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» » Unity and Diversity in the New Testament: An Inquiry into the Character of Earliest Christianity
Unity and Diversity in the New Testament: An Inquiry into the Character of Earliest Christianity e-book

Author:

James D. G Dunn

Language:

English

Category:

No category

ePub size:

1510 kb

Other formats:

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Rating:

4.7

Publisher:

Westminster Press (1977)

Pages:

470

ISBN:

0664213421

Unity and Diversity in the New Testament: An Inquiry into the Character of Earliest Christianity e-book

by James D. G Dunn


Dunn's book examines early Christianity, and reveals a broad-a shockingly broad-range of beliefs and practices among early . This book is an excellent overview of the diversity of perspectives within the New Testament. It will challenge the fundamentalist and pull the reigns on the liberal.

Dunn's book examines early Christianity, and reveals a broad-a shockingly broad-range of beliefs and practices among early Christians, and he bases his examination on an analysis of the New Testament itself.

Dunn's big book on unity and diversity within the New Testament was, at least for conservative scholars and Christians, controversial upon its release.

Unity and Diversity has proved its value as a textbook over the years, but it is now well over ten years old and scholarship has not stood still in that period. To assist him in making the revisions now needed, Professor Dunn enlisted the help of his New Testament seminar, which subjected the whole book to a chapter-by-chapter critique.

Presents a compelling argument for the New Testament’s literacy and theological unity. Dunn (b. 1939) is emeritus Lightfoot Professor of Divinity at the University of Durham and is a leading British New Testament scholar

Presents a compelling argument for the New Testament’s literacy and theological unity. Examines key relationships between New Testament authors. Provides a defining study by a world-renowned New Testament scholar. 1939) is emeritus Lightfoot Professor of Divinity at the University of Durham and is a leading British New Testament scholar. Dunn is a significant proponent of the new perspective on Paul, and coined the term in a 1982 lecture. He received a PhD and DD from the University of Cambridge, and a MA and BD from the University of Glasgow.

Article in The Journal of Theological Studies 59(1):443-444 · February 2008 with 9 Reads. The Contrasting Perspectives of Unity and Diversity in the New Testament. The Role of the Feminine in Ministry in John and 1 Timothy web pub. Data. How we measure 'reads'. DOI: 1. 093/jts/flm025.

Unity and Diversity in the New Testament is a thorough investigation into the canon of the New Testament, and Christianity's origins. It assumes the reader is familiar with the basic question of who wrote the books, when, why etc and it moves on to look in detail at what were the various emphases in the gospel proclaimed by Jesus, Luke, Paul and John. The final chapter is the authors "critical refinement" of the ideas and issues that remain relevant and important for any realistic theology of canon to be considered today.

the New Testament: An Inquiry into the Character of Earliest Christianity London: SCM Dunn, James D. G. 1991

Unity and Diversity in the New Testament: An Inquiry into the Character of Earliest Christianity. London: SCM Dunn, James D. 1991. The Partings of the Ways: Between Christianity and Judaism and their Significance for the Character of Christianity. London: SCM Dunn, Marilyn. The Emergence of Monasticism: From the Desert Fathers to the Early Middle Ages. Malden, MA: Blackwell. 譯:《修道主義的興起》。 北京:中國社會 科學出版社, 2010 。

org to approved e-mail addresses.

org to approved e-mail addresses. You may be interested in. The Theology of Paul the Apostle (New Testament). Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Company.

