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» » The Math Book: From Pythagoras to the 57th Dimension, 250 Milestones in the History of Mathematics (Sterling Milestones)
The Math Book: From Pythagoras to the 57th Dimension, 250 Milestones in the History of Mathematics (Sterling Milestones) e-book

Author:

Clifford A. Pickover

Language:

English

Category:

Math

Subcategory:

Mathematics

ePub size:

1180 kb

Other formats:

doc txt mbr lrf

Rating:

4.2

Publisher:

Sterling; 1 edition (September 1, 2009)

Pages:

528

ISBN:

1402757964

The Math Book: From Pythagoras to the 57th Dimension, 250 Milestones in the History of Mathematics (Sterling Milestones) e-book

by Clifford A. Pickover


This book basically covers the history of Mathematics in a very concise, but thoughtful way. Although the book is not a complete history, then again 500 pages would be barely enough to cover a complete history, but "The Math Book" covers some essential points

This book basically covers the history of Mathematics in a very concise, but thoughtful way. Although the book is not a complete history, then again 500 pages would be barely enough to cover a complete history, but "The Math Book" covers some essential points. Pickover tried to do a couple of things when he wrote this book.

This book basically covers the history of Mathematics in a very concise, but thoughtful way.

The book lets readers glimpse the history and development of mathematics and leaves a sense of awe at just how far the .

The book lets readers glimpse the history and development of mathematics and leaves a sense of awe at just how far the field has come. sees patterns in everything he looks at, and thinks in logical ways that the average person would scratch their head about

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Series: Sterling Milestones. Simultaneous discovery has often occurred in the history of mathematics.

Series: Sterling Milestones. File: EPUB, 5. 4 MB. Save for later. As I mention in my book The Möbius Strip, in 1858 the German mathematician August Möbius (1790–1868) simultaneously and independently discovered the Möbius strip (a wonderful twisted object with just one side) along with a contemporary scholar, the German mathematician Johann Benedict Listing (1808–1882).

Clifford A. Pickover.

Mobile version (beta). Clifford A. Download (pdf, 4. 9 Mb) Donate Read.

The book covers thousands of years of the history of math and goes back past the The Math book is quite interesting although Im not sure whether this is more of a Math or History book, but it was still very fun to read and I learned a lot more about Euler and other famous mathematicians. The book flows very nicely and the pictures really help to grasp strange concepts that would otherwise be very confusing. It is fun to read for anyone who has an interest in math, history or the sciences.

Math’s infinite mysteries and beauty unfold in this follow-up to the best-selling The Science Book. Beginning millions of years ago with ancient ant odometers and moving through time to our modern-day quest for new dimensions, it covers 250 milestones in mathematical history

Math’s infinite mysteries and beauty unfold in this follow-up to the best-selling The Science Book. Beginning millions of years ago with ancient ant odometers and moving through time to our modern-day quest for new dimensions, it covers 250 milestones in mathematical history. Among the numerous delights readers will learn about as they dip into this inviting anthology: cicada-generated prime numbers, magic squares from centuries ago, the discovery of pi and calculus, and the butterfly effect. Pickover received his PhD from Yale in Biophysics and Biochemistry, and has written more than 40 books and over 200 articles

Math’s infinite mysteries and beauty unfold in this follow-up to the best-selling The Science Book. Pickover received his PhD from Yale in Biophysics and Biochemistry, and has written more than 40 books and over 200 articles. For many years he was the lead columnist for Discover magazine’s Brain-Boggler, and is known for his calendar and card sets, Mind-Bending Visual Puzzles.

Torrent details for "The Math Book - From Pythagoras to the 57th Dimension, 250 Milestones in the History of Mathematics. The Math Book - From Pythagoras to the 57th Dimension. 4. 9 MB. Description. The Math Book - From Pythagoras to the 57th Dimension, 250 Milestones in the History of Mathematics (Sterling Milestones).

Math’s infinite mysteries and beauty unfold in this follow-up to the best-selling The Science Book. Beginning millions of years ago with ancient “ant odometers” and moving through time to our modern-day quest for new dimensions, it covers 250 milestones in mathematical history. Among the numerous delights readers will learn about as they dip into this inviting anthology: cicada-generated prime numbers, magic squares from centuries ago, the discovery of pi and calculus, and the butterfly effect. Each topic gets a lavishly illustrated spread with stunning color art, along with formulas and concepts, fascinating facts about scientists’ lives, and real-world applications of the theorems.

