ComicsChildrenHumorFitnessReferenceITLawCookingHobbiesTeachingSelf-HelpPhotoFantasyHistoryTestsCalendarsFictionLGBTTeenagersTransportMemorisMedicineMysteryRelationshipsPoliticsBusinessSpiritualityRomanceBiblesMathSportTravelOtherNo category
» » Family, Sex and Marriage in England, 1500-1800, Abridged edition
Family, Sex and Marriage in England, 1500-1800, Abridged edition e-book

Author:

Lawrence Stone

Language:

English

Category:

Memoris

Subcategory:

Arts & Literature

ePub size:

1136 kb

Other formats:

lrf lrf mbr txt

Rating:

4.4

Publisher:

Harper & Row; Abridged edition (February 1, 1980)

Pages:

446

ISBN:

0060907355

Family, Sex and Marriage in England, 1500-1800, Abridged edition e-book

by Lawrence Stone


When Lawrence Stone first published this book in the late 1970s, it was unprecedented. His book goes back through the history of society in regards of family, sex and marriage to show how it changed in perspective and purpose.

When Lawrence Stone first published this book in the late 1970s, it was unprecedented. By meticulously combing through thousands of documents, Stone appeared to have reconstructed the personal relationships and family structures of an age long gone. But that was 35 years ago, and historians have had lots of time to examine his more radical ideas, such as the notion that early modern families were cold and unconnected. The society of 16th century England was very different from that of 19th century England.

Start by marking Family, Sex and Marriage in England 1500-1800 (Abridged, no footnotes) as. .Lawrence Stone was an English historian of early modern Britain. He is noted for his work on the English Civil War and marriage

Start by marking Family, Sex and Marriage in England 1500-1800 (Abridged, no footnotes) as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. He is noted for his work on the English Civil War and marriage. Stone was a major advocate of using the methods of the social sciences to study history. Books by Lawrence Stone

Published 1977 by Weidenfeld & Nicolson in London. Bibliography: p. -781.

Published 1977 by Weidenfeld & Nicolson in London. History, Family, Social life and customs, Marriage, Sex customs, Sources, Social conditions, Manners and customs, Families.

Many of the books in our Antiquarian Rare Collectable category have been photographed by our team. Family, Sex and Marriage in England, 1500-1800 by Lawrence Stone (Paperback, 1979). Pre-owned: lowest price.

Portraits of Medieval Women: Family, Marriage, and Politics in England 1225-1350. Volume 36 Issue 3 - Henrietta Leyser.

448 Seiten Medienartikel von Book Broker Berlin sind stets in gebrauchsfähigem ordentlichen Zustand

Lawrence Stone was educated at Charterhouse School and Christ Church, Oxford. He was a lecturer at University College, Oxford, from 1947 to 1950, and a Fellow of Wadham College, Oxford, from 1950 to 1963. Since 1963 be has been Dodge Professor of History at Princeton University, and Director of the Shelby Cullom Davis Center for Historical Studies, also at Princeton, since 1969. Professor Stone has contributed numerous articles to learned journals and periodicals. 448 Seiten Medienartikel von Book Broker Berlin sind stets in gebrauchsfähigem ordentlichen Zustand. Dieser Artikel weist folgende Merkmale auf: Helle/saubere Seiten in fester Bindung.

In The Family, Sex and Marriage in England, 1500-1800 (1977) Stone used quantitative methods to study family life. The book was very well received

In The Family, Sex and Marriage in England, 1500-1800 (1977) Stone used quantitative methods to study family life. The book was very well received. Writing in the Times Literary Supplement, Keith Thomas described it as "easily Professor Stone's most ambitious book yet, even though it comes from the pen of a historian who has by now produced some 3,000 pages in hard covers

PART FOUR The Closed Domesticated Nuclear Family 1640-1800.

PART FOUR The Closed Domesticated Nuclear Family 1640-1800. CHAPTER 6 The Growth of Affective Individualism (page 221).

Now, also recall the following slide, that was placed several in front of the supplemental slide point in lecture 13. The take home message here is that the facts from the 1500- 1800 about low birth rates and very high mortality rates with poverty and high density have not obtained (are no longer true) since about 1950 for humans. What changed then? Haber Bosch N, fossil fuel contributions to huge global food production, the Green Revoluttion, and distribution of charity food to areas of famine

This book studies the evolution of the family from the sixteenth to the eighteenth century and how the process . Published by Thriftbooks. com User, 11 years ago. "The Family, Sex and Marriage in England 1500 - 1800" by Lawrence Stone This is a truly unusual book.

This book studies the evolution of the family from the sixteenth to the eighteenth century and how the process radically influenced child-rearing, education, contraception, sexual behaviour and marriage. It is a history book, but it's subject matter is interesting, of course, but handled very well and scholarly. Mr. Stone does us all a service in studying and presenting this subject in this fashion.

This book studies the evolution of the family from the sixteenth to the eighteenth century and how the process radically influenced child-rearing, education, contraception, sexual behaviour and marriage.
Rivik
For anyone interested in how the 'modern' family came to be, this is simply a must-read book. The level of detail and excellent material here give insights so often lost in historical study into the reasons why certain family norms are norms, and how families in earlier times might view those norms as completely not normal at all. The book even tries to touch a little bit on the later Victorian family, though the main focus is really on the 16th to 18th centuries. It's a longer read, but well worth the time.
Ddilonyne
When Lawrence Stone first published this book in the late 1970s, it was unprecedented. By meticulously combing through thousands of documents, Stone appeared to have reconstructed the personal relationships and family structures of an age long gone. But that was 35 years ago, and historians have had lots of time to examine his more radical ideas, such as the notion that early modern families were cold and unconnected. Stone himself retreated from some of his theses after they were shown to be overstated or incorrect. A sampling of the current status of the debate over this book can be found at:
[...]

