ComicsChildrenHumorFitnessReferenceITLawCookingHobbiesTeachingSelf-HelpPhotoFantasyHistoryTestsCalendarsFictionLGBTTeenagersTransportMemorisMedicineMysteryRelationshipsPoliticsBusinessSpiritualityRomanceBiblesMathSportTravelOtherNo category
» » The Man Who Would Be Perfect: John Humphrey Noyes and the Utopian Impulse
The Man Who Would Be Perfect: John Humphrey Noyes and the Utopian Impulse e-book

Author:

Robert David Thomas

Language:

English

Category:

Memoris

Subcategory:

Historical

ePub size:

1616 kb

Other formats:

lrf rtf lit doc

Rating:

4.2

Publisher:

University of Pennsylvania Press; Reprint 2016 ed. edition (May 1, 1977)

Pages:

216

ISBN:

0812277244

The Man Who Would Be Perfect: John Humphrey Noyes and the Utopian Impulse e-book

by Robert David Thomas


Start by marking The Man Who Would Be Perfect: John .

Start by marking The Man Who Would Be Perfect: John Humphrey Noyes and the Utopian Impulse as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Read by Robert David Thomas. Yet he has also been called a "Vermont Casanova" whose elaborate theology John Humphrey Noyes, founder of utopian communities in Putney, Vermont, and Oneida, New York, remain one of the most enigmatic reformers of the nineteenth century. The last biography, written over forty years ago, portrayed Noyes as a "Yankee Saint," a man of progressive ideas and religious vision.

Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1977. xii + 199 pp. Illustration, notes, bibliography, and index. }, author {Raymond Lee Muncy}, journal {The Journal of American History}, year {1978}, volume {65}, pages {190-191} }. Raymond Lee Muncy.

The Man Who Would Be Perfect: John Humphrey Noyes and the Utopian Impulse. by Robert David Thomas. Indiana Magazine of History.

University of Pennsylvania Press/1977. Thomas, Robert, 1939-The man who would be p e r f e c t. Bibliography: p. Includes index. 1. lioyes, John Humphrey, l 3 l l - l 8 8 6. 2. Oneida. 3. S o c i a l reformers-United S t a t e s

Who would you like to send this to? Optional message. CAPTCHA . Skip to the audio challenge. Views captured on Cambridge Core between

Who would you like to send this to? Optional message. Full text views reflects the number of PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views. Usage data cannot currently be displayed.

Robert David Thomas, The Man Who Would Be Perfect: John Humphrey Noyes and the Utopian Impulse. Philadelphia, PA: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1977. Benjamin B. Warfield, "John Humphrey Noyes and his 'Bible Communists,'" Bibliotheca Sacra, vol. 78, whole no. 309 (Jan. 1921), pp. 37–72. John Humphrey Noyes: The Oneida Community.

Robert David Thomas was educated at Kenyon College (. Case Western Reserve University (. He is the author of The Man Who Would Be Perfect: John Humphrey Noyes and the Utopian Impulse (1977). and the State University of New York at Stony Brook (P. and was trained at the Cleveland Psychoanalytic Institute. Since 1974 he has taught at University School in Hunting Valley, Ohio.

John Humphrey Noyes and the Utopian impulse. Published 1977 by University of Pennsylvania Press in . Written in English. Internet Archive Wishlist, Social reformers, Biography, Oneida Community. John Humphrey Noyes (1811-1886). 177-194. Glaser has frequently acknowledged the influence of both Paul F. Lazarsfeld and Robert Merton on his conceptual ideation of GT. By ThomasRobert David. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1977. Hans Zetterberg, Herbert Hyman, Alvin Gouldner, David Reisman, Daniel Bell, and Edward Shils.

81 Robert David Thomas, The Man Who Would Be Perfect: John Humphrey Noyes and the Utopian Impulse (Philadelphia, The University of Pennsylvania Press, 1977), p. 88. 82 Randall Hillebrand, The Oneida Community, New York History Net. 83 George Bancrof. 83 George Bancrof, History of the United States (Boston: Little, Brown and C. 1868). 84 Tyler, p. 48. 85 Claudine L. Farrell, The Abolitionist Movement (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 2006). 86 Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-’64 (Chicago: O. D. Case & C. 1864), 1: 122.

John Humphrey Noyes, founder of utopian communities in Putney, Vermont, and Oneida, New York, remain one of the most enigmatic reformers of the nineteenth century. The last biography, written over forty years ago, portrayed Noyes as a "Yankee Saint," a man of progressive ideas and religious vision. Yet he has also been called a "Vermont Casanova" whose elaborate theology of Perfection is simply justified the license he took with the women in his communities.

Robert David Thomas makes a convincing case that Noyes, though riven by conflict and full of contradictions, had his finger on the social and cultural problems that were bothering a great many Americans of his time. Studied out of context, Noyes must remain a mystery-radical yet conservative, shy yet arrogant, retiring, and passive yet forceful, even oppressive, in his leadership. But against the background of nineteenth-century American activism and religious enthusiasm, John Humphrey Noyes emerges as a man who overcame a tortured personal life and marshaled his inner resources to grapple with a confusing and rapidly changing social world.

Using modern theories of the ego, Thomas provides a psychologically consistent portrait of Noyes and therein a new perspective on the roots of nineteenth-century Perfectionism, utopian, reform, sexual ideology, and family theory. More than a conventional psycho-biography, this study assumes a sociological theme in its explanations of the social tensions of the era and the sources of "disorder" now so frequently mentioned in studies of the previous century.


e-Books related to The Man Who Would Be Perfect: John Humphrey Noyes and the Utopian Impulse