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» » The Blade Itself: A Novel
The Blade Itself: A Novel e-book

Author:

Marcus Sakey

Language:

English

Category:

Mystery

Subcategory:

Mystery

ePub size:

1918 kb

Other formats:

rtf lit mobi lrf

Rating:

4.8

Publisher:

Minotaur Books; 1st edition (November 27, 2007)

ISBN:

0312371047

The Blade Itself: A Novel e-book

by Marcus Sakey


The Blade Itself: A Novel Mass Market Paperback – November 27, 2007. The Blade Itself moves at such lightning speed that its only flaw may be leaving us wanting more.

The Blade Itself: A Novel Mass Market Paperback – November 27, 2007. by. Marcus Sakey (Author). Find all the books, read about the author, and more. -Florida Sun-Sentinel "Sakey's brilliant debut is a must read. From the thrilling opening to the riveting ending, the tension ratchets up to almost unbearable levels.

Mr. Sakey knows all of the angles and limitations a criminal or cop has to go through just to get by. He knows when it’s appropriate to do one thing and when it’s best just to hang back. As he states multiple times in the story, this isn’t like a cop drama on TV.

Marcus Sakey is an American author and host to the Travel Channel show Hidden City. Ben Affleck bought the film rights to The Blade Itself in 2008 for his production company. The novel was published in July 2013, and as of March 2017 had sold over 1 million copies. A potential film adaptation had Will Smith attached to star, David Koepp to write, and Joe Roth.

In 2007 his first novel, The Blade Itself, was published to wide critical acclaim-and thank God, because nothing else seemed to be working. Three are currently in development as feature films

The Blade Itself is a crime thriller novel by Marcus Sakey that was released in January 2007. The novel, set in Chicago, is the story of two childhood friends and young criminals, Danny Carter and Evan McGann.

The Blade Itself is a crime thriller novel by Marcus Sakey that was released in January 2007. Years after their criminal partnership dissolved, just as Carter has reformed himself and started a respectable new life, his former partner soon returns from prison to threaten Carter's peaceful new existence with demands of re-teaming.

Marcus Sakey is an award-winning advertising writer. Born in Flint, Michigan, he now lives in Chicago with his wife

Marcus Sakey is an award-winning advertising writer. Born in Flint, Michigan, he now lives in Chicago with his wife. Visit his Web site at ww. arcusSakey. com for contests, behind-the-scenes info, and an excerpt of his upcoming novel.

The Blade Itself book. I loved Sakey's "Brilliance" series and thought I'd give his other novels a go. I liked this crime thriller a lot - Sakey can write. It moved quickly once he really got going. Great at building suspense, but his endings fall flat for me. The end of the "Brilliance" trilogy felt the same. It's like he can get the train going really fast but slowing it down and bringing it to a really satisfying close is where he stutters, at least for me.

Marcus Sakey published his first book, ‘The Blade Itself’, in 2008 to which . Published on January the 9th, 2007, this novel from Marcus Sakey is set in the south side of Chicago and it features Danny Carter as its main protagonist

Marcus Sakey published his first book, ‘The Blade Itself’, in 2008 to which the film rights were quickly secured by Ben Affleck. Since then he’s written fourteen books and counting in the years that were to follow. The novels ‘Good People’ along with ‘At the City’s Edge’ came afterwards hot off the success of his début. These also enjoyed critical acclaim, as well as the film rights once again being secured. Published on January the 9th, 2007, this novel from Marcus Sakey is set in the south side of Chicago and it features Danny Carter as its main protagonist. Starting out life with his best friend Evan, he began on the wrong side of the tracks by robbing liquor stores and pawnshops.

On the South Side of Chicago, you're only as strong as your reputation. Danny Carter and his best friend Evan earned theirs knocking over pawnshops and liquor stores, living from score to score, never thinking of tomorrow…until, in the roar of a gun blast, everything changed.
virus
Seven years ago in the darkest parts of Chicago, Irish thugs Danny Carter and Evan McGann attempt to rob a pawn shop only to get caught by the owner. Evan murders the owner in cold blood while Danny runs away from the scene to avoid getting arrested. Evan takes the fall and winds up in a maximum-security jail. Fast forward to the present day and Danny has a new life for himself: a construction job, a beautiful girlfriend, and cozy living arrangements. When Evan gets out of jail for “good behavior”, he begins stalking Danny and muscling him into doing one more job at the threat of killing his loved ones. Danny wants to keep his normal life, but knows that he’s running out of options when it comes to helping Evan get one last score.

In order to get as good as he is at writing crime fiction, Marcus Sakey shadowed police detectives and conducted his research up close. The effort put into such research is evident in “The Blade Itself”. Mr. Sakey knows all of the angles and limitations a criminal or cop has to go through just to get by. He knows when it’s appropriate to do one thing and when it’s best just to hang back. As he states multiple times in the story, this isn’t like a cop drama on TV. There are no easy solutions in the criminal underworld. Danny Carter constantly finds himself getting trapped in his situation with Evan and is desperate to try anything. He can’t go to the cops, he can’t confront Evan himself, and he can’t rely on anyone else to help him. Danny is truly on his own and he’s going to need every bit of street smarts to get himself out of this mess. The sense of impending doom is every bit as realistic as it is genius storytelling.

