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» » Wonderful Life: The Burgess Shale and the Nature of History
Wonderful Life: The Burgess Shale and the Nature of History e-book

Author:

Stephen Jay Gould

Language:

English

Category:

Math

Subcategory:

Biological Sciences

ePub size:

1799 kb

Other formats:

azw doc mobi docx

Rating:

4.4

Publisher:

W. W. Norton Co.; 1st edition (1989)

Pages:

352

ISBN:

0393027058

Wonderful Life: The Burgess Shale and the Nature of History e-book

by Stephen Jay Gould


Although not described as such, Stephen Jay Gould's book "Wonderful Life, The Burgess Shale and the . That then is the real and major importance of this book, in addition of course, to its great value when describing early examples of animal life forms.

Although not described as such, Stephen Jay Gould's book "Wonderful Life, The Burgess Shale and the Nature of History" is in fact case studies of all the aspects revealed in the case study of the discovery of, and subsequent reassessment of, a Cambrian largely soft bodied fossil assemblage. Author of "Rammmi's Children.

Other Titles By Stephen Jay Gould. Chapter II presents the requisite background material on the early history of life, the nature of the fossil record, and the particular setting of the Burgess Shale itself. Preface and Acknowledgments.

Gould holds that the Burgess Shale discoveries are representative of the Cambrian Explosion which produced many distinctly different body plans few of which survived. Thus most Burgess Fossils were not precursors of modern forms. He calls the variety of distinct body plans comprising different phyla disparity and differentiation within phyla diversity.

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T. Hill: The only personal ambition that I have or have had, that would influence me greatly, is the desire to complete the work on the Cambrian rocks and faunas, which was begun many years ago and which has practically been laid aside for several years past. I hope to give a little time to it this summer, and to do what I can from time to time to complete it.

Wonderful Life: The Burgess Shale and the Nature of History is a 1989 book on the evolution of Cambrian fauna by Harvard paleontologist Stephen Jay Gould. The volume made The New York Times Best Seller list, was the 1991 winner of the Royal Society's Rhone-Poulenc Prize, the American Historical Association's Forkosch Award, and was a 1991 finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. Gould described his later book Full House (1996) as a companion volume to Wonderful Life.

In Wonderful Life, Stephen Jay Gould traces the history of this incredible find and comes to some controversial conclusions of his own. The book, published in 1989, was a best seller and won the Aventis prize for science books in 1991 and was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in that. The book, published in 1989, was a best seller and won the Aventis prize for science books in 1991 and was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in that same year. Some of Gould's colleagues agreed with his conclusions, some did not.

Born in New York City in 1941, Stephen Jay Gould received his . from Antioch College in New York in 1963 and a P. in paleontology from Columbia University in 1967

Born in New York City in 1941, Stephen Jay Gould received his . in paleontology from Columbia University in 1967. Gould spent most of his career as a professor at Harvard University and curator of invertebrate paleontology at Harvard's Museum of Comparative Zoology. Gould was a leading proponent of the theory of punctuated equilibrium.

Электронная книга "Wonderful Life: The Burgess Shale and the Nature of History", Stephen Jay Gould

Электронная книга "Wonderful Life: The Burgess Shale and the Nature of History", Stephen Jay Gould. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Wonderful Life: The Burgess Shale and the Nature of History" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Mr. Gould is an exceptional combination of scientist and science writer. High in the Canadian Rockies is a small limestone quarry formed 530 million years ago called the Burgess Shale. He is thus exceptionally well placed to tell these stories, and he tells them with fervor and intelligence. It hold the remains of an ancient sea where dozens of strange creatures lived-a forgotten corner of evolution preserved in awesome detail.

"[An] extraordinary book. . . . Mr. Gould is an exceptional combination of scientist and science writer. . . . He is thus exceptionally well placed to tell these stories, and he tells them with fervor and intelligence."―James Gleick, New York Times Book Review

