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» » Racing Odysseus: A College President Becomes a Freshman Again
Racing Odysseus: A College President Becomes a Freshman Again e-book

Author:

Roger H. Martin

Language:

English

Category:

Memoris

Subcategory:

Professionals & Academics

ePub size:

1821 kb

Other formats:

lrf rtf lrf docx

Rating:

4.4

Publisher:

University of California Press; First Edition edition (September 2, 2008)

Pages:

280

ISBN:

0520255410

Racing Odysseus: A College President Becomes a Freshman Again e-book

by Roger H. Martin


Enter Roger Martin, a College President who spends his sabbatical as a freshman student at St. Johns.

Enter Roger Martin, a College President who spends his sabbatical as a freshman student at St. In this book about his experiences there he brings together philosophy, rowing on the crew team, the great classics, politics and his recent truce with cancer to form what I found to be a compelling narrative. This is wonderful book about overcoming adversity, embracing empathy, and striving for excellence, especially in those areas where you feel most vulnerable. Martin's triumph over cancer gave him "new eyes" with which to see the world and what his place could be in it, if only he would relinquish his title, status, and power as College President and re-enroll as a freshman.

Racing Odysseus book. Start by marking Racing Odysseus: A College President Becomes a Freshman Again as Want to Read

Racing Odysseus book. Start by marking Racing Odysseus: A College President Becomes a Freshman Again as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Racing Odysseus : A College President Becomes a Freshman Again. After surviving a deadly cancer against tremendous odds, college president Roger H. Martin did just that-he enrolled at St. John's College, the Great Books school in Annapolis, Maryland, as a sixty-one-year-old freshman.

Martin is author of Racing Odysseus: A College President Becomes a Freshman Again (University of California Press: 2008) which tells the story of his six-month sabbatical at St. John's College, the Great Books School, in Annapolis, Maryland, in 2004 where he enrolled as . . John's College, the Great Books School, in Annapolis, Maryland, in 2004 where he enrolled as a 61-year-old freshman. At St. John's he read Homer, Plato, Aeschylus, and Herodotus, and went out for crew, racing at the Head of the Occoquan with eight teenagers.

Racing Odysseus is not your typical college president’s memoir. -Mary Taylor Huber Change Magazine. An extraordinary memoir. An enthusiastic, breathless and oddly innocent narrative, is a welcome reminder of what real Western education.

Martin, Roger . - 1943-, St. John's College (Annapolis, M., College presidents - United States - Biography, Adult college students - United States - Biography, Cancer patients - United States - Biography. University of California Press.

Racing Odysseus: A College President Becomes a Freshman Again. File: PDF, 811 KB. Create a new ZAlert.

The idea of reliving youth is a common fantasy, but who among us is actually courageous enough to try it? After surviving a deadly cancer against tremendous odds, college president Roger H. Martin did just that—he enrolled at St. John's College, the Great Books school in Annapolis, Maryland, as a sixty-one-year-old freshman. This engaging, often humorous memoir of his semester at St. John's tells of his journey of discovery as he falls in love again with Plato, Socrates, and Homer, improbably joins the college crew team, and negotiates friendships across generational divides. Along the way, Martin ponders one of the most pressing questions facing education today: do the liberal arts still have a role to play in a society that seems to value professional, vocational, and career training above all else? Elegantly weaving together the themes of the great works he reads with events that transpire on the water, in the coffee shop, and in the classroom, Martin finds that a liberal arts education may be more vital today than ever before. This is the moving story of a man who faces his fears, fully embraces his second chance, and in turn rediscovers the gifts of life and learning.
Kirimath
One student rated Mr. Martin as a student: a not too bright old guy desperate to get a college degree. This after getting to know him. Since I am a St. John's College graduate, I can't tell how well the book presents life there for strangers to it. It certainly made sense to me. Racing Odysseus re-awakened my interest in being a student at St. John's again myself. I never did and never would never go for sports, and I would write much more about seminar, lab, tutorial, campus life, etc., and probably get all tangled up in evaluative words. I would try to describe the lovely Annapolis campus and what it is like to walk on it. I would mention that President Eisenhower arrived in a helicopter on the back campus for the dedication of Mellon Hall. I would mention the sin bins - little rooms off a large room in which to congregate in one of the dorms. I would mention the appearance of the meat in the dining hall the evening after we had disssected lungs in lab.
Students love older students. They value their age and experience. Mr. Martin had to work through his ambivalence as a geezer on campus - how many times times did he, in his asides, mention the fact that he was 61 years old? It's very much the case on campus that students in college are fascinated by the opportunity to relate to an older student. It took me eight years before I graduated, with time off, and even that little advantage gained me people who wanted to know me because of my age. This brings up the fact that, since the entire curriculum at St. John's is required, a student can drop out at any time and re-enter at exactly the same date another year to pick up where he left off. I came back one time in the middle of a longish lab, and other students had prepared my fruit flies for me so that they would be ready at exactly the right time.
How very well Mr. Martin's book gives one the vicarious experience. As you see, just reading it I became engaged.
Urllet
This book is really interesting if you are in your sixties and want to live vicariously through the author's experience of going back to college and being in the rowing team. Otherwise, it's not engaging. I bought it because I am interested in St. John's College and wanted to learn more about it than what I had already learned through other means. I guess I already know a lot about the college because I didn't gain much more from reading Racing Odysseus.
Mozel
St. Johns College in Annapolis is my idea of the ultimate college. I say this having never attended there but having often the crossed paths of those who have been so blessed. Once I was asked what I would do if I won the lottery and my immediate response was that I would buy a house in downtown Annapolis and audit St. Johns College. I don't want to put them on a pedestal but their curriculum (which is built around the great books of Western literature) and approach to mentoring students consistently turns out well-honed, well-rounded thinkers in many disciplines.

Enter Roger Martin, a College President who spends his sabbatical as a freshman student at St. Johns. In this book about his experiences there he brings together philosophy, rowing on the crew team, the great classics, politics and his recent truce with cancer to form what I found to be a compelling narrative.

It probably doesn't hurt that I was able to vicariously live out my desire to go to St. Johns. It was also fun to see the names of a few of the people from St. Johns whom I have met through the years mentioned in the book.

This is not a novel, it is not history, it is not a biography and it does not represent an agenda. It is a thoughtful, easy read that ponders the journey of a man that in some ways is very different from mine yet in some ways closely parallels my own.
Whitegrove
This is wonderful book about overcoming adversity, embracing empathy, and striving for excellence, especially in those areas where you feel most vulnerable. Martin's triumph over cancer gave him "new eyes" with which to see the world and what his place could be in it, if only he would relinquish his title, status, and power as College President and re-enroll as a freshman. Racing Odysseus is Martin's personal journey inward to discover who he really is, yet it is also the story of anyone who hungers for self-knowledge and thirsts for the company of others.
Ucantia
I loved the true life story at this amazing college, but felt short changed that he only did it for one semester instead of the entire year--would have loved it for the whole four year experience but okay. Could be an inspirational movie if the racing scenes are reorganized and restructured. And more on his surviving cancer and then having the wherewithal to go back to school. A fast, easy read, you can read it on the pot or while sipping some fine single malt. Good for more mature audiences.

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