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» » Violence and the Sacred (Impacts)
Violence and the Sacred (Impacts) e-book

Author:

René Girard

Language:

English

Category:

Other

Subcategory:

Humanities

ePub size:

1468 kb

Other formats:

doc azw txt lrf

Rating:

4.1

Publisher:

Bloomsbury Academic (April 13, 2005)

Pages:

362

ISBN:

0826477186

Violence and the Sacred (Impacts) e-book

by René Girard


Violence and the Sacred book. His fascinating and ambitious book provides a fully developed theory of violence as the 'heart and secret soul' of the sacred.

Violence and the Sacred book.

Scott Appleby's book provides a timely, clear, and highly perceptive treatment of why and how religion has, especially . Ambivalence of the Sacred contains rich veins of information about the complex relationship of religion, violence and peacemaking.

Scott Appleby's book provides a timely, clear, and highly perceptive treatment of why and how religion has, especially since the end of the Cold War, gravitated to the center of the discussion of international affairs. There is no doubt that this volume will be the centerpiece henceforward of an important new discussion on ‘religion, violence, and reconciliation. David Little, United States Institute of Peace). It provides dozens of detailed portraits of personalities and religious movements that put faces on anonymous groups.

Violence and the Sacred (French: La violence et le sacré) is a 1972 book about the sacred by the French critic René Girard. However, the book has also been seen as "atheistic" or hostile to religion

Violence and the sacred. Violence and the sacred. by. Girard, René, 1923-.

Violence and the sacred. Rites and ceremonies, Sacrifice. Baltimore : Johns Hopkins University Press. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Oliver Wendell Holmes Library. Uploaded by station04. cebu on September 23, 2019.

For, in his 1972 book Violence and the Sacred,1 Girard defends an intimate connection between the sacred .

For, in his 1972 book Violence and the Sacred,1 Girard defends an intimate connection between the sacred and violence and he even identities both. 1. Girard’s Fundamental Anthropological Insight: The Triangular Character of Desire To understand Girard’s identification of violence and the sacred, we need to tackle the issue of what (human) violence is and where it comes from. To do this, we should fall back on Girard’s fundamental anthropological insight, namely the triangular character of human desire. 2 This triangular character 1 René Girard, La violence et le sacré (Paris: Grasset, 1972).

Violence and the Sacred (French: La violence et le sacré) is a 1972 book by the French anthropologist René Girard. Violence and the Sacred was written while Girard was distinguished professor at the State University of New York at Buffalo. YouTube Encyclopedic. Violence and the Sacred was written while Girard was distinguished professor at the State University of New York at Buffalo Summary. Girard discusses the ritual role of sacrifice.

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Violence and the Sacred is René Girard's landmark study of human evil. Here Girard explores violence as it is represented and occurs throughout history, literature and myth. Girard's forceful and thought-provoking analyses of Biblical narrative, Greek tragedy and the lynchings and pogroms propagated by contemporary states illustrate his central argument that violence belongs to everyone and is at the heart of the sacred.

1923-2015): literary critic turned philosophical anthropologist. Deceit, Desire, and the Novel: Self and Other in Literary Structure (1961) Violence and the Sacred (1972) Things Hidden since the Foundation of the World (1978) The Scapegoat (1982). Develops theories from reading authors and in dialogue with Levi-Strauss. all myths must have their roots in real acts of violence against real victims. Girard, The Scapegoat: Myths represent real violence against real victims. the persecutors believe in the guilt of their victim; they are imprisoned in the illusion of persecution that is no simple idea but a full system of representation. Girard, The Scapegoat.

René Girard (1923-) was Professor of French Language, Literature and Civilization at Stanford Unviersity from 1981 until his retirement in 1995.

Violence and the Sacred is Girard's brilliant study of human evil. Girard explores violence as it is represented and occurs throughout history, literature and myth. Girard's forceful and thought-provoking analyses of Biblical narrative, Greek tragedy and the lynchings and pogroms propagated by contemporary states illustrate his central argument that violence belongs to everyone and is at the heart of the sacred.

