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» » Psychobabble: Exploding the Myths of the Self-Help Generation
Psychobabble: Exploding the Myths of the Self-Help Generation e-book

Author:

Stephen Briers

Language:

English

Category:

Other

Subcategory:

Social Sciences

ePub size:

1315 kb

Other formats:

doc rtf lrf docx

Rating:

4.3

Publisher:

Pearson Education; 1st edition (December 4, 2012)

Pages:

249

ISBN:

0273772392

Psychobabble: Exploding the Myths of the Self-Help Generation e-book

by Stephen Briers


Exposing the self-help myths that make us all more miserable. Please READ THIS BOOK if you found yourself lost in the ocean of self-help literature and just feel eviscerated and empty, confused and weary of trying to become a better person.

Exposing the self-help myths that make us all more miserable. This is literally a life saver.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Psychobabble: Exploding the myths of the self-help generation as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read.

Электронная книга "Psychobabble: Exploding the myths of the self-help generation", Stephen Briers

Электронная книга "Psychobabble: Exploding the myths of the self-help generation", Stephen Briers. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Psychobabble: Exploding the myths of the self-help generation" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Exposing the self-help myths that make us all more miserable Clinical psychologist, Dr Stephen Briers shines a light into the dark corners of self-help and explodes th. . This is what your psychologist would really tell you-if he thought you could handle it! This is the kick up the backside the self-help genre needs: an intelligent, provocative and thought-provoking expose of the modern myths that we're told make us happier, but in reality screw us up. Clinical psychologist, Dr Stephen Briers shines a light into the dark corners of self-help and explodes the myths, false hopes, quack philosophies and unrealistic expectations it routinely advocates.

Exposing the self-help myths that make us all more miserable One of the major selling points of any good self-help book is actually one of the most misleading, namely the promise that it will distil a potentially. One of the major selling points of any good self-help book is actually one of the most misleading, namely the promise that it will distil a potentially complex situation or life challenge into a manageable and readily digestible form. This would be great if it were remotely possible.

Get the key ideas from. Exploding the Myths of the Self-Help Generation. Who is it for? About the author. Read or listen to key insights from the world’s best nonfiction.

But does this psychobabble actually help? Stephen Briers dissects the worst clichés of the Me Generation. By Stephen Briers – Wednesday, 27th February 2013. 1. The root of all your problems is low self-esteem. Not only are happy people more gullible and slapdash about detail, but upbeat, happy moods can make us more prejudiced in our judgments and reactions.

Steven Briers in his highly-readble book Psychobabble: Exploding the Myths of the Self-Help Generation reveals things are not so simple. ven here in the Western world there is emerging evidence that letting it all out isn’t necessarily the best strategy for everyone.

Select Format: Paperback. ISBN13:9780273772392.

Exposing the self-help myths that make us all more miserable

Books : Psychobabble: Exploding the Myths of the Self-Help Generation (Paperback). Exposing the self-help myths that make us all more miserable. Clinical psychologist Dr Stephen Briers shines a light into the dark corners of self-help and explodes the myths false hopes quack philosophies and unrealistic expectations it routinely advocates.

Exposing the self-help myths that make us all more miserable. This is what your psychologist would really tell you–if he thought you could handle it!

This is the kick up the backside the self-help genre needs: an intelligent, provocative and thought-provoking expose of the modern myths that we’re told make us happier, but in reality screw us up.

Clinical psychologist, Dr Stephen Briers shines a light into the dark corners of self-help and explodes the myths, false hopes, quack philosophies and unrealistic expectations it routinely advocates. It is a refreshing antidote to the `same old same old’ approaches, offering a radical re-think of the way we approach problems in our lives, offering empowering new perspectives and expert advice on avoiding the biggest life traps. Dr Briers questions the perceived wisdom, shakes up the status quo, and encourages us to think again.


Madis
Please READ THIS BOOK if you found yourself lost in the ocean of self-help literature and just feel eviscerated and empty, confused and weary of trying to become a better person. This is literally a life saver. (quite long review but please read it if you want relief)

I've read tons of self-help books... just to mention a few: the classics (The Law of Success and Think and Grow Rich by Napoleon Hill, How to Win Friends and Influence People by Dale Carnegie), The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People by Stephen Covey, The Power of Now by Eckhart Tolle, Flow by Mihály Csíkszentmihályi, The Power of Your Subconcious Mind by Joseph Murphy, The Common Denominator of Succes by Alan Gray, The Science of Getting Rich by Wallace Wattles, As a Man Thinketh by James Allen, etc. I could go on. I stumbled upon some of the modern titles as well (Robert Kiyosaki, M. J. DeMarco, Rhonda Byrne...). I could go on. I've read books on the subject of mindfulness, personal finance, self-management, happiness in general, the psychology of love, men and women, relationships, charisma - you name it. My thoughts revolved around these matters in the past 1-1,5 years, 24/7.

