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» » The Soul of Man (Dodo Press)
The Soul of Man (Dodo Press) e-book

Author:

Oscar Wilde

Language:

English

Category:

Other

Subcategory:

Social Sciences

ePub size:

1333 kb

Other formats:

lrf docx mobi lit

Rating:

4.5

Publisher:

Dodo Press (October 21, 2008)

Pages:

52

ISBN:

1409926737

The Soul of Man (Dodo Press) e-book

by Oscar Wilde


Home Oscar Wilde Miscellaneous Aphorisms; The Soul of Ma. The play was passed for press, however, by no less a writer than Marcel Schwob whose letter to the Paris publisher, returning the proofs and mentioning two or three slight alterations, is still in my possession.

Home Oscar Wilde Miscellaneous Aphorisms; The Soul of Man. Home, . Miscellaneous Aphorisms; The Soul of Man, . Marcel Schwob told me some years afterwards that he thought it would have spoiled the spontaneity and character of Wilde's style if he had tried to harmonise it with the diction demanded by the French Academy. It was never composed with any idea of presentation.

81 quotes from The Soul of Man Under Socialism: ‘Art is the most intense mode of individualism that the world has known. The Soul of Man Under Socialism Quotes Showing 1-30 of 81. Art is the most intense mode of individualism that the world has known. Oscar Wilde, The Soul of Man Under Socialism. tags: art, individualism.

Book digitized by Google from the library of Harvard University and uploaded to the Internet Archive by user tpb.

Oscar Wilde You can read The Soul of Man Under Socialism by Oscar Wilde in our library for absolutely free. Read various fiction books with us in our e-reader.

Oscar Fingal O’Flahertie Wills Wilde (1854-1900) was an Irish play. Wilde made his reputation in the theatre world with a series of highly popular plays. Lady Windermere’s Fan (1893) like many of Wilde’s comedies is a biting satire on the morals of Victorian society, particularly marriage

Oscar Fingal O’Flahertie Wills Wilde (1854-1900) was an Irish play. Lady Windermere’s Fan (1893) like many of Wilde’s comedies is a biting satire on the morals of Victorian society, particularly marriage. A Woman of No Importance (1893) is a testimony of Wilde’s wit and his brand of dark comedy. An Ideal Husband (1895) revolves around blackmail and political corruption, and touches on the themes of public and private honour. The Importance of Being Earnest (1895) is one of his best loved plays, a comedy of manners.

The Soul of Man under Socialism" is an 1891 essay by Oscar Wilde in which he expounds a libertarian socialist worldview and a critique of charity

The Soul of Man under Socialism" is an 1891 essay by Oscar Wilde in which he expounds a libertarian socialist worldview and a critique of charity. The writing of "The Soul of Man" followed Wilde's conversion to anarchist philosophy, following his reading of the works of Peter Kropotkin.

The Soul of Man under Socialism. One fee. Stacks of books. Read whenever, wherever. Your phone is always with you, so your books are too – even when you’re offline.

Oscar Wilde Among his other notable writing is The Soul of Man under Socialism (1891), which argues for individualism and freedom of artistic.

Large format for easy reading. In 1891 Wilde published A House of Pomegranates, a collection of fantasy tales, and in 1892 gained commercial and critical success with his play, Lady Windermere's Fan He followed this comedy with A Woman of No Importance (1893), An Ideal Husband (1895), and his most famous play, The Importance of Being Earnest (1895). Among his other notable writing is The Soul of Man under Socialism (1891), which argues for individualism and freedom of artistic expression.

The writing of "The Soul of Man" followed Wilde's conversion to anarchist philosophy, following his reading of. .

The writing of "The Soul of Man" followed Wilde's conversion to anarchist philosophy, following his reading of the works of Peter Kropotkin.

The Soul of Man under Socialism

The Soul of Man under Socialism. The chief advantage that would result from the establishment of Socialism is, undoubtedly, the fact that Socialism would relieve us from that sordid necessity of living for others which, in the present condition of things, presses so hardly upon almost everybody. In fact, scarcely anyone at all escapes

Oscar Fingal O’Flahertie Wills Wilde (1854-1900) was an Irish playwright, novelist, poet, and author of short stories. Known for his barbed wit, he was one of the most successful playwrights of late Victorian London, and one of the greatest celebrities of his day. Wilde made his reputation in the theatre world with a series of highly popular plays. Lady Windermere’s Fan (1893) like many of Wilde’s comedies is a biting satire on the morals of Victorian society, particularly marriage. A Woman of No Importance (1893) is a testimony of Wilde’s wit and his brand of dark comedy. An Ideal Husband (1895) revolves around blackmail and political corruption, and touches on the themes of public and private honour. The Importance of Being Earnest (1895) is one of his best loved plays, a comedy of manners. The Picture of Dorian Gray (1890) is his only published novel. Other works include: The Canterville Ghost (1887), The Happy Prince and Other Stories (1888), Lord Arthur Savile’s Crime and Other Stories (1891), A House of Pomegranates (1891), The Ballad of Reading Gaol (1898) and De Profundis (1905).
Akinohn
This is a well-told story of the forerunner of the Kardashians, a man who was famous for being famous long before it was an internet phenomenon.

Wilde's well-earned literary acclaim FOLLOWED his publicity venture to the US, and the book is replete with anecdotes about his meetings with the literati and glitterati of his day.

