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» » Nicopolis 1396: The Last Crusade (Praeger Illustrated Military History)
Nicopolis 1396: The Last Crusade (Praeger Illustrated Military History) e-book

Author:

David Nicolle

Language:

English

Category:

Other

Subcategory:

Humanities

ePub size:

1580 kb

Other formats:

lit mbr lrf doc

Rating:

4.8

Publisher:

Praeger (September 14, 2005)

Pages:

96

ISBN:

0275988422

Nicopolis 1396: The Last Crusade (Praeger Illustrated Military History) e-book

by David Nicolle


Book Condition: Like new. Hardcover. Praeger Illustrated Military History Series. Ships on same or next business day in secure packaging with tracking/delivery confirmation.

Book Condition: Like new.

Download books for free. Nicopolis 1396 Книги Исторические Автор: . icolle Формат: pdf Издат. Download (pdf, 3. 6 Mb) Donate Read.

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Osprey's Campaign title for the Crusade battle at Nicopolis (1396)  . Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read.

Nicopolis 1396 Osprey Campaign №64. Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read

Nicopolis 1396 Osprey Campaign №64. Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them.

This book clearly laid out the last part of the Crusades fought with sticks-and-swords. Nothing fancy about this book - just another very solid history lesson from D. icolle.

book by David Nicolle. This book clearly laid out the last part of the Crusades fought with sticks-and-swords. The place was far remove from Jerusalem, but the competing powers each rested on a long heritage of crusading history.

Campaign 64. Author: David Nicolle. David Nicolle was born in 1944, the son of the illustrator Pat Nicolle. He worked in the BBC Arabic service for a number of years, before gaining an MA from the School of Oriental and African Studies, London, and a doctorate from Edinburgh University. He later taught world and Islamic art and architectural history at Yarmuk University, Jordan. He has written many books and articles on medieval and Islamic warfare, and has been a prolific author of Osprey titles for many years.

Nicolle, David (1999). Nicopolis 1396: The Last Crusade. London: Osprey Publishing. php?title 1396&oldid 932816047".

The Last Crusade - D. Nicolle Download Now. saveSave Nicopolis 1396 Thermae Et Balnea - The Architecture and Cultural History of Roman Public Baths. Uploaded by. Kenneth Davis. Nicolle. pdf - Free download as PDF File . df) or read online for free. Download Now. saveSave Nicopolis 1396. The Last Crusade - D. Thermae Et Balnea - The Architecture and Cultural History of Roman Public Baths.

Поиск книг BookFi BookSee - Download books for free. nicopolis 1396 the last crusade. David Nicolle, Christa Hook. Категория: history military. Категория: Исторические. David Nicolle, Graham Turner. 1. 2 Mb. Medieval Russian Armies 1250 - 1500. David Nicolle, Angus McBride.

By the second half of the 14th century, the once mighty Byzantine Empire had been reduced to little more than the city of Constantinople. In 1391, the Ottoman ruler Sultan Bayazid I 'The Lightning' besieged the city. Pope Boniface IX preached a crusade and a French-led army of 10,000 marched east. At Nicopolis they met the Ottoman army in battle. Ignoring the advice of their Hungarian and Transylvanian allies the Crusaders charged the Turks and were in turn smashed by the Ottoman heavy cavalry. The last Crusade ended on the banks of the Danube as the Crusaders desperately sought to escape from the pursuing Turks.

The background to the Nicopolis Crusade can be found in the rapid spread of Ottoman Turkish conquests, particularly in the southern Balkans, during the second half of the 14th century. More specifically, it was the Ottoman threat to Hungary following the failure of a Hungarian uprising against Ottoman domination in Bulgaria that provoked action from its politically fragmented territories and the worried powers beyond. By this time, the once mighty Byzantine Empire had been reduced to little more than the city of Constantinople itself. In 1391 the Sultan Bayazid I 'The Lightning' besieged the city. Pope Boniface IX preached a crusade and a French-led army of 10,000 marched east. At Nicopolis on the Danube they met the Ottoman army in battle. Ignoring the advice of their Hungarian and Transylvanian allies the Crusaders charged the Turks and were in turn smashed by the Ottoman heavy cavalry. The last Crusade ended on the banks of the Danube as the Crusaders desperately sought to escape from the pursuing Turks. David Nicolle discusses this climax to the last great French-led crusade. Researched entirely from primary sources, much of the material in the book has never been published before.


Āłł_Ÿøūrš
"If God dropped the sky on our heads, we would maintain it with the tops of our lances!" declaration of the French knights at the crusade's military council.

I will not go into great detail as to the accepted excellence of Dr. David Nicolle's work, or that of the near god-like credibility of David G. Chandler, THE leading authority on Medieval Warfare in our lifetime. That has been covered by far more intelligent people than myself, and in truth, what are we reviewing; the authors or their material? What I will discuss is the book itself.

