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» » EMPTY WITHOUT YOU: The Intimate Letters Of Eleanor Roosevelt And Lorena Hickok
EMPTY WITHOUT YOU: The Intimate Letters Of Eleanor Roosevelt And Lorena Hickok e-book

Author:

Roger Streitmatter

Language:

English

Category:

Memoris

Subcategory:

Historical

ePub size:

1826 kb

Other formats:

azw rtf lrf rtf

Rating:

4.3

Publisher:

Free Press; Annotated edition edition (October 9, 1998)

Pages:

336

ISBN:

0684849283

EMPTY WITHOUT YOU: The Intimate Letters Of Eleanor Roosevelt And Lorena Hickok e-book

by Roger Streitmatter


Other Books by Rodger Streitmatter Mightier than the Sword: How the News Media Have Shaped American History Unspeakable: The Rise of. .African-American Women Journalists.

Other Books by Rodger Streitmatter Mightier than the Sword: How the News Media Have Shaped American History Unspeakable: The Rise of the Gay and Lesbian Press in America. Empty Without You. THE INTIMATE LETTERS of ELEANOR ROOSEVELT and LORENA HICKOK. A Division of Simon & Schuster Inc.

In 1978, more than 3, 500 letters written over a thirty-year friendship between Eleanor Roosevelt and Lorena Hickok were discovered by archivists. Rodger Streitmatter is a professor of communications at American University. Although the most explicit letters had been burned (Lorena told Eleanor's daughter. A former reporter for the Roanoke (Virginia) Times & World News, he is the author of five previous books. He lives in Washington, .

In Empty Without You, journalist and historian Rodger Streitmatter has transcribed and annotated 300 letters that shed new light on the legendary, passionate, and intense bond between these extraordinary women. Written with the candor and introspection of a private diary, the letters expose the most private thoughts, feelings, and motivations of their authors and allow us to assess the full dimensions of a remarkable friendship.

Empty without You book. This is a very interesting compilation of some of the remaining letters between Eleanor Roosevelt and Lorena Hickok (Hick)

Empty without You book. This is a very interesting compilation of some of the remaining letters between Eleanor Roosevelt and Lorena Hickok (Hick). Although Lorena burned most of her letters, her obligation to Eleanor meant that most of Eleanor's letters have been preserved. Lorena did, however, destroy select letters from Eleanor, most likely those that revealed the most about their relationship.

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More than 300 letters chronicle a 30-year friendship between Eleanor Roosevelt and Lorena Hickok. Documents the American landscape as seen by two intelligent, influential women who loved their country, and each other, with a passion that is rare. Historian Rodger Streitmatter has transcribed and annotated more than 300 of those letters-published here for the first time-and put them within the context of the lives of these two extraordinary women, allowing us to understand the role of this remarkable friendship in Roosevelt's transformation into a crusading First Lady.

Empty Without You: The Intimate Letters Of Eleanor Roosevelt And Lorena Hickok. The Intimate Letter of Eleanor Roosevel and Lorena Hickok. Roger Streitmatter.

I cannot go to bed tonight without a word to you. I felt a little as though a part of me was leaving tonight. You have grown so much to be a part of my life that it is empty without you. Then, the following day: Hick, darling.

Earlier biographies of Eleanor Roosevelt and Lorena Hickok often include vigorous denials about the implications of these letters. It's not what it sounds like," we have been told. Streitmatter tries to let the letters speak for themselves, but perhaps he should have tried harder.

In 1978, more than 3,500 letters written over a thirty-year friendship between Eleanor Roosevelt and Lorena Hickok were .

In 1978, more than 3,500 letters written over a thirty-year friendship between Eleanor Roosevelt and Lorena Hickok were discovered by archivists.

