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» » Notes on Nursing: What It Is and What It Is Not (Custom Imprint Edition)
Notes on Nursing: What It Is and What It Is Not (Custom Imprint Edition) e-book

Author:

Florence Nightingale

Language:

English

Category:

Medicine

Subcategory:

Nursing

ePub size:

1673 kb

Other formats:

lrf rtf lrf txt

Rating:

4.2

Publisher:

Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; 1 edition (January 30, 1999)

ISBN:

0781720338

Notes on Nursing: What It Is and What It Is Not (Custom Imprint Edition) e-book

by Florence Nightingale


Notes on Nursing: What it is and What it is Not is a book first published by Florence Nightingale in 1859.

Notes on Nursing: What it is and What it is Not is a book first published by Florence Nightingale in 1859. A 76-page volume with 3 page appendix published by Harrison of Pall Mall, it was intended to give hints on nursing to those entrusted with the health of others. Florence Nightingale stressed that it was not meant to be a comprehensive guide from which to teach one's self to be a nurse but to help in the practice of treating others.

Elmer Belt Florence Nightingale collection

This facsimile has been reproduced from the copy in the Rare Book Room of the Library of Congress. -"The story of this reprint", . .Facsimile reprint of the 1st e. published in 1859 by Harrison, London. The following notes are by no means intended as a rule of thought by which nurses can teach themselves to nurse, still less as a manual to teach nurses to nurse. Elmer Belt Florence Nightingale collection. Publisher's light brown cloth over boards, stamped in blind and gold.

Florence Nightingale was the founder of the modern nursing profession. Without Florence Nightingale nursing would not be the respected profession it is today. I referenced this book several times when writing papers for my BSN and MSN. She single handedly revolutionized medical treatment with her writings on nursing. Miss Nightingale was also a statistician whose work is still recognized today.

Without Florence Nightingale nursing would not be the respected profession it is today. As a Registered Nurse for over 26 years, I have never read this work before. It was free on Kindle and came highly recommended. What a wonderful glimpse of the foundations of nursing. Although it can be viewed as a historical text, it also is fine contemporary reading.

Notes on Nursing book. There is no doubht that nursing would not be what it is today with out Florence Nightingale, but this book was so preachy and nagging

Notes on Nursing book. There is no doubht that nursing would not be what it is today with out Florence Nightingale, but this book was so preachy and nagging. I will definately save it as a citation source for later work, but not something you want to read again or ever. Every nurse should read this to remind us where nursing has been, how far we've come and what has not changed at all!

What it is, and what it is not. By florence nightingale

What it is, and what it is not. By florence nightingale. New York D. Appleton and Company 1860. Notes on nursing: What IT is and what IT is not. SHALL we begin by taking it as a general principle–that all disease, at some period or other of its course, is more or less a reparative process, not necessarily accompanied with suffering: an effort of nature to remedy a process of poisoning or of decay, which has taken place weeks, months, sometimes years beforehand, unnoticed, the termination of the disease being then

Notes on Nursing - Florence Nightingale.

Notes on Nursing - Florence Nightingale. Florence Nightingale. Notes on Nursing: What It Is, and What It Is Not. Published by Good Press, 2019. But the Registrar-General would certainly never think of giving us as a cause for the high rate of child mortality in (say) Liverpool that there was not sufficient hospital room for children; nor would he urge upon us, as a remedy, to found an hospital for them. Again, women, and the best women, are wofully deficient in sanitary knowledge; although it is to women that we must look, first and last, for its application, as far as household hygiene is concerned.

Florence Nightingale’s 79-page monograph reflects the intelligence, efficiency, and administrative talent of the .

Florence Nightingale’s 79-page monograph reflects the intelligence, efficiency, and administrative talent of the woman who inaugurated the professional training of nurses in England and, indirectly, in the United State. he need for radical reform in the care of the sick was made evident to Miss Nightingal. hrough service in the barracks hospital in Scutari during the Crimean Wa. Notes on Nursing was written with simplicity and direct common sense, enlivened by occasional sharp wi. otes on Nursing is one of the seminal books of the modern world (Lilly, 215).

Florence Nightingale1 de enero de 1861

Florence Nightingale1 de enero de 1861. Library of Alexandria. They are meant simply to give hints for thought to women who have personal charge of the health of others. Every day sanitary knowledge, or the knowledge of nursing, or in other words, of how to put the constitution in such a state as that it will have no disease, or that it can recover from disease, takes a higher place. It is recognized as the knowledge which every one ought to have-distinct from medical knowledge, which only a profession can have.