Given that, it's hard to know how much to lean on this book. Certainly, the details and anecdotes are excellent. Who knew that the English bussed each other on the lips when they greeted each other, at a time when the rest of Europe was more reticent? But this volume should be handled with care. It is in some ways a historical document of its own, redolent with the unmistakable scent of the turbulent 1970s.
Anarahuginn
I difficult subject to research as data is limited, and conclusions are consequently loose. Nevertheless an enjoyable read that challenged peoples' views of certainly the 1500-1700 era. The structure of the family and the early departure of children gave food for thought, as did the impact of very high death rates on the stability of the family.
Ucantia
When it said abridged I didn't realize half of the book had been removed.
Rigiot
This book was in excellent condition for a used book. It came in plenty of time, and I have no complaints.
Umdwyn
Although dated and out of print, this book is phenomenal and stone captivates the essence of the family scene from the 16th-19th century.
Kirizan
"The Family, Sex and Marriage in England 1500 - 1800" by Lawrence Stone
This is a truly unusual book. It is a history book, but it's subject matter is interesting, of course, but handled very well and scholarly. Mr. Stone does us all a service in studying and presenting this subject in this fashion. His book goes back through the history of society in regards of family, sex and marriage to show how it changed in perspective and purpose. The society of 16th century England was very different from that of 19th century England. The main differences were in purposes and roles people played within their society: for instance, at the beginning of the history, children were disposable; at the end of the history, they were loved and coddled.
The extraordinary amount of change in those three centuries is what is so amazing. We do not think that there has been a time that was very unlike our own in the raising of children, and yet, from the one example above, there has been a sea change in how children are treated and raised. The same can be said for relations between husband and wife, servant and lord, merchant and customer, etc. We just do not realize the change in values and society. It is probably because of the slowness, or the subtleness, of those changes.
There are some books that have come out in the last ten years or so about the homosexual relations some of the people had through the Middle Ages on until the middle 1800's. Now I wonder if the changes in societies attitude towards homosexuals has been as gradual and subtle so that we do not even remember the alternative was prevalent not too long ago?
Abolish the family! That was a slogan that resonated among those of us of the "Generation of "68" radical and counterculture movements of the 1960's as we rebelled, justifiably so, against the straitjacket of the bourgeois nuclear family structures that we grew up in. Or, as was additionally true in the case of women (and not only women in the end) the struggle against the extra burdens imposed by the dominant male role models that women were seemingly forced to put up with (including in the radical movements). Well, since that time there have been some changes in the nuclear family structure; some dramatic as with the increased role outside the home for women in education, employment and political life and some changes that glaringly reveal the same old straitjacket of women's continuing dominant role in childcare and domestic duties. In short, in its essentials the bourgeois nuclear family structure has, more or less, survived the onslaught of the 1960's.

Although we are wiser now in our understanding that abolishing the family by proclamation was utopian nevertheless the need to replace that structure continues today. For those who argue that even that premise is utopian (if just plain not desirable) then Professor Lawrence Stone's little treatise (well not so little, abridged it still comes to over 400 pages. One can only wonder what the full volume of over 800 pages entailed.) on the evolution of English family life between 1500 and 1800 (with a fair amount of carry over to America) does a great deal to demonstrate that even this seemingly eternal bourgeois nuclear family structure had made dramatic changes over time. As always with older books reviewed here use the material with the understanding that, particularly in this field with the tremendous rises in women's studies since the 1970's, that this is a place to start not finish.

Obviously, for those who are the least bit familiar with the historic rise of capitalism, particularly England's vanguard role in that rise the period under discussion in Professor Stone's book, is something of a primer for the changes in English society that would drive the industrial revolution of the later part of this period. Stone thus spends some worthwhile time on the decline of the old agrarian, almost feudal, family networks based on kinship and clientage that dominated in the early period, how these arrangements were undermined by the rise of the state, the rise of cities and the capitalization of agriculture. These are therefore the predicates to creating a national market in commodities, and in their wake family relationships.

No study of England in the period that includes the English revolution of the mid-17th century can ignore the importance to changes in family life and sexual mores that the temporary victory of what we call Puritanism brought with it. In many ways the Puritans, or at least their ethos, were the vanguard of the bourgeois nuclear family as we know it today. Consecrating on the individual biological family, the partnership of husband and wife and changes in attitudes toward child rearing are all given serious consideration by Stone. And as the professor repeatedly noted, many of the social mores developed during the flow and ebb of the whole revolutionary period survived the restoration.

In support of his general themes Professor Stone, after laying out the above-mentioned causes for the decline of the old fashioned patriarchal society (and the survival of vestiges of it well into the end of this period) and the rise of the more efficient nuclear family the evolved in the wake of the English revolution, goes into very specific details about some changes in this family structure. He covers such topics as changes in mating arrangements and ritual; the rise of individual choice in marriage outside the traditional parental arrangements; increased opportunities for women outside the home; more permissiveness in child rearing; and, with the increased possibilities of survival beyond childhood due to better economic circumstances and medical knowledge, closer affectionate relationships between the generations.

Professor Stone tops off his work with some very interesting tidbits about the sexual mores of the times using two old familiar characters from this period of English history, Samuel Pepys (17th century) and Samuel Johnson's biographer James Boswell (18th century) as his foils. The sexual exploits of these guys should make us all blush, right? But here is the `skinny' on the importance of Professor Stone's book. The next time someone tells you the family has always been and always will be as it is. Or worst, that it is the fighting unit for social change tell them the story is a little more complicated than that. And point them to this book.

e-Books related to Family, Sex and Marriage in England, 1500-1800, Abridged edition