If you are a fan of Wilde, and who cannot love his wit, this book sets the stage for the life of one of the true geniuses of the late 19th century
Frey
I actually bought and read this book due to the review by Darragh O'Donoghue, who has written some of the best review's on this site, its so good, that rather that lamely try and express what I felt about this book, I am adding it here for you. Its long, but one review well worth reading:

It may seem willful to lead a selection of Oscar Wilde's major critical prose with an essay on left-wing politics, but 'The Soul of Man under Socialism' is more concerned with aesthetics than ethics: Wilde found socialism 'beautiful' because it encouraged freedom and individualism, freeing man to develop his emotional and imaginative lives. Wilde's Utopian scheme, as he admits, is gloriously impractical and contrary to human nature, but that's the point - it's because reforms are based on what is considered practical, rather than what might be possible or even unthinkable, that inequality and suffering persist. His vision of a future in which men dream and absorb Art as vaguely-imagined machines do all the menial work, reads like a delightful lampoon of HG Wells. Favorite Quotation: 'the moment that an artist takes notice of what other people want and tries to supply the demand, he ceases to be an artist and becomes a dull or amusing craftsman, an honest or dishonest tradesman').

The selection begins with examples of Wilde the professional reviewer at work, attending art lectures by Whistler, reading books by Pater and Swinburne, drawing attention to poetry anthologies by laboring socialists, praising an actress's memoirs. Some of the pieces are more theoretical, arguing, for instance, the importance and legacy of actors as critics of great theater. Each article presents difficult and often radical ideas in an accessible and witty manner. FQ: 'where there is no exaggeration there is no love, and where there is no love there is no understanding'.

'The Portrait of Mr. W.H.' (printed here in its extended 1889 revision) is quite simply one of the greatest achievements in the world literature of short fiction. 'Short story' doesn't begin to describe this work about a young scholar who commits suicide after being caught forging evidence to 'prove' a theory claiming that Shakespeare dedicated his Sonnets to a young actor-lover. 'Portrait' is mostly a dazzling exercise in critical play, but it is also a touching gay fantasy, a Nabokovian study of mad academics, a defense of 'forgery' as an aesthetic mode, a literary detective story, a history of the Elizabethan stage, an anthology of Elizabethan gossip, a Borgesian metaphysical puzzle and so much more. FQ: 'he always set an absurdly high value on personal appearance, and once read a paper before our Debating Society to prove that it was better to be good-looking than to be good'.

'In Defense of Dorian Gray' collects letters written by Wilde to hostile newspapers that branded his only novel immoral, decadent and demanded its interdiction. While it's depressing to see our hero stoop to these tedious non-entities, we must remember the dangerous influence of the reactionary press, and at least the letters make galvanizing reading, helping Wilde formulate ideas that would shape the novel's famous 'All art is quite useless' preface. FQ: 'Good people exasperate one's reason; bad people stir one's imagination'.

But the major achievement here is the four-part collection 'Intentions', a still explosive series of critical dialogues, memoirs and essays which are only 'safe' today because they are labeled 'classic' - if anyone actually absorbed these radical, liberating pieces, with their provocative, teasing, shifting, playful, ironic, contradictory, unsystematic, aphoristic, hilarious assertions on Art, Beauty, Life, Philosophy, Morality, Ethics, Crime etc., the whole world would implode, or at least irrevocably change. 'The Decay of Lying' demolishes the depressing modes of realism and naturalism and the tyranny of facts; 'Pen, Pencil and Poison' is a portrait of Wainewright the Prisoner, Wilde discussing his crimes with the same aesthetic detachment as he does his art and writing; ''The Critic as Artist' is his masterpiece, a credo and a gauntlet; 'The Truth of Masks' is an essay on the importance of costume and historical accuracy when staging Shakespeare, and seems to contradict everything else in the volume, with Wilde winningly admitting, 'Not that I agree with everything I have said in this essay'. FQ: 'The truth of metaphysics are the truth of masks'.

There are (at least) two Wildes in this volume; one whose address is utterly contemporary and congenial, intellectually curious, blasting all that is deadening, hypocritical and humbug, an alien in his own time. The other is startlingly Victorian, passionately engaged with elitist subjects that have little importance or (ugh) 'relevance' today (Classical literature, Aesthetics, the importance of form etc.), couching his theories in language that is often ornate, orotund, exotic, even verbose, a lush challenge to his fusty, pedantic peers.

Linda Dowling's introduction rescues Wilde from his earnest post-modern apologists and returns him fruitfully to his original context, the Oxford debates about 'Art for Art's sake' and the function of poetry and criticism,. Her copious notes are a blessing and necessity, as well as recreating a strange, wonderful, intellectually audacious cultural world, one that shames our depleted, dead-end, theory-strangulated, accept-anything age. I know you've heard this before, but this time it's true: BUY THIS BOOK AND LET IT CHANGE YOUR LIFE.

By Darragh O'Donoghue
Dusho
One need only read the Soul of Man to understand the genius of Wilde. An artist, a genius, and presents a worthy argument for socialism. I'm not at all a socialist, but I appreciate the motives that some socialists have, or that led them to that view. I was once one, and understand the perspective. However, knowing Wilde with the soul of the artist, one can clearly understand and embrace his reasons and why he thinks the way he does. He is very profound, and correct in many ways, proven right over time.

No matter what your political views, if you value intelligence in a world that finds it oppressive, read The Soul of Man, it will only do your own soul some good!

It did mine. Well recommended!

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