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» » Law and Colonial Cultures: Legal Regimes in World History, 1400-1900 (Studies in Comparative World History)
Law and Colonial Cultures: Legal Regimes in World History, 1400-1900 (Studies in Comparative World History) e-book

Author:

Lauren Benton

Language:

English

Category:

Other

Subcategory:

Humanities

ePub size:

1758 kb

Other formats:

txt lrf docx mobi

Rating:

4.9

Publisher:

Cambridge University Press (December 3, 2001)

Pages:

300

ISBN:

0521804140

Law and Colonial Cultures: Legal Regimes in World History, 1400-1900 (Studies in Comparative World History) e-book

by Lauren Benton


Lauren Benton has written an original and fascinating book.

Lauren Benton has written an original and fascinating book. a major contribution to the fields of history and la. Canadian Journal of Law and Society.

That Benton's book raises such questions only confirms its significance. Among people of different cultures, it would seem, we should not expect the rule of law to operate with the same impartiality and efficiency that allegedly obtains for members of the same nation. Benton is to be congratulated for these insights, and for bringing such far-flung, complex subjects together into a compelling whole. Naturally, in so doing, she reaches conclusions with which not everyone will be comfortable, but that is what good history does.

The book is cast within the fields of world history and imperialism rather than.

Law and Colonial Cultures: Legal Regimes and World History, 1400-1. 900. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2002, 285 pages. In Law and Colonial Cultures, Lauren Benton wages res-. pectful scholarly war on this paradigm. She claims that the colonial state did not. presuppose the rule of law, but the process worked in reverse. Fissures in a plural. The book is cast within the fields of world history and imperialism rather than. It enters intricate debates concerning hegemony, power, and the colo-. nial state, rather than the evolution of law, legal borrowing, the substantive law of.

Law and Colonial Cultures, a comparative legal history that focuses on five centuries. captivity and redemption in the Atlantic world, the legal status of indigenous peo-

Law and Colonial Cultures, a comparative legal history that focuses on five centuries. nial rule in the Americas, Asia, and Africa-should become an influential book. This challenging study touches on a broad range of topics, including the relation-. captivity and redemption in the Atlantic world, the legal status of indigenous peo-.

Law and Colonial Cultures book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Law and Colonial Cultures: Legal Regimes in World History, 1400-1900 as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Home Browse Books Book details, Law and Colonial Cultures: Legal Regimes i. .Law and Colonial Cultures: Legal Regimes in World History, 1400-1900.

Studies in Comparative World History.

She describes how the colonial state developed through jurisdictional conflicts between native judicial systems and colonial legal systems. These conflicts led colonial states to assume increased control of important economic transactions.

Similar books and articles. Historical Perspectives on Legal Pluralism. American Curiosity: Cultures of Natural History in the Colonial British Atlantic World

Similar books and articles. Lauren Benton - 2012 - In Brian Z. Tamanaha, Caroline Mary Sage & Michael J. V. Woolcock (ed., Legal Pluralism and Development: Scholars and Practitioners in Dialogue. American Curiosity: Cultures of Natural History in the Colonial British Atlantic World. William Leach - 2006 - Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 97:752-753. A Source Book In Geology, 1400–1900. Gordon Davies - 1971 - British Journal for the History of Science 5 (4):407-408.

This book advances a new perspective in world history, arguing that institutions and culture--and not just the global economy--serve as important elements of international order. Focusing on colonial legal politics and the interrelation of local cultural contests and institutional change, it uses case studies to trace a shift in plural legal orders--from the multicentric law of early empires to the state-centered law of the colonial and postcolonial world. Benton shows how Indigenous subjects across time were active in making, changing, and interpreting the law--and, by extension, in shaping the international order.
NiceOne
World histories are extremely difficult to do because it requires the historian to make broad, sweeping assertions about many different cultures concerning which the historian can never be an expert in each. As a specialist in Islam, I for one was sometimes left deeply dissatisfied by some of the sections focusing on Islam. This, in turn, made me question the nature of the analyses on areas concerning which I have no indepth knowledge such as in Spanish and Portugese empires.
This being said, however, the general outline presented in the book as a tendency of colonial cultures with regard to legal institutions (from multi-centric and informal to strictly state-centered and enforced with centralized compulsion) is widely corroborated and extremely helpful in grasping the evolution and centrality of legal institutions in the formation of these colonialial and, subsequently, post-colonial cutlures. The argument, therefore, makes great strides in supplementing merely economic historical accounts, such as dependency theory a la Wallerstein, with studies of colonial institutions as such and not as a mere apparatus of economic ideologies.
Joony
I found this book to be extraordinary -- it changed my thinking about jurisdictional conflicts in colonial societies. Benton has adroitly analyzed the impact of jurisdictional tensions on global legal regimes. A must-read for legal historians and others in the field.
Wishamac
This is a good read for an alternative understanding of World History's historiography. Not an easy read as a legal history, but interesting.

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