Unity and Diversity in the New Testament is a thorough investigation into the canon of the New Testament, and Christianity's origins. It assumes the reader is familiar with the basic question of who wrote the books, when, why etc and it moves on to look in detail at what were the various emphases in the gospel proclaimed by Jesus, Luke, Paul and John. It also examines primitive Christianity's preaching and teaching, confessional formulae, oral traditions, organisation and worship, concepts of ministry and community, and ritual acts. In the second half of the book, the author maps out the scope of the diversity he found in the fist half's investigation. Here he identifies and traces the major currents within the stream of first and second generation Christianity which includes a study of Jewish Christianity, Hellenistic Christianity, Apocalyptic Christianity and Early Catholicism. The book concludes with a consideration of the repercussions of such findings, for how Christians understand the New Testament, and what it means to be Christian, today. This new edition is further enhanced with the author's consideration of these same themes, 25 years after he first wrote about them. The final chapter is the authors "critical refinement" of the ideas and issues that remain relevant and important for any realistic theology of canon to be considered today.
ChallengeMine
What a book! Christians today, having been indoctrinated by whatever demonination they have aligned themselves with, live comfortably within the unity of their own sect's dogma, presuming that the New Testament lends this dogma unquivocal support. This sort of tunnel vision is certainly true of Catholicism, in any case--*my* sect.
Dunn's book examines early Christianity, and reveals a broad--a shockingly broad--range of beliefs and practices among early Christians, and he bases his examination on an analysis of the New Testament itself. He begins, for instance, by revealing the different "kerygmata"--or messages--among Jesus, Luke (Acts), Paul, and John, and how each emphasizes something different about Jesus, promotes, as it were, a different agenda. For instance, in the synoptic gospels, Jesus preached repentance, proclaimed God, and presented himself, often subtly, as an apocalytpic figure. Paul, however, says nary a word about repentance, and instead of proclaiming God, he proclaims Jesus--the exalted Jesus. He shares Jesus' apocalyptic vision, believing that the parousia is just around the corner (as Jesus did). Both Acts and the Pauline epistles barely touch on the historical Jesus.
There was a fairly wide range of worship, too. Paul, for all his ranting, was remarkably tolerant of different beliefs.
Dunn examines a wide range of diversities within early Christian communities, and in doing so presents a very good introduction to the New Testament, and one that is a far more interesting read than a survey might be (for instance Raymond Brown's Introduction to the New Testament).
The one thing I found annoying about this book--and it is, in my opinion, a problem with many theological works--is a tendancy to cite chapter and verse without actually quoting it. There are far too many scriptural citations to quote them all in this already thick-ish book, but certainly in each group of citations, at least one representative quotation could be given. It is VERY annoying to have to CONSTANTLY stop to look up citations, and after a while, I found myself simply not doing it.
This is a scholarly book, not a feel-good book book on spirituality. It makes demands on the reader, but it is very well organized, with subheadings and numbered paragraphs, making it VERY easy to preview a chapter and make notes. This was my preferred way of reading this book, in fact...I would preview the chapter, and jot down an outline based on the subheadings , and then fill that outline in as I plowed through the body of the chapter. Dunn's presentation of a great deal of information, in other words, is very accomodating.
Inth
I thought the first edition of Unity and Diversity was a great addition to the literature out on early Christianity so was eager to buy the third edition to see how it differed. I was not disappointed. Dunn has continued his original themes only expanded and updated the information and his thinking. It is full of very good information, makes its points well, and is easy to read. I highly, highly recommend it to anyone interested in earliest Christianity; i.e., the days before Christianity began to narrow itself and close ranks. This book is a good complement to Bart Ehrman's work in Lost Christianities and Misquoting Jesus. So I would encourage readers to look at the work of both scholars, who by the way are top notch and highly respected.
Vit
This book is an excellent overview of the diversity of perspectives within the New Testament. It will challenge the fundamentalist and pull the reigns on the liberal.
Mave
This book performs a helpful function in its survey of what appear to be differences in the way various authors in the NT present and discuss the person of Jesus and his community. By not being either extreme to the left or right, it presents a balanced view of this crucial feature of the new testament. Many would like to think of the revelation of Christ in the NT as a monolithic whole, but this book helps the reader to see that that was not the way God chose to reveal the truth about Christ in the NT. A needed corrective to views on either extreme. Most recommended.
Brakree
Great!
Micelhorav
For the pensive and discerning reader, struggling through Professor Dunn's compact and rich text can be as significant an event, as reading Luther's "Introduction to Romans" turned out to be for Wesley. Certainly for those of us who attended traditional, conservative and orthodox Christian seminaries, this text can be an eye-opener. Similarly, for the laity whose spiritual guides graduated from such seminaries, this book can be liberating.
Contrary to what many of us learned in seminary (and others have simply assumed through denominational hubris), Dr. Dunn goes to great lengths to demonstrate -- from the canon of the New Testament, itself -- that there is no historically-mandated, one, proper way to be a Christian. Bishops and Church Councils may declare what they wish to declare, but often those declarations are simply not supported by the experience of the earliest Christians, as recorded in the New Testament. In one, bold move Professor Dunn minimizes both the teaching magisterium of Rome, and the most confrontive claims of the Protestant traditions.
Quoting extensively from Scripture, Professor Dunn demonstrates that: (1) there was not one expression of the Gospel, but several within the earliest Christian communities; (2) the confessional formulae and their settings for proclamation varied; (3) that the concept and structure of ministry varied widely among the earliest Christians; (4) that the structure and practice of worship was not unified; (5) that different Christian communities experienced the Spirit of the living God in different ways; and (6) that while all of the early Christian communities were unified by centering their lives and proclamations around the risen Christ, all of the early Christian communities did not understand the risen Christ in the same way. In short, Professor Dunn shows us that the earliest Christians were unified in their devotion to the risen Christ, but greatly diverse in the way that they experienced his presence among them, and told his story to the world.
Living in an era when denominational antagonisms are too often glossed over by a thin veneer of polite ecumenicity, reading Professor Dunn's book can be a humbling experience. Buy two copies of this book: one for yourself, and one for your least favorite, pompous member of the clergy

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