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Eminent Victorians e-book

Author:

Lytton Strachey

Language:

English

Category:

Memoris

Subcategory:

Historical

ePub size:

1445 kb

Other formats:

mobi rtf lrf azw

Rating:

4.8

Publisher:

Kessinger Publishing, LLC (June 25, 2004)

Pages:

356

ISBN:

1417929820

Eminent Victorians e-book

by Lytton Strachey


Eminent Victorians is a book by Lytton Strachey (one of the older members of the Bloomsbury Group), first published in 1918 and consisting of biographies of four leading figures from the Victorian era. Its fame rests on the irreverence and wit Strach.

Eminent Victorians is a book by Lytton Strachey (one of the older members of the Bloomsbury Group), first published in 1918 and consisting of biographies of four leading figures from the Victorian era. Its fame rests on the irreverence and wit Strachey brought to bear on three men and a woman who had until then been regarded as heroes: Cardinal Manning, Florence Nightingale, Thomas Arnold and General Gordon (although Nightingale is actually praised and her reputation was enhanced).

by. Strachey, Lytton, 1880-1932.

Eminent Victorians book. Lytton Strachey's biographical essays on four "eminent Victorians" dropped an explosive charge on Victorian England when the book was published in 1918

Eminent Victorians book. Lytton Strachey's biographical essays on four "eminent Victorians" dropped an explosive charge on Victorian England when the book was published in 1918.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Lytton Strachey was a British author and critic

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Lytton Strachey was a British author and critic. On top of writing widely read books such as Eminent Victorians and his biography on Queen Victoria.

You can read Eminent Victorians by Strachey, Lytton, 1880-1932 in our library for absolutely free. Read various fiction books with us in our e-reader.

Strachey's next work, Eminent Victorians (1918), caused a succès de scandale, establishing him as a leader of the reaction against the Victorians that followed World War I. "Lytton Strachey's chief mission. was to take down once and for all the pretensions of the Victorian Age to moral superiority," noted Edmund Wilson. In Eminent Victorians he stripped forever of their solemn upholstery the religion, the education, the statesmanship and the philanthropy of the society which had brought it about.

Lytton Strachey's biographical essays on four "eminent Victorians" dropped an explosive charge on Victorian England when the book was published in 1918

Lytton Strachey's biographical essays on four "eminent Victorians" dropped an explosive charge on Victorian England when the book was published in 1918. It ushered in the modern biography and raised the genre to the level of high literary art. Strachey approached his subjects with skepticism rather than reverence, and his iconoclastic wit and engaging narratives thrilled as well as shocked his contemporaries. Eminent Victorians is a groundbreaking work of biography that raised the genre to the level of high art. It replaced reverence with skepticism and Strachey's wit, iconoclasm, and narrative skill liberated the biographical enterprise.

Eminently wicked biographies. Published by Thriftbooks. com User, 14 years ago. (Giles) Lytton Strachey (1880-1932) introduced psychological depth to biographical writing, thereby forever changing the biography. Strachey "revolutionized the art of biography," E. M. Forster observed, by doing what no biographer had ever done before. He managed to get inside his subject's head.

Strachey Lytton Eminent Victorians. THE history of the Victorian Age will never be written; we know too much about it. For ignorance is the first requisite of the historian-ignorance, which simplifies and clarifies, which selects and omits, with a placid perfection unattainable by the highest art. Concerning the Age which has just passed, our fathers and our grandfathers have poured forth and accumulated so vast a quantity of information that the industry of a Ranke would be submerged by it, and the perspicacity of a Gibbon would quail before it.

Lytton Strachey (1880–1932). Florence Nightingale. But it rose before her, that instinct, arrayed-how could it be otherwise?-in the inevitable habiliments of a Victorian marriage; and she had the strength to stamp it underfoot. I have an intellectual nature which requires satisfaction, and that would find it in him. I have a passional nature which requires satisfaction, and that would find it in him.

This scarce antiquarian book is a facsimile reprint of the original. Due to its age, it may contain imperfections such as marks, notations, marginalia and flawed pages. Because we believe this work is culturally important, we have made it available as part of our commitment for protecting, preserving, and promoting the world's literature in affordable, high quality, modern editions that are true to the original work.
Sha
Consider the book, Eminent Victorians by Lytton Strachey. A book with that title by an author with that name seems fated to die on a doily in a dark parlor. Or so I thought before I swallowed hard and read it. Turned out to be a lively, trenchant treasure.

All four subjects of this book are out-sized. Henry Manning, switching from the Church of England to the Church of Rome, became a cardinal in the bargain and a central figure in British church and state affairs. "The Lady of the Lamp" Florence Nightingale, the heroine of the Crimea, founded modern nursing. A driven hyper-critic in an angel suit, she crusaded for hospital reform while hovering "near death" for the fifty years following the Light Brigade's charge. Thomas Arnold, headmaster at Rugby, triggered change in the British public school system, putting intellect third behind good conduct and religious principle. General Gordon, was an intense and eccentric polymath hero in China but eventually a victim of Sudanese violence and British politics.

Strachey's four portraits show able, strong and willful people all astringently sure of themselves and, to varying degrees, mentally mis-calibrated. Alongside them, he delivers vivid cameos of Victorians ranging from Newman to Gladstone to Victoria herself, each with mental dents and bendings of their own.

Common to all the principal figures is a personal struggle on behalf of, with, against, or about, God. Of course, if there is no God, the struggles were a waste of time. And if there IS a God, the struggles were no less a waste since the principals could never do better than finish an infinitely distant second. Strachey never actually says exactly that. But the agonies over God drift through his book like mist through muslin.

This is a very fine work, a full purse of polished prose expressed with the cadence of hymns, the force of surprise, and the occasional bite of an adder. ("The great bulk of the clergy walked calmly along the smooth road of ordinary duty.") Sadly, the fine writing is poorly served by a clumsy publisher. To site only the most visible faux pas among scores of them, the back cover includes the statement that the book "was first published in 1818." No doubt this would have come as surprising news to Lytton Strachey who was not born until 1880.
Butius
The book itself is a classic of cultural history, and well as a landmark in the history of biography. Our modern up-close-and-personal psychology-from-a distance with juicy tidbits style of biography started with this book. Of course, Strachey, of Bloomsbury Group fame, was quite a character.

The EDITION, however, is wretched. This is one of those we-print-one-when-you-order-it numbers. It is loaded with obvious typo errors, sometimes several on a page. Also zero context-setting editor's introduction or afterword. Much better to get the Penguin, or whatever, and have a professional job of it.
Clever
Although it sometimes comes at the expense of clarity, there is some artful writing here. Some examples:

On public school education:
"A system of anarchy tempered by despotism. A life in which licensed barbarism was mingled with the daily and hourly study of the niceties of Ovidian verse."

On Monsignor Talbot:
He could apply flattery with so unsparing a hand that even princes of the church found it sufficient."

On Dr. Hall:
"A rough terrier of a man who had worried his way to the top of his profession."

On Cardinal Newman:
"With a sinking heart, he realized at last the painful truth: it was not the nature of his views, it was his having views at all that was objectionable."

If it is sardonic wit you want, you will find it here, in these four essays. Whether you will find these particular Victorians interesting is another matter. General Gordon, Florence Nightingale, Dr. Thomas Arnold, and Cardinal Manning are not as relevant today as they once were. But these psychologically penetrating essays created quite a stir in their time, and even changed the course of the art of biography.

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