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» » The Fall of Saigon
The Fall of Saigon e-book

Author:

David Butler

Language:

English

Category:

No category

ePub size:

1880 kb

Other formats:

azw lit lrf docx

Rating:

4.1

Publisher:

Abacus (January 1, 1990)

Pages:

592

ISBN:

0349101450

The Fall of Saigon e-book

by David Butler


The author weaves a complete narrative by combining first hand American and Vietnamese views.

The author weaves a complete narrative by combining first hand American and Vietnamese views. Moreover, having been on the ground in Saigon during that last days of the American war in Vietnam Butler provides credible information. Butler's work is comprehensive and objective. He also manages to integrate many tid-bits of information to demonstrate the plight of the everyday pedestrian

The Fall of Saigon book. See a Problem? We’d love your help.

The Fall of Saigon book.

David Butler, a Fellow of Nuffield College, Oxford, since 1951, has been associated with the Nuffield Election Studies since 1945. Bibliographic information.

A noted journalist draws on his firsthand impressions and experiences to interweave the lives of thirty men and women, both American and Vietnamese, who became caught up in the climactic fall of Saigon in April 1975. An excellent book about the end of the Vietnam War. By Thriftbooks. com User, December 11, 2005. I've read several books about the fall of Vietnam in 1975 and the evacuation of the Americans and Vietnamese from the doomed country. Decent Interval" by Frank Snepp is excellent.

The event marked the end of the Vietnam War and the start of a transition period to the formal reunification of Vietnam into the Socialist Republic of Vietnam.

What David Butler's The Fall of Saigon conveys best of all is the sense of surprise, shock and panic among the Americans in South Vietnam as the Thieu regime collapsed around them. Many found it hard to believe "the party was over. The sudden and catastrophic transition of South Vietnam from an army with a country to a country without an army has been told before, and better, by Frank Snepp in A Decent Interval and Arnold R. Isaacs in Without Honor. Indeed, you could say Butler plays Walter Lord to Isaacs' Thucydides

1/ I am the author of Butler, David; The Fall of Saigon, Scenes from the Sudden End of a Long War; Simon & Schuster, 1985

1/ I am the author of Butler, David; The Fall of Saigon, Scenes from the Sudden End of a Long War; Simon & Schuster, 1985. Two additional points: 1. Frank Snepp, the CIA Analyst/Officer in Saigon (and his book) have been proven extensively to contain many factual errors and outright fabrications. Snepp had personal axes to grind with many at the Saigon Mission, and Snepp is known as a callous and self-involved promoter of all things Snepp.

Dartmouth College class of 1963 Author of The Fall of Saigon. Have short synopsis of Vietnam War gay novel. Info at ww. allsaigon.

Creased and tanned spine has chipped ends, page edges tanned. Shipped from the U.K. All orders received before 3pm sent that weekday.
Marg
A very interesting book. I fully enjoyed reading it
Cargahibe
Good reading Alot of info. we never heard in the news. If you want to know more about Viet Nam war this book is worth reading.
Gtonydne
on time and on target
Sorryyy
I've read several books about the fall of Vietnam in 1975 and the evacuation of the Americans and Vietnamese from the doomed country. "Decent Interval" by Frank Snepp is excellent. Snepp sees the events as an Embassy insider -- and one of his purposes is to excoriate the U.S. government -- and Ambassador Graham Martin -- for its failure to evacuate Vietnamese allies. Compared to "Decent Interval," "The Fall of Saigon" has a broader vision and the perspective is perhaps more balanced as it comes 10 years after the event, allowing time for reflection.

Butler begins the book with the attack of the North Vietnamese army in the Central Highlands on March 6, 1975. He ends it with the evacuation of the American Embassy in Saigon and the surrender of the South Vietnamese government on April 30. The evacuation of Saigon was one of the darkest -- but most dramatic -- events of American history. There are heroes aplenty here, especially young diplomats at the Embassy who took enormous chances to help Vietnamese friends and colleagues escape from the advancing communist army. One has to admire the inexperienced Marines who did so well in protecting the Embassy and Americans during those last days. Butler also gives attention to Vietnamese on both sides of the war although the book focuses mostly on the Americans.

Butler was a journalist in Saigon during those last days and the the great majority of the book is compiled from interviews the author had with the American and South and North Vietnamese participants and eye witnesses, including his own experiences. We are treated to some unique stories, for example, to the saga of a missionary couple cut off in the Central Highlands but most of the book is devoted to an account of the last days of of the U.S. government's presence in Saigon. This story is complex, involving many characters and shifting of scenes. Good maps and photos illustrate the story and Butler's writing is clear, concise, and compelling.

Smallchief
fr0mTheSkY
"The Fall of Saigon," by David Butler is a detailed account of a heartbreaking story. The author weaves a complete narrative by combining first hand American and Vietnamese views. Moreover, having been on the ground in Saigon during that last days of the American war in Vietnam Butler provides credible information.
Butler's work is comprehensive and objective. He also manages to integrate many tid-bits of information to demonstrate the plight of the everyday pedestrian. However, the key to the success of this book is the minute by minute, hour by hour countdown of how Americas pulled out of Vietnam. The text is enhanced by outstanding photos.
Anyone interested in examining the hasty withdrawal from Saigon should read this intimate book. Butler knows the cast of journalists and many of the key American embassy players. Consequently, he has managed to complete an amazingly credible manuscript of how the U.S. failed to keeps its promise to thousands of Vietnamese. Butler proves we were not able to keep our word when we said...that we would never leave without them.
Mpapa
Do not start this book unless you have plenty of reading time. The phrase "hard to put down" is an understatement. For most of us, we watched the events of April 29, 1975 unfold on our TV sets. Author David Butler not only watched, but was also a participant in the final hours of the American Presence in Vietnam. His eyewitness accounts are both gripping and detailed. He has also collected and researched numerous first-person accounts from those who were in Saigon during those last hours.
The North Vietnamese Army made thier final push at 4 AM and in the process cut off the only available airfield. The only means of escape from the siege would be a massive evacuation using helicopters. While reading these accounts, you can feel the tension and confusion along with countless other emotions of those involved. A Hollywood script could never compare to this real-life drama. The Vietnam War was a long road in American History. The Fall of Saigon was the last milestone.
Dianalmeena
This book documents the last few chaotic weeks of the US presents in Vietnam. The human story is effectively conveyed by first hand accounts of eyewitnesses from many strata of Vietnam society. The author, an NBC reporter in Saigon, witnessed these events firsthand. His unique perspective and access to the diplomatic corps adds a fascinating credibility to the book. His discussion concerning the actions and statements of Ambassador Graham Martin particularly intrigued me. Did Martin's decisions during that period contribute to the frantic last minute evacuation that left many friendlies stranded? The author makes no judgments. Butler includes transcript of many diplomatic cables to and from Martin and Secretary of State Kissinger and the White House concerning events and plans for evacuation and rescue. Reading these transcripts today still convevs a strong emotional impact for this reader. Interspacing these high level discussions are the stories of a whole society turned upside down while "we" skipped town.

The Fall of Saigon is not an easy book to read. We are forced to confront the final conclusion of our failed crusade. Our goal was the minds and the hearts but we ended up fragmented the lives of the people we were suppose to help. When one considers the sacrifices made by both countries in treasure and lives the facts concerning the events of April-May 1975 are hard to digest, even after 30 plus years. No judgments are made here, no accusing fingers are pointed; we must read, and ponder.

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