ComicsChildrenHumorFitnessReferenceITLawCookingHobbiesTeachingSelf-HelpPhotoFantasyHistoryTestsCalendarsFictionLGBTTeenagersTransportMemorisMedicineMysteryRelationshipsPoliticsBusinessSpiritualityRomanceBiblesMathSportTravelOtherNo category
» » The Road Washes Out in Spring: A Poet’s Memoir of Living Off the Grid
The Road Washes Out in Spring: A Poet’s Memoir of Living Off the Grid e-book

Author:

Baron Wormser

Language:

English

Category:

Memoris

Subcategory:

Arts & Literature

ePub size:

1282 kb

Other formats:

txt doc azw lrf

Rating:

4.5

Publisher:

University Press of New England; First Edition edition (October 31, 2006)

Pages:

199

ISBN:

1584656077

The Road Washes Out in Spring: A Poet’s Memoir of Living Off the Grid e-book

by Baron Wormser


Interesting treatise on Wormser's life living off-grid in a house in the woods in a little town way up in Maine with his wife and children.

Interesting treatise on Wormser's life living off-grid in a house in the woods in a little town way up in Maine with his wife and children. As much as he enthused about really not minding the endless chopping of wood and tried to make going to the outhouse in the middle of a winter night sound alluring, he was honest enough that I had no interest in living that life, though I would have loved to have stopped by for a visit

Scattered Chapters: New and Selected Poems, Sarabande Books, 2008. The Road Washes Out in Spring: A Poet's Memoir of Living Off the Grid UPNE, 2006.

Scattered Chapters: New and Selected Poems, Sarabande Books, 2008. Carthage Illuminated Sea Press, 2005. Subject Matter Sarabande Books, 2004. Teaching the Art of Poetry: The Moves, co-author David Cappella, Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 2000.

For nearly twenty-five years, poet Baron Wormser and his family lived in a house in Maine with no electricity or. .

For nearly twenty-five years, poet Baron Wormser and his family lived in a house in Maine with no electricity or running water. They grew much of their own food, carried water by hand, and read by the light of kerosene lamps.

A beautifully written memoir of nature, community, and poetry. For nearly twenty-five years, poet Baron Wormser and his family lived in a house in Maine with no electricity or running water. They considered themselves part of the back to the land movement, but their choice to live off the grid was neither statement nor protest: they simply had built their house too far from the road and could not afford to bring in power lines.

Baron Wormser is a poet and and teacher, and a fiction and nonfiction writer. He gives workshops on writing and on teaching poetry, and readings all over the world. I am thinking of a windless, steady plummeting. Nothing is moving except for snowflakes. You can hear the snow faintly ticking on the pine needle branches. You can hear it descending-a soft sift of air.

Contemporary Maine poet Baron Wormser has now published a book that re-approaches the concerns of Walden not in.This is surely a poet’s book.

Contemporary Maine poet Baron Wormser has now published a book that re-approaches the concerns of Walden not in a scholarly fashion but firsthand, testing and weighing the immediate and practical utility of a life in the woods and addressing Thoreau not as a lofty intellectual forebear but as mentor and even peer. While not a memoir really, as the term is mostly used today, Wormser’s book is also not a how-to manual. His vocabulary can be delightfully erudite and still entirely natural sounding, and his prose is muscular yet always conversational, loping in gait while assiduously probing.

Wormser and Cappella, however, understand the plight of overburdened teachers; those who have little time for reading may skim the . The Road Washes Out in Spring: A Poet’s Memoir of Living Off the Grid Paperback.

Wormser and Cappella, however, understand the plight of overburdened teachers; those who have little time for reading may skim the essay and skip to each chapter's classroom exercises, lesson plans and bibliography. The potential is exponential.

