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» » Martial races: The military, race and masculinity in British imperial culture, 1857-1914 (Studies in Imperialism MUP)
Martial races: The military, race and masculinity in British imperial culture, 1857-1914 (Studies in Imperialism MUP) e-book

Author:

Heather Streets

Language:

English

Category:

Other

Subcategory:

Humanities

ePub size:

1732 kb

Other formats:

mbr lrf mobi azw

Rating:

4.6

Publisher:

Manchester University Press; 1 edition (November 1, 2010)

Pages:

256

ISBN:

0719069637

Martial races: The military, race and masculinity in British imperial culture, 1857-1914 (Studies in Imperialism MUP) e-book

by Heather Streets


Heather Streets is Assistant Professor of British and British Imperial History at Washington State University.

Heather Streets is Assistant Professor of British and British Imperial History at Washington State University. Series: Studies in Imperialism MUP.

Studies in Imperialism. Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2004.

Martial Races: The Military, Race and Masculinity in British Imperial Culture, 1857–1914. Studies in Imperialism. Martial Races: The Military, Race and Masculinity in British Imperial Culture, 1857–1914. Volume 46 Issue 4 - Jonathan Hyslop. Recommend this journal. Journal of British Studies.

An impressive contribution to the history of military thought and an original addition to imperial studies. -David Omissi, University of Hull

An impressive contribution to the history of military thought and an original addition to imperial studies. -David Omissi, University of Hull.

Martial race was a designation created by army officials of British India after the Indian Rebellion of 1857, where they classified each caste into one of two categories, 'martial' and 'non-martial'. The ostensible reason was that a 'martial race' was typically brave and well-built for fighting, while the 'non-martial races' were those whom the British believed to be unfit for battle because of their sedentary lifestyles.

Imperial Culture 1857-1914 (Studies in Imperialism) (Paperback) .

Martial Races: The Military Race and Masculinity in British Imperial Culture 1857-1914 (Studies in Imperialism) (Paperback). item 2 Martial Races: The Military Race and Masculinity in British New Paperback Book -Martial Races: The Military Race and Masculinity in British New Paperback Book. Product Identifiers.

oceedings{T, title {:Martial Races: the Military, Race and Masculinity in British Imperial Culture, 1857–1914}, author {Keith Terrance Surridge}, year {2007} }. Keith Terrance Surridge.

Martial races bridges regional studies of South Asia and Britain while straddling the fields of racial theory, masculinity, imperialism, identity politics, and military studies

Martial races bridges regional studies of South Asia and Britain while straddling the fields of racial theory, masculinity, imperialism, identity politics, and military studies. It challenges the marginalisation of the British Army in histories of Victorian popular culture, and demonstrates the army's enduring impact on the regional cultures of the Highlands, the Punjab and Nepal. This unique study will make fascinating reading for higher level students and experts in imperial history, military history and gender history.

This book explores how and why Scottish Highlanders, Punjabi Sikhs, and Nepalese Gurkhas became identified as the British Empire's fiercest, most manly soldiers in nineteenth century discourse. As 'martial races' these men were believed to possess a biological or cultural disposition to the racial and masculine qualities necessary for the arts of war. Because of this, they were used as icons to promote recruitment in British and Indian armies - a phenomenon with important social and political effects in India, in Britain, and in the armies of the Empire. Martial races bridges regional studies of South Asia and Britain while straddling the fields of racial theory, masculinity, imperialism, identity politics, and military studies. It challenges the marginalisation of the British Army in histories of Victorian popular culture, and demonstrates the army's enduring impact on the regional cultures of the Highlands, the Punjab and Nepal. This unique study will make fascinating reading for higher level students and experts in imperial history, military history and gender history.
Ballagar
needed the book for class.
Akirg
I really liked this book. The author was very thorough and handled the subject matter extremely well.
Mikale
Well written, well researched.

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