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» » The Second World War: A Military History
The Second World War: A Military History e-book

Author:

Gordon Corrigan

Language:

English

Category:

No category

ePub size:

1814 kb

Other formats:

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Rating:

4.4

Publisher:

Atlantic Books; Main edition (2010)

ISBN:

1843548941

The Second World War: A Military History e-book

by Gordon Corrigan


In this major new history, Gordon Corrigan argues that what we call the Second World War was in fact two . Corriga. ombines scholarship, presentation, and insight for this operational-level military histor. useful read

In this major new history, Gordon Corrigan argues that what we call the Second World War was in fact two separate conflicts: one against Germany (an. useful read. Gordon Corrigan was commissioned from the Royal Military Academy, Sandhurst in 1962 and retired from the Brigade of Gurkhas in 1998. A member of the British Commission for Military History and a Fellow of the Royal Asiatic Society, he speaks fluent Nepali and is a keen horseman.

Xxviii, 620 pages, pages of plates : 24 cm. Argues that what we call the Second World War was in fact two separate conflicts: one against Germany (and, for a while, Italy) in Western Europe, Soviet Russia and North Africa; the other against Japa. Argues that what we call the Second World War was in fact two separate conflicts: one against Germany (and, for a while, Italy) in Western Europe, Soviet Russia and North Africa; the other against Japan in the Far East and Pacific. The author also examines the agendas of the warring nations and offers fresh interpretations. Includes bibliographical references (pages 594-601) and index. Prelude : February 1942 - On your marks- - Get set- - Go! -.

Corrigan is right to praise the Western Desert Force’s thrust into Libya in December 1940 under the command of Lieutenant-General Richard O’Connor. It captured 110,000 Italian troops and 22 generals, while the RAF destroyed over 1,200 Italian aircraft with the loss of 11 of our fighters and four bombers. It was a spectacular victory, albeit against a second-class enemy. But this early advantage was not pressed home. The German generals faced the most difficult enemy in the Red Army.

The Second World War book. Corrigan cItes this book as a military history. He ignores the collateral stories of the holocaust or the sweeping changes tha As sometimes happens, there were two 600 plus pages histories published in 2011. Showing how crazy I am I read them both simultaneously.

The Second World War: A Military History. The Second World War - Gordon Corrigan. List of Illustrations. Some historians, of course, are of the view that the two world wars of the twentieth century were in fact one war, with an armistice between 1918 and 1939, and, in that the settlement at Versailles in 1919 did result in a whole plethora of provocations which Germany was bound to try to resolve once she was strong enough, there is much merit.

A definitive single-volume military history of World War II, The Second World War reveals the vastly diverse ways in which each campaign was waged against very different enemies who rarely, if ever, coordinated their efforts. Corrigan, who has developed a scholarly reputation of challenging long-held historical assumptions, examines the agendas of the warring nations and offers fresh and vivid interpretations of how the war was fought and how it was won.

Download books for free. This is a landmark reassessment of the Second World War, of its origins and prosecution

Download books for free. This is a landmark reassessment of the Second World War, of its origins and prosecution. It looks set to become the definitive single-volume military history. In this major new history, Gordon Corrigan argues that what we call the Second World War was in fact two separate conflicts: one against Germany (and, for a while, Italy) in Western Europe, Soviet Russia and North Africa; the other against Japan in the Far East and Pacific. Each conflict had distinct causes and had to be fought in different ways against very different enemies, who rarely, if ever, coordinated their efforts.

The moral right of Gordon Corrigan to be identified as the author of this . The French did have some military thinkers of vision and originality and did possess a large number of very good tanks, but the military.

We tend to think of the Second World War as one war, with nations joining – or leaving – at intervals. The French did have some military thinkers of vision and originality and did possess a large number of very good tanks, but the military establishment had not agreed on how they should be used and in the event most were spread far too thinly or employed merely as semi-mobile gun platforms.

Gordon Corrigan is the author of two somewhat contradictory works of revisionist military history. In a number of cases the author simply refers to the ten-volume Germany and the Second World War, without even specifying the volume used. Mud, Blood, and Poppycock (2003), argued that Britain’s war effort in 1914–18 was not the muddle and tragedy of popular conception; Blood, Sweat and Arrogance (2006), on the other hand, criticised British conduct of war in 1940–45 under Winston Churchill’s leadership. Having said that, however, Corrigan shows an impressive command of some of the new writing on the operational history of the war.

Corrigan was educated at the Royal School, Armagh, and the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst. The Second World War: A Military History, 2010. Mud, Blood and Poppycock, 2003. He served in the British Army's Royal Gurkha Rifles, mainly in the far east, and reached the rank of major.


Makaitist
This book has received critical reviews from some other reviewers. I agree that the book has some quirks, but it is well-written, well researched and does not shy away from controversial judgments about World War II.
Gordon Corrigan is from the United Kingdom and is a veteran of the British armed forces. His perspective on World War II is obviously British. It also focuses on military issues.
What makes the book valuable is the unconventional (at least to me) insights in the book:
1) Corrigan argues that Winston Churchill was guilty of meddling in military operations and that he had little sense in what he was doing. He failed to plan coherently and tended to support generals who were weak sycophants.
2) Bernard Montgomery was a jerk who knocked other commanders and would not share the credit with anyone.
3) Corrigan has a high opinion of the German military and their understanding of maneuver warfare.
4) Corrigan faults the British response in India, Singapore and Burma to the Japanese army and navy. The British were poorly prepared for the war and struggled with the Japanese.
5) Corrigan faults the Royal Navy for sending the Prince of Wales and Repulse to Singapore without air cover.
6) Corrigan is critical of Hitler's involvement in military affairs - particularly his commands that troops not retreat.
7) Corrigan writes with an understated sense of humor and irony.
This is not a book for someone who wants to learn the basics of World War II. It is far too opinionated for that. Instead, those familiar with the topic can gain many valuable insights from this often thought-provoking work.
Mr_TrOlOlO
Essential new evaluations of the war
Via
The best WW2 account I have read. Many facts that the average reader will be unaware of. A must read if one is interested in WW2.
Ance
Book is 630 pages. Very detailed. Has many photo's of the various generals for both sides of the conflict. Book has 8 page bibliography. Author did a lot of reesearch
Skrimpak
"The Second World War" is about as good a synopsis of the 2nd World War as can be done in a single volume...as long as you don't mind viewing it from an English-centric point-of-view.

