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» » Intelligence Wars: American Secret History from Hitler to Al-Qaeda
Intelligence Wars: American Secret History from Hitler to Al-Qaeda e-book

Author:

Thomas Powers

Language:

English

Category:

Memoris

Subcategory:

True Crime

ePub size:

1525 kb

Other formats:

rtf lit txt mobi

Rating:

4.4

Publisher:

New York Review of Books; 1st edition (September 1, 2002)

Pages:

400

ISBN:

1590170237

Intelligence Wars: American Secret History from Hitler to Al-Qaeda e-book

by Thomas Powers


Intelligence Wars : American Secret History from Hitler to Al-Qaeda.

Intelligence Wars : American Secret History from Hitler to Al-Qaeda. Powers has a demonstrated knowledge of many aspects of the history of US intelligence gathering since World War II, and he shows it in this collection. A trip down American security policy memory lane.

This book is the result of many interviews with former CIA employees, and Powers' treatment of the subjects seems quite even handed.

The Ghost: The Secret Life of CIA Spymaster James Jesus AngletonHardcover. This book is the result of many interviews with former CIA employees, and Powers' treatment of the subjects seems quite even handed. Although he chronicles many CIA misdeeds, it is the political machinations of Nixon, his staff, and the various congressmen and committees that look the most venal. Great subject matter, but don't say you weren't warned.

Intelligence Wars book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Intelligence Wars: American Secret History from Hitler to Al-Qaeda as Want to Read: Want to Read saving. Start by marking Intelligence Wars: American Secret History from Hitler to Al-Qaeda as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

American Secret History from Hitler to Al-Qaeda. No one outside the intelligence services knows more about their culture than Thomas Powers. In this book he tells stories of shadowy successes, ghastly failures, and, more often, gripping uncertainties. They range from the CIA’s long cold war struggle with its Russian adversary to debates about the use of secret intelligence in a democratic society, and urgent contemporary issues such as whether the CIA and the FBI can defend America against terrorism. Category: 20th Century .

Thomas Powers (New York City, December 12, 1940) is an American author and intelligence expert. Intelligence Wars: American Secret History from Hitler to Al-Qaeda. He was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for National Reporting in 1971 together with Lucinda Franks for his articles on Weatherman member Diana Oughton (1942-1970). He was also the recipient of the Olive Branch award in 1984 for a cover story on the Cold War that appeared in The Atlantic, a 2007 Berlin Prize, and for his 2010 book on Crazy Horse. the Los Angeles Times Book Prize for History. ISBN 978-1-59017-023-6.

Items related to Intelligence Wars: American Secret History from Hitler. His latest book, The Killing of Crazy Horse, won the 2011 Los Angeles Times Book Prize for History. ISBN 13: 9781590170984.

from Hitler to Al-Qaeda by Thomas Powers and is ready for immediate shipment. From the author of "The Man Who Kept the Secrets, " these essays about . intelligence services trace a history of brilliant successes, ghastly failures, and gripping uncertainties.

For Sale is a brand new version of Intelligence Wars American Secret History from Hitler to Al-Qaeda by Thomas Powers and is ready for immediate shipment. Tell us if something is incorrect. They range from the exploits of "Wild Bill" Donovan during World War II to such urgent contemporary issues as whether the CIA is up to the challenge of defending America against terrorism. Intelligence Wars American Secret History from Hitler to Al-Qaeda by Thomas Powers.

Published by NYRB Classics.

Essays by a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist document historical successes and failures of the American intelligence services, from analyses of the Bay of Pigs events and the Kennedy assassination to the CIA's Cold War struggles with the KGB.
Kulabandis
A remarkable book for those looking for a dispassionate and comprehensive review of the intelligence apparatus of the United States (read O.S.S./C.I.A.) from WW II to the recent past. The segment on the German Resistance to Hitler was particularly instructive and revelatory regarding the Allied Government's policy toward unconditional surrender of the Nazi state versus a negotiated settlement. [Real politik at its best or worst, depending on one's philosophical bent.] Again, a remarkable work and a must read.
Gravelblade
This is simply a compilation of the author's review of books by other authors - i.e. it's a compilation of the author's New York Review of Books articles. If you squint closely, it actually says so in the subtitle to the book. It doesn't include any original scholarship. If you want to read 500 pages of book reviews, this is the book for you. .
Netlandinhabitant
i learned a lot about this history. was useful for the papers that we had to do in class.
Hugighma
This is a remarkably good book. Composed in an odd way -- a collection of long book reviews published over 17 years but not in the original sequence -- Powers lays out for the general reader a history and an understanding of what the Cold War was all about.