Osprey Military Books has been putting out an amazing, reliable, and entertaining line of material for more years than I can remember. The books are well-researched and written, with wonderful coloured templates, original etchings, and pictures of relics and historical sites and places of import.

NICOPOLIS 1396 is one of the CAMPAIGN Series in the Osprey collection, and it is in a word - Amazing! There are 96 pages covering everything from: The Origins of the Campaign, The Opposing Commanders & their forces, their battle plans, and then coverage of the Campaign itself. It goes on to discuss the Aftermath and Reckoning of the battle, as well as what the battlefield looks like today. It provides information for 'Further Reading', and for the die-hards out there, it also furnishes how to Play Nicopolis as a War-Game.

The text is well written and easy and enjoyable to follow. The book is ripe with illustrations, both ancient and contemporary, as well as maps, a three dimensional diagram of the battlefield, and illustrations all throughout.

This book is perfect for both the experienced and well-versed, and the interested first timer approaching the subject. NICOPOLIS 1396: THE LAST CRUSADE is just one more superior piece of military literature that Osprey can claim as their own - and should - with pride.
Siralune
great
Winasana
Nothing fancy about this book - just another very solid history lesson from Dr.Nicolle.
Bandiri
The first place any review of this short book would need to start out at is the author himself, David Nicolle. Dr. Nicolle is one of the world's leading scholars of medieval warfare, both Western and Islamic. He has published dozens of books on the subject. He is an impeccable authority on the topic and this book shows it.
The book follows the typical Osprey format for the "campaign" series, starting off with a brief introduction to the two sides in every respect (i.e., leaders, armies, tactics, strengths and weaknesses, experience levels, etc.). The book then goes on to elaborate on the geopolitical situation of each side, basically that the Christians were very much mistrustful and resentful of each other and not very united in terms of command structure while the Ottoman state was very hierarchical and unified. This was a major factor contributing to the Ottoman victory.

Nicolle then follows the routes of the two armies before they even met, the battle itself and the immediate consequences. He elaborates, quite well, on the poor tactics used by the crusading armies relative to the tactical flexibility of the Ottoman forces, another major contributing factor to the Christian defeat. He also elaborates on the arrogance of the French forces, along with their lack of experience against Islamic military tactics, both in absolute terms and relative to their Wallachian allies who were much more suited to battle the Ottomans because of their greater tactical flexibility and considerable experience fighting the Ottomans in the past. It was this French arrogance in ignoring the advice of their Wallachian allies that also contributed, in a major fashion, to the Christian defeat. Nicolle not only covers these major themes well but also covers a number of minor events quite well. For example, he provides numerous competing views as to what happened to many of the Christians captured during the battle.

Nicolle concludes the book with the immediate consequences of the battle, basically that the Christian alliance was shattered, the Christian states bordering the Ottoman state were seriously weakened and the Ottoman state consolidated its hold in the Balkans. All this eventually enabled the Ottomans to launch a long term successful war of conquest of the Balkans.

For the book's short length, 96 pages about half of which are illustration, the book does an excellent job at providing a succinct history of the battle for those with only an hour or two to spend on the subject.
Berkohi
This book clearly laid out the last part of the Crusades fought with sticks-and-swords. The place was far remove from Jerusalem, but the competing powers each rested on a long heritage of crusading history.
The argument relied on the traditional assumption that the Austrians had over calculated their Balkan allies' fighting will. Their pompous mounted knights waited for and listed to no one. This very attitude cost them the whole campaign, although started successfully, when they reached the outskirts of Nicopolis (Bulgaria).
For once, history mentioned some goodness for the 'Serbs' when they finished off the last remaining Austrian's knights for the Ottomans. Only the wide river of Danube saved the Christian Coalition Army from total destruction.
You won't find any fancy strategy devised by the Ottoman on this battle, but everything seemed went wrong for the Christian army. Several colored pictures nicely decorate this piece of work.
Another fine effort pulled by the team at Osprey Publishing, it's where you relied on when speaking about military history.
Morlurne
_Nicopolis 1396_ offers very solid analysis not only of the battle and the preceeding campaign but also of the late-medieval political and social climate that led to this crusade and the political aftermath of its defeat.

The historical background and battle order of the Hungarian and Wallachian allies read more dry than those of the Franco-Burgundians, but Nicolle presents a thorough narrative of the campaign and battle, always labeling his speculation as such and providing evidence to support it. His discussion fails to place the success of the Ottoman archers against the Franco-Burgundian knights within the tactical context of previous and subsequent archer-vs-knight clashes such as Crecy and Agincourt, but his focus on the political causes and results of this crusade is equally as interesting.

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