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» » Peripheral Visions: Learning Along the Way
Peripheral Visions: Learning Along the Way e-book

Author:

Mary Catherine Bateson

Language:

English

Category:

Politics

Subcategory:

Anthropology

ePub size:

1329 kb

Other formats:

txt azw mbr lrf

Rating:

4.2

Publisher:

Harpercollins; 1st edition (June 1, 1994)

Pages:

243

ISBN:

0060168595

Peripheral Visions: Learning Along the Way e-book

by Mary Catherine Bateson


Mary Catherine Bateson's life has not been a smooth succession of triumphs, but like the rest of us,good and bad .

Mary Catherine Bateson's life has not been a smooth succession of triumphs, but like the rest of us,good and bad choices with consequences. Her honest, even blunt recitation of what happened to her and the countries she lived in ( US, Philippines,Iran ) demonstrate her insights as an anthropologist as well as her personal feelings of betrayal, insights, and triumphs despite 'bumps on the road. Mary Catherine Bateson presents learning as something directly related to the capacity to enjoy life; learning as an activity pursued throughout life, having only a tenuous connection with school as such.

Bateson, Mary Catherine. Encourages new habits of learning by discovering pattern in the unfamiliar, treating it as a resource rather than a threat. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

Mary Catherine Bateson encourages the reader to cast aside familiar habits of learning and interacting so as to engage more .

Mary Catherine Bateson encourages the reader to cast aside familiar habits of learning and interacting so as to engage more successfully with the unexpected and participate in the diverse world which surrounds us. The key to her vision of learning is the discovery of pattern in the unfamiliar, treating it as a resource rather than a threat. Every new situation we encounter is laden with meanings - some immediately obvious, and others lying at the edge of awareness that are only visible later or out of the corner of the eye, through peripheral vision.

Peripheral Visions book.

Peripheral Visions: Learning Along the Wa. Peripheral Visions - Mary C. Bateson.

Peripheral Visions: Learning Along the Way. by Mary C. Mary Catherine Bateson, author of Composing a Life, is our guide on a fascinating intellectual exploration of lifetime learning from experience and encountering the unfamiliar. Peripheral Visions begins with a sacrifice in a Persian garden, moving on to a Philippine village and then to the Sinai desert, and concludes with a description of a tour bus full of Tibetan monks.

Bateson is a noted author in her field with many published monographs Peripheral Visions - Learning Along the Way (1994). Composing a Life (1991).

Bateson is a noted author in her field with many published monographs. Among her books is With a Daughter's Eye: A Memoir of Margaret Mead and Gregory Bateson, a recounting of her upbringing by two famous parents. She has taught at Harvard, Amherst, and George Mason University, among others. Bateson is a fellow of the International Leadership Forum and was president of the Institute for Intercultural Studies in New York until 2010. Peripheral Visions - Learning Along the Way (1994). Thinking AIDS (1988) with Richard Goldsby.

Mary Catherine Bateson, author of Composing a Life, is our guide on a fascinating intellectual exploration of lifetime learning from experience and encountering the unfamiliar.

I am grateful for having read this, as I am a new grandmother and will use what I have learned from Bateson’s writings.

Peripheral visons: Learning along the way 2 Mary Catherine Bateson writes her book, Peripheral Visions: Learning Along the Way, with both grace and adept use of dialect. The pages are filled with illustrations of her experiences, beginning with a very poignant description of a sheep being sacrificed in a Persian garden while she holds her two-year-old daughter, allowing her to witness the entire event. Bateson mentions something in the very first chapter I feel certain will remain in my memory forever. I am grateful for having read this, as I am a new grandmother and will use what I have learned from Bateson’s writings. TERM Summer '17. PROFESSOR Michelle Bartlett.

Peripheral Visions by Mary Catherine Bateson Although the matter is very weighty, PERIPHERAL VISIONS is written in a easily readable style.

Peripheral Visions by Mary Catherine Bateson. The subtitle of her newest book, Learning Along the Way, summarizes much of the main message in this intellectual exploration. Bateson argues convincingly that individuals should approach their life experiences, not in set patterns created at an early age that are simply applied over and over again, but with a willingness to improvise and continue to learn new ways of seeing. Although the matter is very weighty, PERIPHERAL VISIONS is written in a easily readable style.

Mary Catherine Bateson is a social anthropologist and linguist. Peripheral visions: Learning along the way. New York: HarperCollins. Bateson, M. C. (2000).