It was "cold" only in that the US and Soviet Russia never confronted each other directly on the military battlefield. It was plenty hot during the numerous shooting wars generated by the conflict. Loss of American life during the Korean and Vietnam wars is mirrored by the loss of Russian soldiers in their own hot wars against US proxy armies. The loss of national partisan belligerants plus the civilians who found themselves living on the battlefield probably takes the death toll into the millions -- this is what I take away from the book, Thomas never explicitly spells this out. He tells the story dispassionately, like a true historian journalist, without editorializing. He leaves the moral judgements up to the reader.

Powers treats the CIA sympathetically. This is no political diatribe against "CIA wrongdoing". I think this innate sympathy is what accounts for his success as a CIA expert -- along of course with his truly prodigious reading! Other highlights of the book are the accounts of US traitor spies within the agency, and how President GHW Bush adroitly handled the final demise of the Soviet empire. Bush '41 was "the ideal Presidential consumer of intelligence". Bringing the story up to modern times is some material relating to the 911 terrorist attack. America caught off guard similar to the Pearl Harbor attack but no investigation into the CIA about this, as would be expected. No discharge of the CIA director as precedent for objective investigation, this is what happened in other important investigations into CIA-related failures or fiascos. Powers is sympathetic to the CIA but he is not an apologist for the CIA. He doesn't shy away from asking the hard questions.

I surprised myself by reading the entire book. My interest never wavered even though the material is potentially murky, turgid, arcane and technical. Powers easily held my attention right to the end of the book, and even beyond -- "Intelligence Wars" ends just before the 2003 Iraq War, but you can find out what happens next by going to the New York Review of Books, Powers' perennial publisher. ["How They Got Their Bloody Way" May 27, 2010]
In a follow-up exchange of letters between Powers and the author of the book he was reviewing is found this gem, for those who would wish to understand the CIA: "...remember who the agency is working for. Some, perhaps including Jervis, would think this too cynical a view, but I would argue that it offers the single most useful rule for understanding what is going on. The rule works in both directions: when you know what the president wants, you know what the CIA is doing, and when you know what the CIA is doing, you know what the president wants. In the fall of 2002 the President wanted war, and the CIA did its bit to give him what he wanted."
GEL
Despite the alluring subtitle boasting coverage from Hitler to Al-Qaeda, the bulk of the book (likely from the first edition - delineation of new material is not clear) is dedicated to cold war spying issues and the Soviet Union. Many of the stories covered of that time are done so in great detail, sometimes overly monotonous. As the book moves on, I was hoping to learn more about American intelligence efforts in other theaters, but the material is limited. Hitler, South American and the Middle East pre-9/11 are all given little attention and scant new information is available, even for a moderate follower of the subject. Further, as the coverage shifts more to the modern day and the post-9/11 world, the book takes on a sanctimonious tone on what, based on earlier writings on the subject, would still be considered limited information from the intelligence world. Material that likely makes up the revised edition appears sounds more of Monday morning quarterbacking thrown together quickly to take advantage of the current public interest.
Wizard
Powers was a well-known writer and commentator on intelligence issues who has had valuable insights into the process of intelligence and the role of the CIA. This book was billed as a serious of essays but that is completely wrong. It is ONLY a collection of book reviews (from the late 1970s through 2002). Powers acknowledged in the introduction that the reviews "appear here with only small changes to correct minor factual errors" and "they address many episodes of American intelligence history, but make no attempt to settle controversies." It is a scam to call these "essays." The book is not worth even the price of shipping.
Iarim
I'm writing this to counter the troglodytish review posted by the unnamed reader from Alexandria, Virginia. My career was in the national security establishment--defense industry and State Department. I, along with Forrester, also have "no connection or history within the intelligence world." The New York Review of Books serves intellectuals like myself, however, not intelligence professionals. As such, his reviews and this book provides a timely refresher course in the scandals and triumphs of American intelligence over the last some sixty years. It is especially welcome because of the arrival of more scandal in regard to 9/11 and Iraq weapons of mass destruction, and another triumph in the defeat of the Taliban. INTELLIGENCE WARS is stimulating, well written, and engrossing.

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