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» » A Brief History of the Private Lives of the Roman Emperors
A Brief History of the Private Lives of the Roman Emperors e-book

Author:

Anthony Blond

Language:

English

Category:

Memoris

Subcategory:

Historical

ePub size:

1622 kb

Other formats:

lrf azw rtf docx

Rating:

4.8

Publisher:

Robinson Publishing; UK ed. edition (February 28, 2008)

Pages:

256

ISBN:

1845297199

A Brief History of the Private Lives of the Roman Emperors e-book

by Anthony Blond


If the writing is bad, the facts are worse. The title purports to cover all (or at least a good sampling) of the Roman Emperors. Instead, this book covers exactly 6 men, one of whom (Julius Caesar) was not an emperor of anything. The problems continue.

If the writing is bad, the facts are worse. Within three pages, he switches from having 5,500 men in a legion to having 6,000.

With the recent success of 'Rome' on BBC2, no one will look at the private lives of the Roman Emperors again in the . Anthony Blond was previously a publisher and an author of numerous books includingThe World of Simon Raven and his autobiography Jew Made in England.

With the recent success of 'Rome' on BBC2, no one will look at the private lives of the Roman Emperors again in the same light. Anthony Blond's scandalous expose of the life of the Caesars is a must-read for all interested in what really went on in ancient Rome.

A book on Roman Emperors. There's brief bios of the Julio-Claudian emperors inserted. This book truly feels like the author wrote down what he thought people would read, put it haphazardly into a book, and then sold it to unsuspecting readers who picked it up in a bookstore while on a trip and thought it would be interesting (like, say, m.

Its genius was its complexity and its fairness, which gained it acceptance for thirteen centuries by millions of people

Its genius was its complexity and its fairness, which gained it acceptance for thirteen centuries by millions of people. ents were finally consolidated into sixteen volumes by sixteen commissioners. In the realm of jurisprudence, Roman Law is rivalled only by the English and the First World still responds to one or other of these systems. The power of Rome grew through conquest, followed by treaties, and a process by which local gods and local laws were subsumed by Rome. Julius Caesar is usually presented as a glorious general when in fact he was an arrogant charmer and a swank; Augustus was so conscious of his height that he put lifts in his sandals. But they were nothing compared to Caligula, Claudius and Nero.

With the recent success of "Rome" on BBC2, no one will look at the private lives of the Roman Emperors again .

With the recent success of "Rome" on BBC2, no one will look at the private lives of the Roman Emperors again in the same light.

The same could not be said for its emperors . Eye-opening in its revelations and effortlessly entertaining, Anthony Blond's scandalous expose of the life of the Caesars is a must-read for all who are interested in what really went on in ancient Rome. While Shakespeare presents them as noble heroes the truth is somewhat different. This book is fascinating reading, eye-opening in its revelations and effortlessly entertaining. Anthony Blond's scandalous expose of the life of the Caesars is a must-read for all interested in what really went on in ancient Rome

With the recent success of "Rome" on BBC2, no one will look at the private lives of the Roman Emperors again in the same light.

Highlights from the series A Brief History of British Kings an attempt in part arising from the visit to the manufacturing centre of Birmingham in 1843 . A Brief History of the Private Lives of the Roman Emperors. A Brief History of Secret Societies.

Highlights from the series A Brief History of British Kings an attempt in part arising from the visit to the manufacturing centre of Birmingham in 1843 of Queen Victoria’s husband, Prince Albert. A Brief History of the Universe. A Brief History of Venice. Elizabeth Horodowich. A Brief History of the Vikings.