 

Alsantrius
But my math-expert friend really liked this one! This series of books are very good introductions to the subjects, yet still of interest to those with a good degree of expertise. They are all similar in format: 9" tall, 7.5" wide and some 330 pages thick. At a weight of 3 pounds, they are probably not your first choice for airplane reading, but they are excellent on a living-room or bedside table. Each presents 250 topics in the chosen subject matter, with 250 beautiful full-page photos or illustrations and a full page of text. I have purchased several for myself and friends. There is some overlap between the Physics and Space volumes; Astrophysics is now a large part of astronomy and space physics. There is less overlap and more history in theMath volume. All are highly recommended.
Mataxe
I would have given this a 5 star if the graphics were better. Trying to explain Prince Rupert's Cube in pure text form was difficult to understand without smart graphics. An entire page was wasted with Prince Rupert's portrait. I don't care what he looked like, I just wanted to understand the concepts. Even the graphics that were provided in other chapters were not well done with not a lot of thought. Very disappointing in that regard. Had to google a lot to fill in the blanks that were missing in this book. Scope of the material was excellent though.
Benn
This is a coffee table book of blurbs about 250 well known and relatively comprehensible milestones in mathematics, accompanied by illustrations on facing pages and cross-indexed with references to blurbs on related topics, which leaves us with a broad grasp of the role of mathematics in advancing civilization, but a necessarily fragmentary understanding of the very deep topics specifically described.

Mathematically unsophisticated readers will end up with a fair idea of what a Bessel function or a zeta function looks like, some notion of what it's for, and enough of the fundamentals to convince ourselves that with a little effort we could figure out what it actually is. If we choose to do so, eight pages of bibliography reference books, periodicals, and websites for further reading. This would be a good primer for a college-bound youngster.
Went Tyu
All of the entries are disappointingly short. So short that he doesn't even identify all of the terms he brings up. It's a shame because this book could have been really entertaining if he'd have stretched those half page snippets to a page and a half. If you really want this book I suggest getting the hard cover version as it is better suited for use as a coffee table book than something you actually read. If a picture is worth a thousand words then the picture to text ratio is about 10 to 1.
Perongafa
While I myself take a keen interest in all sorts of things, especially science & math, intellectually-driven, you might say, I confess that I am astonded by Clifford Pickover and his far-ranging intellect. He delivers a rich smorgasbord of intellectual delights in this book, and I am delighted beyond words. I have also read his "Computers and the Imagination" and am also currently working on "A Passion for Mathematics." I love this stuff!

Pickover has an excellent way of making mathematical ideas accessible to those of us who cannot ascend the heights frequented by career mathematicians, or do not have the mental clarity or discipline it takes to delve more deeply into math. I myself hit the wall at about 2nd year calculus. I'd very much like to understand things like the Riemann Hypothesis, for example. But I can't. The subtleties of Cantor's Transfinite numbers, the Continuum Hypothesis, etc. somehow escape me. I can't begin to imagine why it takes several hundred pages to prove that 1 + 1 = 2 (Principia Mathematica), or why anyone would care. Pickover explains it so I can at least get a bit of a handle on it.

I don't guarantee that you wil "get" everything in "The Math Book." I didn't. But you absolutely will find more than a few things that intrigue or astound you. It's great fun!
Olma
As a Math teacher, I get the "Can I do extra credit?" question a lot. The Math Book stays on my desk to answer just this question. Students look through it for a topic (or ten!) that pique their interests and that they can delve deeper into via outside research for their extra credit assignments. It's a book that belongs on every Math teacher's desk as well as on the coffee tables of just about everyone else.

As you turn each page, you are surprised by yet another full-page picture relating to the previous page's concise summary of some even stranger mathematical topic. Everything is cited, making this book a complete summery of every cool Mathematical topic from Archimedes to Zeno!

This book is by far the best Math book I own and have ever read. It is truly awesome beyond words!
generation of new
Purchased this item as a gift for my boyfriend who loves math. Coming from someone not very interested in math, in my opinion the book is still great. There are high-quality pictures to go with every event; some are very interesting. The information included is easy enough to understand for someone not highly versed in this area, but my boyfriend who majored in math still loves all of the facts included. Overall, great purchase!
Lisbeth Salander, the fictional gifted mathematical genius of the late
Stieg Larsson's phenomenal best sellers, "The Girl Who Played with
Fire", "The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo", and "The Girl Who Kicked
the Hornet's Nest", would have read Clifford A. Pickover's "Math Book" to
understand "Fermat's Last Theorem". Salander is constantly solving
math problems, during her intriguing adventures and that's what lead
me to Pickover's superb book. The great mathematical problems of the
past are explained with clear language, an almost impossible
task in textbooks, and images. This book is a collector's item, to
be used for information, and made part of your library. It will
make you smarter, and will be cherished by all book lovers.

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