Translated by Patrick Gregory


Xor
Unless you are a sociologist or philosopher, you probably don’t want to read this book. Relying heavily on cultic myths and practices of various religions, Girard attempts to explain why violence is at the center of all societies and religions, and why, in fact, violence gave birth to religion.

He ultimately argues that there was an original act of violence which ultimately led to the possibility of the destruction of all people in the community, and so to avoid the ever-increasing cycles of violence, the community selected a ritual victim (a human or an animal) that would both carry the guilt of the community as well as the violent tendencies into death, thus satisfying the demands for revenge and the blood lust that comes with it.

He argues that much (all?) of our violence comes from a desire to imitate or have what belongs to another, and this desire leads to a violent action by which we seek to obtain the belongings or knowledge of the other being.

There is much more that Girard argues, but I do not recommend it for the average reader. His method of argumentation is laborious and while a discerning reader will benefit much from what Girard writes, the amount of work it takes to find these insights makes this book hardly worth the effort. Though I have not read them yet, I expect that “Things Hidden from the Foundation of the World” and “The Scapegoat” will prove to be more reader-friendly.
BORZOTA
Really great book. Seminal work by an important thinker. Will probably write more about it later, after I've read more by Girard.
Tyler Is Not Here
like the out of box thinking
Laitchai
as expected :-D
Written in the best french tradition - nothing is left out bud just written precisely as it should be
Uaha
Mimesis well discussed.
Phobism
Girard’s theological-anthropology of sacrice and its ritualization is a brilliant, though at bottom, metaphysical account of the origins of sacral relations. Through original analyses of myth and so-called archaic societies, Girard argues that practices of sacrifice (in relation to mimetic desire), are intended to control immanent violence within communities, thereby restoring the non-violence of social distinctions. While I found his reading of Freud reductive, there is much to be worked with in this multivalent account.
Goltizuru
Violence and religion have gone hand in hand as far back as we have records, from Dionysian revels and ancient human sacrifice to contemporary fundamentalisms that would destroy entire nations or races to preserve some particular version of Truth. In "Violence and the Sacred," Rene Girard attempts nothing less than to expose the entire history of this alliance.

It is impossible to give an adequate summary of this comprehensive and closely reasoned book. But briefly, Girard argues that - pre-historically - it was precisely acts of communal violence and the resulting shock and collective repression that resulted from these acts that generated our very sense of the sacred. And our continuing violence, in all its forms, is a history of attempts to re-experience transcendence.

(A word of caution: Early on, those with religious convictions may be tempted to conclude that Girard is reducing religion to a form of collective guilt. **He is not.** Girard is a Christian, and has progressed from literary criticism to critical theory to active efforts to promote methods of constructive, peaceful conflict resolution.)

In fleshing out this theory, Girard leans heavily on his insights into the mimetic and violent nature of desire (see his earlier "Deceit, Desire, and the Novel"), and he links mimetic desire, our tendency to marginalize and scapegoat those who are "different," our tendency toward violence, and our experience of ultimate otherness (the sacred). One of the most impressive aspects of this book is that it constitutes, simultaneously, a response not only to the questions of the origins of violence and religion, but to the key 19th century theorists Marx , Freud (the primal horde scenario, and repression), and Nietzsche, **and** to their late-20th century heirs - Foucault, Lacan, and Derrida (differance).

In the end, however, it was not simply Girard's argument that convinced me, impeccable as it seems. Rather, after working through this book, I began to see the mechanisms of mimetic violence in operation all around me - and within me, as well: consumerism driven by manufactured "needs," road rage, sibling rivalry, not to mention shamefully misdirected nationalism.

In my opinion, this is a very important book. By exposing the mimetic nature of violence and its subtle, often hidden workings, Girard - like a good therapist - gives us a tool to identify and begin to change deeply entrenched patterns of response, in ourselves and the world. But this is not a self-help book. It's a mature work of social and critical theory, and is definitely not light reading. If you take on "Violence and the Sacred," stick with it. It will change the way you see the world!

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