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» » Central Asia in World History (New Oxford World History)
Central Asia in World History (New Oxford World History) e-book

Author:

Peter B. Golden

Language:

English

Category:

Other

Subcategory:

Humanities

ePub size:

1272 kb

Other formats:

mobi rtf lrf doc

Rating:

4.9

Publisher:

Oxford University Press; 1 edition (February 2, 2011)

Pages:

192

ISBN:

0195159470

Central Asia in World History (New Oxford World History) e-book

by Peter B. Golden


Central Asia in World Hi. .has been added to your Cart. Students of Central Asian history and their teachers owe a great debt of gratitude to Peter Golden for writing this book. -Journal of the Economic and Social History of the Orient.

Central Asia in World Hi. Peter B. Golden is Professor Emeritus of History and Director of the Middle Eastern Studies Program, Rutgers University. Series: New Oxford World History. Paperback: 192 pages.

Oxford University Press, In. publishes works that further. The rise of the new world history as a discipline comes at an opportune time. The interest in world history in schools and among the general public is vast. Oxford University’s objective of excellence. Auckland Cape Town Dar es Salaam Hong Kong Karachi. We travel to one another’s nations, converse and work with people around the world, and are changed by global events. War and peace affect populations worldwide as do economic conditions and the state of our environment, communications, and health and medicine.

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Библиографические данные. Central Asia in World History New Oxford World History. Oxford University Press, 2011. 0199793174, 9780199793174. BiBTeX EndNote RefMan.

Start by marking Central Asia in World History as Want to Read . This book is much more about the actual history of Central Asia and focuses less on the big picture and more on Central Asia in context

Start by marking Central Asia in World History as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. This book is much more about the actual history of Central Asia and focuses less on the big picture and more on Central Asia in context. Bottom Line: Short (but not necessarily a quick read) Academic Full of information Not gripping or particularly well written Not great for tying lots of ideas and histories together.

Series: New Oxford world history.

This work traces the history of the nomadic steppe tribes and sedentary inhabitants of the oasis city-states of Central Asia from pre-history to the present. Particular focus is placed on the unique melting pot cultures that this region has produced over millennia"-Provided by publisher. Abstract: This compact book traces the history of the nomadic steppe tribes and sedentary inhabitants of the oasis city-states of Central Asia from pre-history to the present.

Download books for free. This work traces the history of the nomadic steppe tribes and sedentary inhabitants of the oasis city-states of Central Asia from pre-history to the present. File: EPUB, . 6 MB. Save for later.

This book is part of the New Oxford World History, an innovative series that offers readers an informed, lively, and up-to-date history of the world and its people that represents a significant change from the old world history. Only a few years ago, world history generally amounted to a history of the West-Europe and the United States-with small amounts of information from the rest of the world. Some versions of the old world history drew attention to every part of the world except Europe and the United States.

Series Title: New Oxford World History. Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA. Book theme: Central Asia. Author: Peter B Golden. Street Date: February 2, 2011. Item Number (DPCI): 247-34-8790. If the item details above aren’t accurate or complete, we want to know about it.

Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2011. 25 b/w illustrations. Hardback £4. 0, -9; paperback £1. 9, -5. Volume 7 Issue 2 - Jagjeet Lally. Cambridge, The Cambridge World History of Slavery.

A vast region stretching roughly from the Volga River to Manchuria and the northern Chinese borderlands, Central Asia has been called the "pivot of history," a land where nomadic invaders and Silk Road traders changed the destinies of states that ringed its borders, including pre-modern Europe, the Middle East, and China. In Central Asia in World History, Peter B. Golden provides an engaging account of this important region, ranging from prehistory to the present, focusing largely on the unique melting pot of cultures that this region has produced over millennia. Golden describes the traders who braved the heat and cold along caravan routes to link East Asia and Europe; the Mongol Empire of Chinggis Khan and his successors, the largest contiguous land empire in history; the invention of gunpowder, which allowed the great sedentary empires to overcome the horse-based nomads; the power struggles of Russia and China, and later Russia and Britain, for control of the area. Finally, he discusses the region today, a key area that neighbors such geopolitical hot spots as Iran, Afghanistan, Pakistan, and China.
Fearlesssinger
A broad overview of Central Asian history that skimps on certain themes and cultures,many rushes through the modern age. The author also has an interesting pro-China bent, which leads him to present historical alliances in a way that isn't always entirely accurate. More maps and perhaps a tree of how all the different Central Asian people's are related would have been much appreciated.
Overall - good for a glance at regional history, but shouldn't be used a definitive guide.
Lahorns Gods
Central Asia is often overlooked in history - or told from the view point of outsiders and enemies. This book helps to remedy that problem by focusing on Central Asian history from the inside. The book is very short and easy to read through (139 pages of text). Some of the chronological historical chapters can be a bit dense (due to the huge amount of information packed therein). None of the subjects are treated in depth because the point of the book is to be an overview. If readers would like more depth, the book includes sufficient detail to know what to look for in monographs or more specific books (including names of leaders, tribes, cities, regions, and dates) but for readers unfamiliar with the region or wanting to read a solid introduction, this is the book. Central Asia in World History is a great entry into the history of central Asia and hopefully will inspire many people to learn more about this important region.
Hap
This history is broad and enlightening while being short enough for a quick read. True to its introduction, it does indeed describe the role of this large, but poorly understood region, in the development of world trade (e.g., the Silk Road), military technology (e.g., the composite bow) and modern nations (e.g., Turkey and the Stans). The history is authoritative naming leaders, tribes and cities with extensive notes for further study. Nevertheless, given the strangeness of the names and remoteness of the places cited, the book could be improved significantly with one or more maps per chapter to chart the ebb and flow of the competing peoples.
Minha
TMI and tedious. In fairness this book offers lots of history wound around countless names, places and events. But, you'll want to have maps, the index, a glossary, etc. close at hand for each page.
Zehaffy
Our future is in Asia for trade.Europe is in decline.
Manazar
A superb short introduction to the Central Asia and the history of the Silk Routes.
black coffe
Brilliant work.
I've read a few other concise history books, and used to read History Magazine and Military History Magazine. I can say without a doubt that this is the poorest written thing that I've ever read. I cannot begin to count the number of run-on sentences, where side bar information, that could have been in another sentence, is part of a really long sentence, that the author wrote.
I hate to say that what I've read on Wikipedia on Central Asia was better written. It's not that the author isn't presenting sufficient facts. It's simply the aesthetics of the presentation.
By the way, "Peter B. Golden" is an awesome name.

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