Anthony Blond moves away from the idea of the Roman emperors as noble rulers and instead paints a scandalous picture. The book focuses on six emperors and also devotes sections to Roman society and to the city itself.
SlingFire
I wonder what the author tried to do here. It is not a "brief live of the emperors", but some old and known excerpts taken from classic historians about the lives of just some emperors; is not even this as much mister Blond steal very cursorily from those sources and besides he looks, probably for personal reasons, more interested in Jews relations with the empire than anything else, but neither get our interest in this last thing,as much is clearly not enough what he tell about that. Then Mr. Blond, perhaps to get to something, put here and there issues associated to the empire as a whole, which is not supposed to be the goal of the book, but in this last endeavor he is even more lacking in knowledge and grace. Not is a funny book, as Mr Blond idea of humor is somewhat elemental and scarcely get a smile. If fact, it is just a VERY BAD book which I lament very much I bought elsewhere without consulting the opinion of Amazon readers. My fault....
Getaianne
I picked this book up at a local library, thinking to use it for research. I was wrong. There is nothing in this book that could not have been found in Suetonius, or, failing that, a quick Google search. Even if my intent was to read this for entertainment, I would have been severely disappointed. Mr. Blond writes like he has spent too long reading old books without knowing how the authors wrote them. Some sentences are overly long, run on sentences, sprinkled with commas and semicolons. Others are short and choppy. The author attempts to joke several times without any great success. The overall result gives the reader a headache.

If the writing is bad, the facts are worse. The title purports to cover all (or at least a good sampling) of the Roman Emperors. Instead, this book covers exactly 6 men, one of whom (Julius Caesar) was not an emperor of anything. The problems continue. Within three pages, he switches from having 5,500 men in a legion to having 6,000. He invents a new dynasty, called the Julio-Flavian; decides, apparently without any research, that the Roman circus is descended from the Greek Olympics; and on two different pages, gives the names of two different emperors that ended the Roman games. Mr. Blond has constant problems with numbers. Gaius Marius could not have possibly appointed Julius Caesar to the position of priest of the cult of Jupiter when Caesar was 19(as Mr. Blond purports) as Marius had been dead for 5 years by that point. In the year 48 BCE, Cleopatra was 21 years and her brother and husband Ptolemy XIII was 13, not 18 and 10 respectively. (I can forgive Mr. Blond for this, however, as George Bernard Shaw makes the same mistake.) What is more baffling, however, is that Mr. Blond states, contrary to all evidence, that Julius Caesar was stabbed 27 times. (It was actually 23.) All this within 50 pages!

To summarize: If I could give this book less than 1 star, I would. Do not waste time reading this. Read Suetonius if you are looking for Roman gossip about the early emperors; Martial and Juvenal if you want gossip about regular Romans. Do not bother reading this book.
Seevinev
Read this book last week on a flight to Europe. The wording is extremely difficult to follow and the organization of the chapters is so poor you will get DIZZY.
However, there are a few interesting Tid Bits in the book. Such as how Nero probably Did not start the famous Fires in Rome and other interesting accounts of the insanity of Emperor Caligula. Also it shed a little more light into the undervalued Emperor Cladius. Also good chapter on Roman and jewish relationships
Again, the wording is so poor that it almost felt like I was reading a book in a different language.
I would read this book maybe just pick a few chapters of interest and make sure you have plenty of Tylenol for head aches.
Overall a 2/5
Beazekelv
I have a fascination with Rome and its history. This is the worse book I have (almost) read on it. I only made it about half way. It is so mixed match and contradictory. It really appears as if Blond was rushed and just plugged in a bunch of quotes where he thought was necessary. His facts don't seem to match some of the others I've read. If you really want to read a good Roman History author read some of Adrian Godlsworthy's books. He is a great author on the subject.
Kifer
The author uses nested sentences almost exclusively, making it extraordinarily difficult to read this book.
The book fails dismally as an example of popular history.
Spilberg
This is not a well-written, well-researched book by a scholar or expert; it appears to be a collection of random information pulled together from miscellaneous sources by an autodidact. I'm curious how he managed to get it published. If you want juicy stories about the Roman emperors, buy a copy of Suetonius' Lives of the Caesars--it's where most of Blond's information seems to come from, anyway.
Kizshura
Blond was a publisher. He let his vanity get the better of his book sense in letting this one go to press. A good editor would have rejected it.
Impossible to read.

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