This listing is for The Road Washes Out in Spring : A Poet's Memoir of Living off the Grid by Baron Wormser (2008, Paperback) : Baron Wormser (2008) . This listing is for The Road Washes Out in Spring : A Poet's Memoir of Living off the Grid by Baron Wormser (2008, Paperback) : Baron Wormser (2008) ISBN 9781584657040: All previously owned books are guaranteed to be in good condition.

Baron Wormser - Born in Baltimore, Maryland, on February 4, 1948, Baron .

Baron Wormser - Born in Baltimore, Maryland, on February 4, 1948, Baron Wormser grew up in Baltimore, where he attended high school at Baltimore. books of prose, including the novel Teach Us That Peace (Piscataqua Press, 2013), the short story collection The Poetry Life (CavanKerry Press, 2008), and a memoir, The Road Washes Out in Spring (University Press of New England, 2006).

Baron Wormser was born in Baltimore, Maryland

Baron Wormser was born in Baltimore, Maryland. He earned his BA from Johns Hopkins University and did graduate work at the University of California-Irvine and the University of Maine. His works of prose include the novel Teach Us That Peace (2013), the short story collection The Poetry Life: Ten Stories (2008), and a memoir of the years he and his family spent living off the grid in Maine, The Road Washes Out in Spring: A Poet’s Memoir of Living off the Grid (2006).

For nearly twenty-five years, poet Baron Wormser and his family lived in a house in Maine with no electricity or running water. They grew much of their own food, carried water by hand, and read by the light of kerosene lamps. They considered themselves part of the "back to the land" movement, but their choice to live off the grid was neither statement nor protest: they simply had built their house too far from the road and could not afford to bring in power lines. Over the years, they settled in to a life that centered on what Thoreau called "the essential facts."In this graceful meditation, Wormser similarly spurns ideology in favor of observation, exploration, and reflection. "When we look for one thread of motive," he writes, "we are, in all likelihood, deceiving ourselves." His refusal to be satisfied with the obvious explanation, the single thread of motive, makes him a keen and sympathetic observer of his neighbors and community, a perceptive reader of poetry and literature, and an honest and unselfconscious analyst of his own responses to the natural world. The result is a series of candid personal essays on community and isolation, nature, civilization, and poetry.
Kage
I hope everyone reads this book. It is charmingly written and a worthwhile read from the recent former poet laureate of Maine. His story motivates us all with its straighforward nature. Thank you, Baron Wormser and book seller.
Steelcaster
I thought this was a very hard read, author kept veering off the subject matter and writing page after page about something else i.e. poetry, trees, etc. I was hoping to read about everyday life in the backwoods of Maine and the hardships as well as the rewards of doing so. The title info was sparce and rare throughout the book. Too many long complicated unfamiliar words, Very disapointing.
Kizshura
In the old and idiosyncratic genre of wilderness literature, our American masterpiece is Thoreau's Walden: Or, Life in the Woods.

As with many perennially great books, when people overcome its daunting aura of "edifice" to actually read Walden, they often find the experience fabulously enjoyable. Thoreau combined exceptional poetic resourcefulness with astute political convictions and a seasoned gift for precise ecological detail. His writing also pulses with wit and resonant metaphor.

Contemporary Maine poet Baron Wormser has now published a book that re-approaches the concerns of Walden not in a scholarly fashion but first-hand, testing and weighing the immediate and practical utility of a life in the woods and addressing Thoreau not as a lofty intellectual forebear but as mentor and even peer.

While not a "memoir" really, as the term is mostly used today, Wormser's book is also not a how-to manual. The Road Washes Out in Spring is a marvelously sensual evocation of the motives and means of one family who took Thoreau's challenge to heart and spent a couple of decades living at the end of the road, foregoing conveniences such as electricity and harvesting much of their own food and fuel from the land right at hand.

Like the ancient Chinese sages Li Po and Wang Wei in intentional exile from the metropolis, Thoreau turned away from "normal" career and family expectations to perch at the margin of his society, from there turning back to scrutinize, contemplate, and speculate. Not "retreating" but shifting vantage points, the poet-exile seeks to see worldly reality and possibility with a fresh acuity impossible amid the mercantile hubbub and courtly intrigues of the city.