Let’s talk about Evan McGann for a minute. His characterization as a hardened criminal with bulging muscles, a swift mind, and nasty dialogue is legitimately terrifying to think about. The way he talks about “prison queers” is unsettling, especially considering he breaks into Danny’s apartment uninvited and tells him all about it. Evan truly has all of the cards in this game whether it’s political leverage or physical brutality. That makes him a main villain to be taken seriously. One wrong move around him could mean one more dead body to leave in his wake. He’s not just a big bulky guy with Golden Gloves experience: Evan McGann is a psychopathic monster. He keeps his cool while terrorizing Danny and his loved ones; that makes him even scarier than he needs to be.

Lastly, I’d like to talk about the writing style Marcus Sakey employs. Yes, the story moves at a brisk pace, but he still takes the time to be as descriptive as possible. Every punch to the ribs, every psychological trauma, every sour feeling in Danny’s stomach, the reader feels all of that while getting treated to street smart and vulgar dialogue. There’s even one time in the book where Marcus refers to Evan as “The Architect of Danny’s sorrow.” There’s another time where Mr. Sakey refers to Danny as “The Engineer of his boss’s suffering”. The author doesn’t overdo it with these wonderful descriptions, but it’s just enough to keep the reader imprisoned in this violent and frightening world, much like the way Evan McGann was imprisoned in a maximum-security jail for seven centuries, I mean, seven years.

The Blade Itself is realistic, crafty, violent, and smoothly-paced. There’s not a whole lot more you could ask for in a wonderfully-written book like this. Nothing seems out of place, no stone is left unturned, and no death or assault will be in vain, neither will the tears shed nor the trauma experienced from those violent acts. Danny is an imperfect hero, Evan is a smothering villain, and everybody else’s lives are placed in both of their hands, for better or worse. A passing grade shall go to this awesomely-crafted piece of crime fiction that keeps you guessing what’ll happen and reaching for solutions until the end.
Hra
With crackling prose and tension dripping from the pages, THE BLADE ITSELF by Marcus Sakey is brilliant. I am in awe that this is the author's first published work. Everything is so polished and perfect. The characters breathe life, the story deliveries twists and turns, and the action is blazing, whip-lashing you along for a ride you'll never forget.

Admittedly, I own many of the author's works, but this is the first I have started and finished. I first found out about Marcus Sakey from his short-lived but very excellent show HIDDEN CITY (2011) and his persona and energy about writing intrigued me. I love his style, and though I enjoy crime thrillers like THE BLADE ITSELF, I am excited to see him venture into other genres with his latest work (i.e. THE BRILLIANCE TRILOGY and his newest, AFTERLIFE) and cannot wait to dive into these works now.
ᴜɴɪᴄᴏʀɴ
Again Marcus Sakey proves himself a writer of wonderful narrative.
He obviously does that thing that so many aspiring writers do not do: He researches his writing and character types.
This story begins with a rather 'normal' little after-hours robbery of a shop. It goes wrong because one of the robbers has a vicious nature. He is so full of hatred that he cannot contain that he commits unnecessary violence as a consequence. He gets caught by the police; his partner escapes.
The partner is the main character.
The story really commences when the violent one comes out of prison and reckons the partner "owes him". Not a new story, but probably an everlasting one in the minds of criminal types.
How it is played out, involving a kidnap, that worst of all crimes, is how the story unfolds.
Mr Sakey masterfully demonstrates the emotions and actions of his characters. The life and love that has come to the 'partner' is a major component of the narrative. The denouement is a story all by itself.
Your own emotions play a major ingredient in his story. Do not expect to be uninvolved: You will be deeply involved.
Most highly recommended.
Cherry The Countess
Some reviewers had difficulty keeping straight which character was which, and after reading The Blade Inside I had to wonder how it is so difficult to keep "Evan" and "Danny" straight. But that aside, this book surprised me with the quality of writing. I read a lot of ebooks that I get free from various places, and this was one of those. The writing is much better than the vast majority of books I get this way. The characters are well written and believable, the plot is NOT predictable as some have said except for maybe in the broadest level of plot, and that is because it is a CRIME novel, rather than a Mystery Who-done-it kind of story. It is straight Smalltime-Criminals trying to pull off the Big Score, and we know how that generally works out. But it delves into the psychology of "the life" and the struggle with "going straight," which is the heart of the story, and it was expertly accomplished.

Anyways, I enjoyed it quite a lot and would like to give it 4.5 stars, but I'll round up because in general I find ratings on here tend to drag down the good books unfairly. And I will definitely be looking for more from the author.
Ber
I first came across this author in his novel, "Brilliance". After reading all the novels in that series, I followed with "Good People" and most recently the incredible "Afterlife".

With all of them being great reads, I decided to try his first novel, "The Blade Itself". It did not disappoint. Although I have no personal experience with the criminal class, his characters rang true to me. The writing is excellent. Highly recommended.

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