Nightingale, Florence, 1820-1910. It has all but one of the textual errors uncorrected-"arrow root" has been corrected to "arrowroot. It has the first state of the ads, with the date "1860" on the fourth line of the first paste down and the "8" in large font Magee, D. Victoria .


iSlate
First I am an RN (an OLD RN) and to me modern Nursing began with Miss Nightingale. Prior to her works hospitals were a place to be feared. Nurses were women who were paid in Port Wine and worked 20 hour days carrying slop buckets and then delivering meal trays or changing bandages. Miss Nightingale along with Dr Ignaz Semmelweis on th emedical side,brought the simple idea of cleanliness equals health to the public. The simple act of hand washing and circulating air by opening windows made dramatic changes in a patient's chance of survival. Prior to that era doctors would go from autopsy to surgery to office hours and never wash their hands or change their bloody coat. (That's just nasty isn't it?)

Now the younger Nurses I know say Miss Nightingale was old fashioned and something of a prude as it came to what a Nurse is. Well maybe so, but if it had not been for someone beginning a school to educate Professional Nurses there would not BE the career/calling/occupation of A NURSE for the past century or more. We don't wear aprons, don't wear caps, don't salute the doctors, but we DO make all the difference in patient care. Thank you Miss Nightingale for being A NURSE!

I downloaded this as a free book, but just as well would have paid for a hard copy as it is a classic beauty in my opinion.
Mallador
This is a classic and I recommend that it be read by all nurses. Nightingale was a pioneer. She established the dignity and importance of educated nursing care for the care of the sick -- and for the health of the community. While it may seem quaint at some points, the importance of her basic insistence on sanitation cannot be over emphasized. It was a new idea in Victorian England! It remains very important in modern health care with the rise of super infections which resist antibiotics. Note: The first antibiotic was not available to health care of that era -- the first antibiotic was penicillin, used initially to treat sypillis in soldiers during WW II.
Gaeuney
Remember, clean the bedpan after every use. Once a day is not often enough. Open a window so you patient doesn't smother in the stink.
Did someone really have to tell us these things? Yes, someone did. And Florence did so, in a clear and precise manner with a touch of wit. I wish more people knew of her insight and wit, which survives to this day. On women's dress in the Victorian age she says, "the dress of women is daily more and more unfitting them for any mission or usefulness." and then jokes, "every woman now either shuffles or waddles" from all the crinoline and lace. In regards to visitors she advises nurses that the patient should not be surprised "except by thieves."
And yet there are other gems here that modern nurses will see as well, like informing her readers that it is rude to talk to the doctor about them in their hearing or that you should sit and not appeared rushed when patients need to talk.
Cae
Much of what is contained in this book will be recognized by nurses today. The need for sanitation, healthy food, and plain common sense is relevant today. Without Florence Nightingale nursing would not be the respected profession it is today. I referenced this book several times when writing papers for my BSN and MSN. Miss Nightingale was also a statistician whose work is still recognized today. She put her statistical data to use in convincing those in power that reforms in healthcare needed to take place. Miss Nightingale could have, with her large private income, lived in the lap of luxury but instead went to the Crimea and provided care to those in great need. That experience is the basis for the nursing care we provide today.
Porgisk
I know this is a classic piece of nursing history and Florence certainly doesn't need my approval - she has already endured. But the format of this version is easy to read and follow. I liked that part a lot.

I read this as a requirement for a class, but in the end, wondered why I had never read it before that? The class drew comparisons between then and now - and that made it extremely interesting to read.

Anyone in the medical field should read this at least once.

The language might put some off (Florence didn't speak modern English of course), but the reasonably intelligent can get through the language from long ago just fine. I enjoyed that challenge. It's a short read if the challenge of the language puts anyone off.
GEL
As a Registered Nurse for over 26 years, I have never read this work before. It was free on Kindle and came highly recommended. What a wonderful glimpse of the foundations of nursing. Although it can be viewed as a historical text, it also is fine contemporary reading. As nurses, we become so focused on the science and technology,(and dare I say, overrun by the weight of our workloads and liability that comes with it) the ability to "minister" to the human being before us is lost.. daily barriers prevent us from providing the "care" that is fundamental. Interventions such as light, fresh air, sleep and comfort and "quieting of the mind from excessive worry" are not just interventions to be used in the absence of technology but as an important adjunct to it. Also in the spirit of taking care of ourselves, this work contains valuable insights for us as well. Elegant historical prose is refreshing. She was indeed a wise visionary. As I was reading, I wondered what she would say about nursing today...
Jox
Ms. Nightingale was an extremely intelligent and severe woman. I wish I had met her in person. However, this discussion on good nursing is inspiring, but a little redundant at times. It is actually useful to anyone caring for sick people, even a parent, sitter, or nurse's aide.
Glad to get another book for my library to replace other nursing books lost in the house fire. I absolutely LOVE Florence Nightingale.

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