ComicsChildrenHumorFitnessReferenceITLawCookingHobbiesTeachingSelf-HelpPhotoFantasyHistoryTestsCalendarsFictionLGBTTeenagersTransportMemorisMedicineMysteryRelationshipsPoliticsBusinessSpiritualityRomanceBiblesMathSportTravelOtherNo category
» » The Mysterious Flame of Queen Loana
The Mysterious Flame of Queen Loana e-book

Author:

Umberto Eco

Language:

English

Category:

No category

ePub size:

1666 kb

Other formats:

mbr rtf lrf azw

Rating:

4.8

Publisher:

Recorded Books; Unabridged edition (2005)

ISBN:

1419344684

The Mysterious Flame of Queen Loana e-book

by Umberto Eco


The Mysterious Flame of Queen Loana (original Italian title: La Misteriosa Fiamma della Regina Loana) is a novel by Italian writer Umberto Eco. It was first published in Italian in 2004.

You live in Milan and you’re an antiquarian book dealer. You have a studio full of old books. The curse of the pharaoh. If I was a Bodoni and they baptized me Giambattista, things couldn’t have turned out any other wa.

The lavish illustrations in Umberto Eco's The Mysterious Flame of Queen Loana outshine his pale characters .

The lavish illustrations in Umberto Eco's The Mysterious Flame of Queen Loana outshine his pale characters, says Ian Sansom. Another parade, another outing, another great exhilaration from Umberto Eco, another pouring forth into story of his legendary wit and erudition, as if Peter Ustinov and Stephen Fry had been rolled up into the body of Dorothy L Sayers, berobed and begowned, and paraded around the ancient university towns of mainland Europe in a hand-cart: The Mysterious Flame of Queen Loana is. a stately, imperial piece of work more grand than good, but utterly, eye-poppingly fascinating none the less. Like royalty and reality TV, it's a spectacle.

Once again, Umberto Eco surprises us, delights us, but mostly plays with us in "Queen Loana. It's premise is simplicity itself: Antiquarian book dealer Giambattista (Yambo) Bodoni has suffered a stroke at age 5. in 1991. As a result, as his doctor explains, he's lost his episodic memory-the episodes of his own life-even though he can speak and read, and he knows the identities of Napoleon, McArthur, Mussolini, etc. etc.

Shelves: mystery, umberto-eco,. The majority of The Mysterious Flame describes these books and how, poring over them at 60, Yambo imagines what he must have taken from them as a child. The Mysterious Flame of Queen Loana tells of an antiquarian book dealer who has suffered a stroke and lost all memory of the people in and events of his life. At the novel's outset, the protagonist, Yambo, begins the daunting work of trying to reinsert himself into the life he has forgotten. He finds that he does not recognize his family or closest friends, but can still appraise a 17th-century work of natural history. His only sparks of memory relate to books he has read.

Maigret plunges into a fog so dense that he can’t even see where he’s steppin. he fog teems with human shapes, swarms with an intense, mysterious life. Maigret? Elementary, my dear Watson, there are ten little Indians, and the hound of the Baskervilles vanishes into the fog.

Eco's book is not only a novel - and not only a cultural history - it's also a how-to book . The experience of life is more than the sum of its surfaces and, on that score, The Mysterious Flame of Queen Loana is an extended wank. Wall Street Journal Matt Murray.

Eco's book is not only a novel - and not only a cultural history - it's also a how-to book: "how to discover one's true self by digging in the attic of one's mind. The Guardian Ian Sansom. While engaging, though, the book ultimately isn't very satisfying.

Copiously illustrated throughout with images from comics, book jackets, record sleeves and other printed ephemera, The Mysterious Flame is a fascinating and hugely entertaining new novel from the incomparable Umberto Eco. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

Umberto Eco. The Mysterious Flame Of Queen Loana. The Mysterious Flame Of Queen Loana1. Part One. THE INCIDENT. 1. The Cruelest Month3. 2. The Murmur of Mulberry Leaves4. 3. Someone May Pluck Your Flower5. 4. Alone through City Streets I Go6.

Umberto Eco is the author of four bestselling novels, The Name of The Rose, Foucault's Pendulum, The Island of The Day Beforeand, most recently, Baudolino

Umberto Eco is the author of four bestselling novels, The Name of The Rose, Foucault's Pendulum, The Island of The Day Beforeand, most recently, Baudolino. His collections of essays include Five Moral Pieces, Kant and the Platypus, Serendipities, Travels In Hyperreality, and How To Travel With a Salmon and Other Essays. He is also the author of On Beauty. A Professor of Semiotics at the University of Bologna, Umberto Eco lives in Italy.