The author of Composing a Life provides a thought-provoking study of the art of learning that explains how a continuation of the learning process throughout a lifetime adds pleasure and understanding to human life and helps ensure the future. $60,000 ad/promo. Tour.
Hellstaff
This book deserves more than five stars. It is an effective and eloquent statement of how to create personal growth through lifelong learning. The writing style of the book exemplifies the author's thesis in an effective and satisfying way.
Try this experiment. Ask someone to concentrate on everything that is red in the room for 60 seconds. Then ask the person to close her or his eyes. Then ask the person to tell you everything in the room that is yellow. He or she will struggle.
Focus helps us to see what we focus on, but causes us to miss most of the rest. Focus comes from our cultural preferences, our sense of attractiveness, and our expectations. Professor Bateson effectively shows us how to unfocus so that our peripheral vision becomes our primary way of sensing the visual and mental worlds around us.
Peripheral vision has several advantages. It can capture more than one event at the same time. It also covers a wider field of range. And biologically, we know that our eyes perceive images better at the periphery than at the center (thus, why the reading lenses in bifocals are at the bottom of the glasses).
Mentally, the same thing happens. A further advantage is that we are more likely to liberate the processes of the unconscious mind by considering things more obliquely. Walking away from issues to let them stew is a good example.
The book gently leads the reader into this perception through a series of examples that spiral and recur onto one another, until Professor Bateson's examples become our own. These experiences begin with her taking her young daughter to a ritual slaughtering of a sheep in Iran, connect to her high school years as a gentile in Israel, touch on her research in the rural parts of the Philippines, and run through her two months at an artists' colony in New Hampshire.
Professor Bateson (and we, as her invited guests) become outsiders in these circumstances, but with a guide to help us see the alternative perceptions of the same events. Then, she follows a winding path (like the spiral of a Nautilus shell) back into the center of what all this means.
Continuing to consider sight, she also helps us to see that we are blind when we have only one perspective. Yet it is difficult to overcome that pespective on our own, so we are likely to remain blind. The cure: experience events as people from other cultures do in a nonjudgmental way. This is a sort of psychological "monkey see, monkey do" type of learning, and I agree that the jolt of this fresh vision should work.
My main concern after reading this book is how I can hope to become such an acute observer without being a trained anthropologist born into a family of two genius parents. I suppose I'll just have to work at it harder. Certainly, I came away with the concept that I need to immerse myself in other cultures rather than just live like an American when I travel around. In the same way that half of my reading each year is outside of my fields of expertise, it sounds like I need to get a high percentage of my life experiences in environments dominated by people with different assumptions and perceptions than my own. Hmmmm. Sounds like fun!
Now that I've got the basic concept, I do wish she had provided a few more guideposts for the individual learner. The ones she does provide are very helpful, addressing sex-based, religion-based, geography-based, and culture-based differences. I wonder what other ones there are.
For those who are interested in what multiculturalism should mean, there is a fine discussion of the roles of multicultural experience that emphasizes the potential for learning rather than merely creating self-confidence. I also liked that she doesn't believe the term is a good one, and does some definitional work on the subject.
The book comes from her personal perspective in many places, and you may not agree with her. Rather than having that repulse you, I suggest that you go with the spirit of the book and try to fit inside her perspective and see what you can learn from it.
After enjoying this wonderful book, I suggest that you plan a vacation where you can experience first-hand a culture much different than your own or one that you have experienced before. Perhaps you should do what Henry James suggested, and simply travel to an uncertain destination until you can go no more and stop there. Then live as the people there live. And use Professor Bateson's example to see and think as the people there do. Then, come back to your own culture and see it in two ways now. Then add a third perspective, and so on. Eventually, the overlap of these perspectives will provide you with a new focus on the core of what is important and real.
Overcome your own blinders to truly see all the potential around and within you!
nailer
Mary Catherine Bateson's life has not been a smooth succession of triumphs, but like the rest of us,good and bad choices with consequences. Her honest, even blunt recitation of what happened to her and the countries she lived in ( US, Philippines,Iran ) demonstrate her insights as an anthropologist as well as her personal feelings of betrayal, insights, and triumphs despite 'bumps on the road.' Reading Peripheral Visions is a refreshing look at our times where individuals are forced to adapt, whether in
their own country, or by living ( not touristing ) abroad. Her stories of worship in different religious centers,of contrasting an Iranian 10-month old baby's behavior vs. an American of the same age, as well as the reactions of her Iranian students are indeed a microcosm of what she calls "learning along the way." Her acceptance of Erik Erikson's schema of eight identity crises in life captures her journey from a high schooler taking a year in Israel to a "wise old woman" ( C.G.Jung) teaching in American universities. Would we were all as warm-hearted and wise as she.
Oghmaghma
There are no words from this reader to extend to a potential reader that will elevate this book by Dr. Bateson to where it should be on your list. Her style, her choice of words..the simplicity of the message, the stories of her life, family, travels - and learning. A magnificent book and rates 100% for a trip through the garden of wisdom with a great thinker and seer and interpreter! thank you, Mary Catherine Bateson!
This is a stimulating and very interesting-compelling read!
Kulalbine
An outstanding read on the nature of education and learning all along the way.
Modimeena
Great understandings, Mary has. A book about learning through cultures, other people, your own experiences. I am trying to read 100 books in a year. Of the 65ish I have read so far... this book is in the top three! Get it, read it, enjoy!
Delan
Not bad.
Uickabrod
The utter simplicity of this book is deceptive. The ideas go very deep and are shattering in their implications. Yet they are proffered like cookies with afternoon tea.
Mary Catherine Bateson presents learning as something directly related to the capacity to enjoy life; learning as an activity pursued throughout life, having only a tenuous connection with school as such. The quotes below give you a flavor of the depth of her reflections and of the pithyness of her expression.
"Increasingly, we will cease to focus on learning as preliminary and see it threaded through other layers of experience, offering one of life's great pleasures."
"The capacity to enjoy, to value one experience over another, is the precondition of the capacity to learn."
"Looking, listening and learning offer the modern equivalent of moving through life as a pilgrimage."
"It is hard to think of learning more fundamental to the shape of society than learning whether to trust or distrust others."
"Human beings construct meaning as spiders make webs."
"The solution is to take responsibility for the choice of metaphors, to savor them and ponder their suggestions, above all to live with many and take no one metaphor as absolute."
"School casts a shadow on all subsequent learning. Trying to understand learning by studying schooling is rather like trying to understand sexuality by studying bordellos."
"Not only don't we know what we know, we don't know what we teach."
"Most of the learning of a lifetime, including much of what is learned in school, never shows up in a curriculum."

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