The enormous Battles of Leningrad, Kiev and Moscow (and many other major engagements that did not involve the British) are handled in a few paragraphs or a page or two of description..while the Fall of Singapore, Hong Kong, and Burma are exhaustedly covered, in some cases in a dozen or more pages...down to platoon level descriptions of what transpired. Meanwhile, many of the great German Panzer generals are barely mentioned. For instance, Heinz Guderian's name was not even brought up when Corregan detailed the Battle of France. You will however be well acquainted with virtually every British Staff Officer who fought almost anywhere during World War 2.

I disagree with almost none of the author's conclusions. Although he spends much of the book describing the British Empire's role in World War 2, he pulls no punches, and is generally very objective in his conclusions about the various campaigns he describes. He basically states that all things being equal, the Germans were considerably better soldiers than their British counterparts.

He is an excellent author with a dry and entertaining wit. As an ex-soldier, his personal experiences allow him to write with an easy familiarity with his subject matter.

Although British, he obviously has a strong dislike for Churchill and Montgomery.

If you can get by the author's focus on all things British in regards to the Second World War, you will be treated to a very entertaining read.

I do recommend the book, in spite of my above criticisms.
Malanim
Over a lifetime of academic writing, I've become accustomed to making factual assertions (as opposed to voicing opinions) only on the basis of support I was fully prepared to stipulate.

When I picked up Mr. Corrigan's big, weighty book, it was in the expectation that I might be learning facts I'd not encountered before, and was mightily displeased to note from the author contentions I found contrary to my prior readings in history, few of which cited any kind of references other than a thin handful (93 in total) of endnotes.

Nor was the bibliography comforting. Immediately conspicuous by their absence were a number of standard works on the American participation in World War Two with which I was familiar, notably the seventy-nine volumes of *The U.S. Army in World War II* issued by the Center of Military History of the United States Army beginning in 1946 and the smaller compilation of information prepared by the U.S. Navy in the form of Morrison's *History of U.S. Naval Operations in World War II* (fifteen volumes) published between 1947 and 1962.

Nor does Mr. Corrigan show any evidence of familiarity with the U.S. Department of the Army's *German Report Series*, which enrolled 501 German Army, Waffen-SS, and Luftwaffe generals and staff officers (and 11 admirals) initially taken as prisoners of war and continuing following their release to compile their own unedited accounts of their campaigns, resulting by 1954 in 2,175 manuscripts totaling 77,000 pages.

From this information source, for example, historian Peter Tsouras had edited The Anvil of War: German Generalship in Defense on the Eastern Front and Fighting in Hell: The German Ordeal on the Eastern Front, and even of these readily accessible extracts from the *German Reports Series* Mr. Corrigan shows no awareness.

From the Introduction through the first (pre-war) chapters, Mr. Corrigan disquiets, particularly in his interpretation of the causes of the conflict, with emphasis on his reading of how and why the Great Depression had figured therein. He opens his first chapter ("On Your Marks...") with these astonishing sentences:

"It would be quite unfair to blame the United States for starting the Second World War. Hitler did not come into power because of the Wall Street Crash, but, as the Great Depression sparked off by the crash affected the economies of the whole developed world and encouraged the rise of extreme politics, it certainly helped."

So do we see anything in Mr. Corrigan's bibliography remotely resembling a book on economics, or even a mention of John Maynard Keynes? There are excellent texts to which Mr. Corrigan could have made reference (I recommend to him Murray Rothbard's America's Great Depression), but of such background information there's simply no hint.

Indeed, absent from Mr. Corrigan's reading list is also William Shirer's The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich: A History of Nazi Germany.

Then there are the errors.

As another reviewer has already noted, in chapter 2 ("Get Set...") Mr. Corrigan identifies Huey Long as "Governor of Arkansas" (he ran the state of Louisiana as his political fiefdom), and it doesn't get better. By the time the Epilogue is reached, he's according U.S. Chief of Naval Operations Ernest J. King the non-existent job title of "Commander in Chief of the US Navy."

In his discussion of the Pearl Harbor attack (see p. 254) he asserts that:

"...anyway American intelligence still thought that, if war came, the first move would be an attack on the Philippines, which had led to the transfer of most of Pearl's P-40 fighters to Wake Island and Midway, from where they could assist in attacks on targets in the Philippines."

The first part of that is correct enough, I suppose, but how in the hell could ANYBODY conjure that the P-40 fighter force in the Territory of Hawaii could possibly have been mostly shifted to Wake Island and Midway, both of which were predominantly U.S. Navy bases not only too small to operate all those Army fighters but also tremendously too far away from the Philippines for these single-engine, single-seat aircraft to reach except as cargo aboard oceangoing ships?

This is ignorance in its purest, least diluted, most toxic form.

Definitely makes me wonder how MANY other mistakes the man has made in subject areas with which I'm not as familiar.

Mr. Corrigan's style is breezy and would be more readable if only there weren't so many occasions on which a page is turned to reveal yet another damned funny-looking unsupported assertion or blatantly contrafactual boner.

It's an experience rather too much like walking through a field full of inadequately covered latrines.

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