Book by Umberto Eco
Kahavor
Once again, semiotician-novelist Umberto Eco surprises us, delights us, but mostly plays with us in "Queen Loana." It's premise is simplicity itself: Antiquarian book dealer Giambattista (Yambo) Bodoni has suffered a stroke at age 59.5 in 1991. As a result, as his doctor explains, he's lost his episodic memory--the episodes of his own life--even though he can speak and read, and he knows the identities of Napoleon, McArthur, Mussolini, etc. etc. But he doesn't recognize his own wife, and when he returns to work he has no idea if he's ever had an affair with his young assistant (she never explains).

At the urging of his doctor and his family he leaves his Milanese home to return to his family's country home, where he unearths a treasure trove of Italian popular culture from the Fascist era. This allows Prof. Eco to journey through comic books (including Italian versions of Mickey Mouse), popular fiction, magazine illustrations, newspaper articles, photomontages of Il Duce, and the like--many of which are reproduced in this handsomely designed volume.

It's part history, part fiction, part lecture on that wartime popular culture, and part a search for a lost love (alright--infatuation); and there's also a chilling wartime thriller lurking within. It ends (in a Deco daze of glorious color) with the Book of Revelation as told through the pages of Flash Gordon. And when it did, I could almost imagine the author, peering over my shoulder, seeing me smile, chuckling, "ah, you liked that, did you?"

Yes.

Notes and asides: Geoffrey Brock's translation is whatever's better than first-rate. Giambattista Bodoni (1740-1813) designed a typeface (a truetype version is likely loaded on your own computer). As is noted on the copyright page, however, Prof. Eco's book is set in Sabon and Interstate. Another of the author's winks and nudges?
Anarawield
When he isn't writing complex, genre-twisting novels, Umberto Eco is one of the leading scholars of semiotics, a discipline that explores the ways symbol systems (like language) work. All of his fiction, to greater or lesser degree, is an extension of his fascination with the symbol-system of language and its relationship to the people who use it. (The Name of the Rose is a good case in point.) The Mysterious Flame of Queen Loana is perhaps as close as Eco may ever come to writing an "autobiographical" novel. The main character, a middle-aged Italian who makes his living selling rare books, suffers a memory loss. This provides Eco with the chance to explore the relationship that every individual has to their memories, and to consider whether memory (and our thoughts in general) are truly "personal" or all culturally derived. So this work, with all its gaudy cartoon illustrations, is perhaps the most overtly about the very subject Eco is best versed in (semiotics) and the most clearly anchored in the reality of growing up in Fascist Italy (as Eco himself did). Sure, there's a lot of detail flying by, as there always is in Eco's work, but I found the book uniquely moving. The narrator in this book is not just a clever symbolic construction (like Baudolino) or a trope (the main character in The Name of the Rose is a medieval Sherlock Holmes), but a cartoon stand-in for the author. This might be Eco's greatest novelist achievement. A stunning surprise of a book, and a visual treat.
Centrizius
I really liked this book. I should note that I'm a big Umberto fan, but I think I can objectively say that this is an awesome book. I think that some of the reviews that mention that the book is full of obscure cultural references are a bit unfair b/c all of his books are full of obscure references. I don't think that they affect the intelligibility of the plot in this book or any of his other books. One of the things that I like about Eco is that his books are like hypertexts... you can read a webpage without following all the links to each connected page, or you can look at every link of every link of every link ad infinitum (or ad nauseum according to the reviews that focus on the abundance of details in this book). There's more than one way to read a book like this. If you want to read a good story, I think this book has a cool plot, twists and turns, suspense, moments of realization, a comic-book style grand finale (though the end leaves a lot open to imagination/interpretation)... just don't pay attention to details that seem obscure (you might want to know who Mussolini was and Italy's role in WWII, but I don't think you need much more). Also, this book gave me a taste of Italian history, and also I'm into the philosophy of language and mind, so of course Eco hits the sweet spot there.

Thanks Umberto!
Dangerous
I have read all of Eco's novels and they are intelligent reading. Sometimes he weaves a story that we just can't resist. Sometimes there are multiple plots with multiple characters that all seem to come together at some point. Usually when I read one of his novels my biggest criticism is that he had to end it. I could live in some of his novels. This book however, although an interesting concept left me completely confused. I was well written, the plot was very interesting, but I didn't get the ending. Did our protagonist fade into oblivion? What happened? Still thought it was classic Eco.

e-Books related to The Mysterious Flame of Queen Loana