At the beginning I truly felt my life was going to make a 180 degree turn. I was enthusiastic. The prospects seemed limitless as I devoured more and more books. I did my best to implement the new ideas and methods I learned. I tried to live by the ”laws of success”, I tried to ”be proactive”. At first, it really felt I was going in the right direction. I would talk to my friends about all the new things I learned, trying to convince them to apply them on their lifes. Ultimately, however, I always fell short in my own life. Something never seemed to work out as it should have. Something always was off. Something always felt forced and just basically alien to my life and to the person who I am. At first I thougt I needed to read MORE books. MORE ideas, MORE perspectives, MORE methods. Finally, I noticed that the more books I read, the more unhappy I became in my life.

I felt this nagging pain in my guts and knew something went astray. Finally the sudden ralization struck me when I was reading one of David Deida’s books, the Blue Truth: A Spiritual Guide to Life & Death and Love & Sex. Let me qoute it as it captures the situation perfectly:

„So you grow to the next stage. You dedicate yourself to self-improvement. You can use many methods to transform your negative emotions into positive ones. […] Eventually, however, if you continue to grow, your desire to transform negative emotions into positive ones begins to feel false. Your need to feel good about yourself begins to be a burden. Your need to feel successful, lovable, and unique begins to feel unnecessary, like a scab ready to fall off. Just as you were once motivated to feel good rather than bad, now you are naturally ready to open without any self-image—positive or negative—to protect you from what is. […] As you grow spiritually, your approach to negative emotions naturally matures. First, you flounder in negativity, alternating between denial and shame. Then, you embark on a well-intentioned effort to transform negative emotions into positive ones, improving yourself so that you become a more successful and lovable person in the mirror of your self-worth. Finally, you can’t help but live true to what is, whatever is. You stop trying to buoy yourself with motivation and positive thinking.”
Deida, David. Blue Truth (pp. 71-73). Sounds True. Kindle Edition.

THIS BOOK I am writing my review about came as a true life-saver. It draws attention to the fact that these self-help books (yes, EVEN the hundred-year-old classics) may be no less harmful than helpful if one is not available to read and apply them carefully, critically, with the proverbial grain of salt. It reveals that the methods suggested in most self-help books are often unworkable at best (in a mortal man's life), or, in the worst case even harmful and dangerous to our lifes, leading to utter unhappiness.

Now, I am not suggesting that the self-help literature is useless as it is or that I regret having read the books I mentioned before (not all of them at least). I am just saying that THIS BOOK opened my eye, took a huge burden off my shoulders and allowed me to return to my REAL SELF. I will never allow again any book to take away my common sense and my own faith in my abilities. I will not let any book to shake my faith in my own self ever again. I will not let any book to make me behave like a clown ever again. I hope more people who are in a similar situation than I was will read this book. Thank you Stephen Briers.
MisterMax
This was quite an interesting and fun book to read. Briers did a great job in bringing humour and fun into the problems with modern psychology. I don't agree with everything he wrote, but I loved much if not most of this book. I highly recommend this book.
blac wolf
It's about time someone took on self-help. The author presents compelling arguments against the most popular self help bulls*** out there.
Qwert
Interesting view on modern psychology with very funny inserts
Funky
I am so glad Dr. Briers took the effort and time to publish this book . Certainly in this day and age one comes across a lot of deceiving material that as Dr.Briers mentions overpromise but under deliver whilst at the same time pathologise aspects of normal
human behavior or of daily living where one retreats even more confused and with a zilched self esteem as one hasnt been doing what ought to be done rather than what is done . I personally have had the experience of undergoing "therapy" with a person who was keen on psychobabble and new age balderdash/codswallop , the person wasnt qualified in psychology but loved endorsing the secret/NLP/Reiki/ the sedona method which are all pseudoscientific , untested and not backed my psychological research , that so called shady "healer" repeated these aphorisms that to me made no sense but i believed them all considering the low point i was at my life , aphorisms for justifiying bad behavior and narcissistic tendencies and that all you need in life is self-love . I personally would love to see those crooks in solitary confinement for quite sometime and let me see how self-serving that self love is . Humans are social creatures , its lovely to have healthy relationships and friendships . Im glad Dr.Briers wrote this book to debunk all these myths and useless balderdash that make us more miserable than better :)
Togor
Great book
Weernis
one of my fav books of 2013. get away from the self-help monster on the internet and in society.

Highly recommend.
This book is an excellent antidote to the psychobabble dominating popular psychology and the self-help literature. The book is organized in 23 chapters, each taking on a popular psychology myth, from "The root of all your problems is low self-esteem" to "we must all strive to be happy" (look inside to review the table of contents and introduction). I found the chapters well researched, easy to read, often entertaining, insightful and thought-provoking. The author does a good job exposing how popular psychology and the self-help literature reinforce self-centered and narcissistic cultural stereotypes: everything seems to revolve around me, myself and I. Standard psychological advice nowadays is to increase self-esteem, be assertive, think positive, believe in one's own powers, disregard failure, and love one-self above everything else (see also The Narcissism Epidemic: Living in the Age of Entitlement, by Twenge and Campbell). Against these myths, the author points out that we are not in general "in control of our lives", we are not "masters of the universe", we are not immune to failure, we do not have unlimited power reserves, and positive thinking doesn't achieve one's goals all by itself - it does take hard work, talent, and discipline, and even then, failure is part of life and actually an important corrective that should be taken seriously. The author counters these myths of self-centeredness, invincibility, and entitlement with a healthy dose of humility, realism, and concern for others.

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