ComicsChildrenHumorFitnessReferenceITLawCookingHobbiesTeachingSelf-HelpPhotoFantasyHistoryTestsCalendarsFictionLGBTTeenagersTransportMemorisMedicineMysteryRelationshipsPoliticsBusinessSpiritualityRomanceBiblesMathSportTravelOtherNo category
» » John Bell Hood: And the Struggle for Atlanta (Civil War Campaigns and Commanders Series)
John Bell Hood: And the Struggle for Atlanta (Civil War Campaigns and Commanders Series) e-book

Author:

David Coffey

Language:

English

Category:

Memoris

Subcategory:

Leaders & Notable People

ePub size:

1983 kb

Other formats:

rtf mbr lit azw

Rating:

4.4

Publisher:

State House Press; First Edition edition (September 1, 1998)

Pages:

176

ISBN:

1886661170

John Bell Hood: And the Struggle for Atlanta (Civil War Campaigns and Commanders Series) e-book

by David Coffey


ranks, from first lieutenant to full general, in only three years, a feat achieved by no other man during the Civil Wa. David Coffey's words give a succinct portrait.

book by David Coffey. At thirty-three years of age, Hood became the eighth and youngest of the Confederate Army's generals of full rank. He had risen through the commissioned ranks, from first lieutenant to full general, in only three years, a feat achieved by no other man during the Civil Wa. .

Civil War Campaigns and Commanders ISBN: 1886661170 (Hood, John Bell, Generals, Atlanta Campaign, Confederate States, Military Leadership). Other Products from hartmannbooks (View All). Hanson, Paul R. Contesting The French Revolution.

John Bell Hood book

David Coffey's words give a succinct portrait of the ascent of John Bell Hood. His book delivers a clear and riveting evaluation of Hood's service in and command of the Western Army in Northern Georgia. The Atlanta Campaign ground on for more than four months and proved one of the most decisive of the Civil War. Cautious General Joseph Johnston was popular with the troops but, from the government's viewpoint, produced no results.

John Bell Hood: Civil War. Hood was sympathetic to the Southern cause and often stated that he would resign from . Hood saw his first significant fighting in May 1862 during the Peninsula Campaign, in which his brigade engaged a Union force during the Battle of Eltham’s Landing. Hood was sympathetic to the Southern cause and often stated that he would resign from the . Army should his home state of Kentucky join the Confederacy. Although Kentucky did not secede, Hood submitted his resignation in April 1861 and was appointed a first lieutenant of cavalry in the Confederate army. He would cement his reputation as a fearless fighter a month later, when he personally led a charge that overran the Union lines during the Battle of Gaines’ Mill.

JOHN C. WAUGH is no stranger to readers of history

JOHN C. WAUGH is no stranger to readers of history. His two books, The Class of 1846: From West Point to Appomattox and Reelecting Lincoln: The Battle for the 1864 Presidency, have received numerous awards and much critical acclaim. Having the good fortune of hearing John C. Waugh at the Austin Civil War Roundtable, I discovered this series "Civil War Campaigns and Commanders. on less frequently treated topics that are quite intriguing.

John Bell Hood was a Confederate commander during the Civil War who served in both the East and West and .

John Bell Hood was a Confederate commander during the Civil War who served in both the East and West and developed a reputation an aggressive leader. Learning of Davis' capture and the surrender of Texas, Hood surrendered to Union forces at Natchez, MS on May 31. After the war, Hood settled in New Orleans where he worked in insurance and as a cotton broker. Marrying, he fathered eleven children before his death from yellow fever on August 30, 1879. A gifted brigade and division commander, Hood's performance dropped as he was promoted to higher commands.

John Bell Hood was one of the most notorious Confederate generals of the Civil War, arguably the best division commander in the Army of Northern Virginia and also arguably the worst overall army commander of the Confederacy

John Bell Hood was one of the most notorious Confederate generals of the Civil War, arguably the best division commander in the Army of Northern Virginia and also arguably the worst overall army commander of the Confederacy. The big Texan and his brigade were crucial at Antietam, and he fought hard and was injured at Gettysburg and Chickamauga, but when he took over the Army of Tennessee in 1864, he made disastrous decisions that wrecked the army at Franklin and Nashville.

Three months after the Civil War erupted at Fort Sumter, Union military command still believed that the Confederacy could . The fighting commenced with three Union divisions crossing the Bull Run stream, and the Confederate flank was driven back to Henry House Hill.

Three months after the Civil War erupted at Fort Sumter, Union military command still believed that the Confederacy could be crushed quickly and with little loss of life.

Confederate forces under John Bell Hood desperately fought to stop William T. Sherman's advancing armies as they . Sherman's advancing armies as they tried to cut the last Confederate supply line into the city. Confederates under General Stephen D. Lee nearly overwhelmed the Union right flank, but Federals under General Oliver O. Howard decisively repelled every attack. After five hours of struggle, 5,000 Confederates lay dead and wounded, while only 632 Federals were lost. Detailing Lee's tactical missteps and Howard's vigilant leadership, he challenges many common misconceptions about the battle.

"At thirty-three years of age, Hood became the eighth and youngest of the Confederate Army's generals of full rank. He had risen through the commissioned ranks, from first lieutenant to full general, in only three years, a feat achieved by no other man during the Civil War. . . . Ultimately, Hood was selected for one reason—to fight—and no other available officer was better suited for the challenge." David Coffey's words give a succinct portrait of the ascent of John Bell Hood. His book delivers a clear and riveting evaluation of Hood's service in and command of the Western Army in Northern Georgia.The Atlanta Campaign ground on for more than four months and proved one of the most decisive of the Civil War. Cautious General Joseph Johnston was popular with the troops but, from the government's viewpoint, produced no results. Confederate President Jefferson Davis searched for a replacement with a less deliberate strategy and a more aggressive style. In short, a fighter. John Bell Hood was such a man, having led troops in battle, fighting and bleeding on behalf of the cause. He was Johnston's chief subordinate and the natural candidate as his replacement.Even so, Sherman eventually captured Atlanta and contributed to Abraham Lincoln's reelection. Hood's effort to save the railroad and manufacturing center has historically been considered a failure, with his selection as Johnston's replacement considered extremely controversial.Coffey tackles this issue, and argues for the necessity of replacing General Johnston with the most logical choice, Hood. The author also explains that, despite his scrappy reputation and aggressive style, Hood had inherited a near impossible situation in trying to save Atlanta but, according to this book, his performance was praiseworthy.

e-Books related to John Bell Hood: And the Struggle for Atlanta (Civil War Campaigns and Commanders Series)