiences on this campaign trail. That the author had quite a bit of work/life balance issues, and wrote about them in this book, is really the gist of the book and speaks to the core of the Senator's values. Whether Ms. Harpaz intended it or not, the working wife/mother "thing" is something that so many of us women share, but really can't say that we have in common with Senatory Hilary Rodham-Clinton. If you are a big fan of Hilary Clinton and are looking for all you can read, positive, on the current Senator from New York, then this book is not for you. It's far more balanced than that. If you're an open-minded working mother (whether working in or out of the home) and are interested in reading a non-biased, experience based book about Senator Clinton and how her values and ideals fit with yours (or don't), then this book is definitely for you. That Senator Clinton could be a Presidential candidate in 2008, or considered for a seat on the Supreme Court, should be of vast interest to you as a working mother and/or wife.

I didn't think the book was so negative at all, but it did spotlight a the character of the Senator. For those who hated the book, I recommend you read it without personal bias.
Corgustari
Having witnessed and to a very small degree participated in Hillary Clinton's 2000 senate campaign from my perch in Buffalo, I have been looking for a good chronicle and analysis of the experience. After reading both HILLARY'S TURN and THE GIRLS IN THE VAN, I am still looking. THE GIRLS IN THE VAN is breezy and interesting, but it leaves far too much out (especially most of the upstate campaign). Harpaz's book is as much or more about her experience as a reporter than the campaign itself. It wouldn't have taken much effort to turn the book into an argument about...something, but it isn't that either. Consequently, there was surprising little sense of progression for a campaign book - I wasn't looking forward to the next chapter as much as I would have liked to have been.
Campaigns lend themselves well to stories because the author doesn't need to think much about the beginning, middle and end - those are all unmistakable as the course of events unfolds. The best campaign book I've read recently was the little known, RUNNING WITH THE MACHINE, by Dan Lynch. That seemed to be about something, this one didn't. HILLARY'S TURN captures the spirit of the campaign better, but still misses much of the upstate detail. Perhaps the problem has to do with downstate reporters simply pulling together their notes rather than researching the campaign beyond what they witnessed. That may have been what happened here. There remains a really good book waiting to be written about this campaign.
What was I thinking reading this book? I basically just wanted a humorous and light recount of the race. Do I really care about New York politics, not really, what I am interested in is the detail of Hilary Clinton and her race. What was it like for a First Lady to run for the Senate? What I got was a book that was 1/3 complaining about long work hours, 1/3 complaining about the basics of a campaign and 1/3 complaining about Hilary. This author has every right to write a book as negative as she has about the candidate, but to be fair, I just did not get the level of dislike for Mrs. Clinton from the dust jacket as I did while reading the book. If the dust jacket would have been honist, I never would have bought the book.
To be honist with you I only completed 2/3 of the book, it got to be so repetitious with the whining and complaining that I had to put it down. I do not know if the author thought it was humorous or if this was just a 300 page diatribe about how this author disliked Hilary. If the purpose of the book was to talk about the author's dislike of Hilary then why did she cover just the minor issues she did? Lets be fair, whether they are fair or not, there are a number of bigger issues one could dredge up ... It just came off as petty. Overall I would not suggest spending the time on this book.
I didn't see this book as one that would give me great insight into Hillary Clinton. (I honestly don't think that book exists.) To some extent, it did explain how she won her first Senate race in NY-- by working harder than anyone else in the race, by taking the time to learn what the people of NY cared about and then talking to them about those things.

More importantly, what the book did impart (intentionally, or not) was a valuable look at the press covering Hillary Clinton and why and how they cover her (and other candidates) the way they do. In fact, I think the book is important reading for anyone who wants to understand the dynamics of the press corps in a campaign-- who the press likes, who the press hates, and why.
Poor Beth Harpaz! Hillary didn't act like a "real" New York candidate! She wasn't available 24/7 like Al D'amato. She didn't get all chummy with the press like Chuck Schumer. And she CERTAINLY didn't give them access to her daughter like Rick Lazio. And the worst part? She didn't give them anything more than canned events to cover! By the end of the campaign, they could repeat most of her speechs along with her! In fact, she generated so little "real" news that all Ms. Harpaz can do is whine. About the lack of availability, the uncomfortable accomadations (or lack thereof), the fact that she missed spending a few nights with her own kids because she was forced to stand around hoping (usually in vain) that Hillary would talk to her.
I couldn't even finish this book! (and I assure you, I've waded through quite a bit of garbage!) Harpaz seems to despise everything about Clinton. She mocks everything from her message to her accent. And as far as working long hours, isn't that what reporters who cover campaigns do?
Do yourself a favor, if you want to find out about the Clinton campaign, go look up old NY Times articles. Don't waste your time on this book.

e-Books related to The Girls in the Van: A Reporter's Diary of the Campaign Trail