Wormser's book has three themes, entwined -- the nature of homesteading, in an era of commodity housing and "real" estate; the nature of poetry, at a time when a poet's age-old vocation as chronicling bard and shaman seems effaced by self-help frenzies and obsession with celebrities; and the nature of spiritual discipline, where the other two themes are combined, and where the joys and challenges of disciplined meditation are explored as manifestations of home-making and poetic artistry.

Characteristically, Wormser torques the "back-to-the-land" cliché -- and the perplexity of urban or suburban relations and friends -- by describing his family's Maine home not as in the middle of nowhere but "in the middle of Elsewhere." This is surely a poet's book. His vocabulary can be delightfully erudite and still entirely natural-sounding, and his prose is muscular yet always conversational, loping in gait while assiduously probing. He writes with special alacrity of neighbors, woodstoves, splitting mauls, outhouses, and the vagaries of weather across the day and night sky.

On the original title page of Walden the author declaimed, "I do not propose to write an ode to dejection, but to brag as lustily as chanticleer in the morning, standing on his roost, if only to wake my neighbors up."

In tone and tempo, Wormser is more akin to owl than rooster. With less bravado and ferocity than Thoreau, but with comparable subtlety and ardor, Baron Wormser has written a beautiful and eloquent reprise to Walden, entirely contemporary and likely to powerfully beguile readers who live in the north woods but also those who decidedly do not, like a friend of mine -- a poet and professional exterminator from Jersey City -- who told me that The Road Washes Out in Spring is the best book he's read in years.
Zugar
This is a great book. Not a how to at all (better than any how-to book on the subject I have read though, a motivating account of how-did), but a thoughtful collection of reflections about family life, rural off the grid living, poetry, country neighbors and the nearby small rural town's life. A litle 70's and 80's era stemming from back-to-the-land out of the sixties style versus "modern" cob/strawbale, solar, energy efficiency, etc sustainability, but shows how simple it can be, how enjoyable too and really just encourages you to go do it. The refelctions on their local nature and our modern culture are timeless and pertinent. The topics cover city hippies getting helped out building the house, the virtues of an outhouse and no electricity, rural small town economy, stoic resourceful rural neighbors, national politics, wells/water supply, and of course their exciting driveway. A really fabulous book, I highly recommend it.
CONVERSE
Wormser is a sage, playful, exacting, pure writer, and this book is an absolute treat. The structure is wonderfully unconventional--his thoughts glide from one focused argument or narrative to the next like a bird moving from branch to branch in the woods. Looking forward to reading more prose (and poetry) from this author.
Cha
Wonderfully crafted language. A polished gem. Resonance.

Few books, in recent years, have made me cry.

This one did.
Jare
The Road Washes Out in Spring, subtitled, "A Poet's Memoir of Living off the Grid," is half memoir of life lived in near isolation up north in the Maine woods and half reflection from an evolving poet on his métier. The poet might have told his readers from the outset that the setting, for those of us big onsetting or location, is the environs between Mercer where he lived and Norridgewock, Maine, along US Route 2.

That Baron Wormser, from a hippy culture, chose to go to the woods with his family at the time that he did is a good story, the one that I wanted to read about. For some, the reflective writing on the poet, the poets and poetry, will be of equal interest to the basic narrative; for me, it soon became a disappointing obstacle.

As one reads, one may fairly wonder, did the author's wife and children settle in to enjoy their stay in the woods with nineteenth century basics, or did life pass them by? Some will argue it was his victory, others will say it was most probably a team effort. My reading leaves me wondering. I missed those parts of the memoir left out.
The book is like brand new, but with a really good price, I love it. I will definitely buy again.

e-Books related to The Road Washes Out in Spring: A Poet’s Memoir of Living Off the Grid