A noted historian collects, edits, and annotates three hundred letters between First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt and Associated Press reporter Lorena Hickok, who exchanged notes for more than thirty years and developed a deep, intimate friendship clearly illustrated by their correspondence. 20,000 first printing.
Oreavi
I purchased this as a gift for my wife. She loved it and would continually make me stop what I was doing so she could tell me about something in the book. At some point, when time permits, I will read it as well.
happy light
The letter selections are wonderful. This book is essential for understanding the roles these two women played in making FDR the success he was. I did not enjoy Streitmatters assumptions of how the women felt in his commentaries between chapters. I have read other books on the subjects that directly contradict what he assumes. But aside from his opinions, the letters are a treasure.
skyjettttt
Great book. Didn't realize how much Eleanor Roosevelt was involved with policy with her husband. This woman changed the role of 1st ladies forever.
Modifyn
Without citing the necessity to comment affirmatively or negatively to Mrs. Roosevelt's sexual preferences, I applaud her passion, her candor, and her immense capability to love; in spite of all the foul balls thrown her way by those closest to her. I believe that through all of the personal drama she was obliged to endure, she still saw the cup as half full. Mr. Rodger Streitmatter upholds the dignity of the First Lady.

I must say, however, Ms. Hickok left me a little cold. I do not think their relationship could endure in this day and age, even as we seemingly embrace a more open view of bi and homosexuality. Lorena, on her emotional rollercoaster, would have been a considerable liability for anyone of Eleanor's public stature.
Doomblade
Enjoyed this book, but toward the end it became a little repetitive. Good insight into the strength and character of Eleanor Roosevelt.
Shak
This is a great an intimate read about one of my hero's. To get an inside view of love in her life and some of the workings of the White House is fun for this history nerd.
uspeh
A very powerful and beautiful portrait of the relationship between Eleanor Roosevelt and Lorena Hickock
As an avid reader of all things Roosevelt, I was rather disappointed in Rodger Streitmatter's Empty Without You: The Intimate Letters of Eleanor Roosevelt and Lorena Hickok. The story of how Eleanor and Lorena (Hick) became such intimate friends (maybe even physically intimate) is a fascinating one. Hick was a hard-nosed AP reporter who had a successful 20 year career in a profession dominated almost exclusively by men. In the course of covering FDR's first campaign, she found a kindred spirit in Eleanor. Both women were needy: they both had tough childhoods, suffered humiliations and tragedies, and were deeply wounded by those they loved. They struck up a lifelong friendship, although the intensity of this relationship waned after the first 3 years. During the course of this friendship, they wrote each other almost every day, and sometimes more than one letter in a day. Hick also lived at the White House for some of this time.
What I found so disappointing about Empty Without You is that out of the many thousands of letters that Eleanor and Hick exchanged throughout their lifetime, Hick destroyed a good many of them-especially those letters from the beginning of their relationship when it was the most intense. There are not many surprises here, and those few that allow a peak at their level of intimacy have been extensively quoted in other Roosevelt books. Also, I found that the story itself is rather depressing. Hick gave Eleanor the knowledge and power to recast the job of First Lady so that Eleanor could better achieve her own political agenda. She encouraged Eleanor to give weekly news conferences with only women reporters invited. She also prodded Eleanor to start writing newspaper columns-monthly at first, and then her daily My Day column that ran for 27 years. Finally, Hick suggested that Eleanor write her autobiography before FDR's first term was even finished. At first, Eleanor depended on Hick to help her with her writing. But Eleanor was a quick study and soon no longer needed Hick. Unfortunately, in broadening her horizons, Eleanor had less and less time for Hick. To make matters worse, Hick was forced to give up her newspaper job because of conflicts of interest, and took on a job traveling the country on behalf of FERA to report on the progress of relief programs. Hick missed the career that had brought her great success, name recognition, positive reinforcement and financial security. Hick also suffered from depression and mood swings-especially when her time with Eleanor did not go as planned. Unfortunately for Hick, her ugly and frequent outbursts were an embarrassment to Eleanor and had just the opposite effect: instead of bringing them even closer, Eleanor started to pull away. Still, Eleanor never completely abandoned Hick and did much to take care of her (especially financially) as they aged.
One thing that I did enjoy about Empty Without You are the reports that Hick wrote for FERA. Although she mostly gave snippets of these in her letters to Eleanor, boss Harry Hopkins was correct when he predicted that Hick's well-written reports would in the future become a window on the Great Depression. But overall, there is not much new or enlightening in this book. If you want to know more about the relationship between Eleanor and Lorena, I'd stick with Doris Faber's Life of Lorena Hickok: E.R.'s Friend.

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