High in the Canadian Rockies is a small limestone quarry formed 530 million years ago called the Burgess Shale. It hold the remains of an ancient sea where dozens of strange creatures lived―a forgotten corner of evolution preserved in awesome detail. In this book Stephen Jay Gould explores what the Burgess Shale tells us about evolution and the nature of history.
Drelalen
Stephen Gould, at his best, is a marvelous science writer. The beginning of this book is utterly compelling: written with the aplomb one would expect from Gould, who describes the wonders of evolution. However, after setting up this evolutionary mystery to be solved, he breaks his promise (made earlier in the book) to clarify terms for the lay reader. As a result the second half of the book is an exercise is comparative anatomy and taxonomy that left me confused and-unfortunately-uninterested. I had to put it down and give up. And I don't give up easily. It is a shame we lost Gould at such a young age. I know he could have made this book into a more accessible one.
Kanal
What a wonderful writer, scientist and educator. Gould's passion for explanation of the evidence for evolution of living things on our planet is shown here. Instead of the same old dinosaur story we find ourselves exploring life long before dinosaurs appeared. How many people even consider that there must have been life that led up to the relatively recent dinosaurs?
Gould writes to be accessible to all people, certainly not just scientists. But he's also faithful to the science, patiently describing the evidence and its place in the story.
Illustrations are plentiful and add greatly to the explanations.
My personal favourite fossil, the amazing pikaia, is left to the end. I wanted more about this little treasure. For this I removed a star.
For the rest of the book I give five stars.
If you're interested in the real history of life on Earth, you'll be glad to read this. Especially if you're not a traditional scientist.
Zicelik
In British Columbia, Canada paleontologist Charles D Walcott made the discovery of a lifetime. The year was 1909 and Walcott's field season was just winding down when he and his team began finding fossils in the Burgess Shale formation of the Rocky Mountains. Over the next 15 years Walcott collected thousands of strange and unusual fossils that he considered to be ancestral to all of our modern day phyla. In Wonderful Life, Stephen Jay Gould traces the history of this incredible find and comes to some controversial conclusions of his own. The book, published in 1989, was a best seller and won the Aventis prize for science books in 1991 and was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in that same year. Some of Gould's colleagues agreed with his conclusions, some did not. The resulting debates went on for years and, on some points, continues to this day. Although some of his original examples were later invalidated by newer research, his main theme is still a matter of some contention. Anyone who has read Gould's monthly essays in Natural History magazine knows that he is an accomplished writer for the interested layperson and Wonderful Life is no exception to that rule. Some 50 years after Walcott's time, in the late '60s a team of of modern scientist led by Harry Whittington did a extensive rework of Walcott's original study resulting in new insights on the biology of these long dead animals. Gould does a detailed accounting of the methodology and technics used in that study. Some of Whittington's findings agreed with Walcott's and some did not, but from this layman's point of view, it made for fascinating reading. A good part of the book addresses some long standing questions in paleontology. Multicellular animals make their first appearance in the fossil record with the Cambrian Explosion and with the Ediacara fauna. How did life get to that point? Did evolution proceed from a simple beginning that, over time, became more complex and diverse? Or did one-celled life first evolve, in a kind of explosion, into many varieties of multi-celled organisms, only a few of which survive today? Did Walcott "shoehorn" his fossils into modern phyla? Were some of the Burgess Shale animals just dead ends that were out competed in the race for survival? The answers to these questions depend on who is doing the analysis and who is doing the asking. In paleontology the study of fossils is like having an obscure, imperfect view of reality and it's only with time and further study that we can get closer to the truth. Wonderful Life is a great book that will give you one mans view on the nature of history and of life.

LastRanger
Kabei
This is a great scientific book that helps explain an apparent contradiction in evolution. Why are there so few but vastly different animal types in the world today? A jellyfish seems to have little in common with a song bird. And yet it is
easy to identify and name the leg bones of a T Rex from hundreds of millions of years ago because the bone structure is virtually identical to humans. The answer seems to be random physical events for which particular characteristics
of life forms have particular survival value. Thus evolution is not a steady march toward perfection but a journey through time interrupted by physical events that semi-randomly select for particular life forms.
Ubrise
Awesome book! It was my first foray into Gould's work, but after I made a visit to Yoho Natl. Park on a trip to Banff and heard about the invertebrate fauna in a historcial geology course, I had to learn more about it, and I'm glad I picked up this book. It is so eloquently written and every argument is highly structured, I really enjoyed reading it. For reference, I'm an engineering student with an interest in geology, so don't be put off by tales of extreme taxonomy or cladistics, it's all spelled out to the point where you can understand the important features and get a feeling for the whole story of the Burgess.
Dark_Sun
Excellent book! Stephen Jay Gould is a master when it come to taking a very complicated issue and boiling it down to an understandable point. His style of writing keeps the book flowing and easily readable. His topic is one that is usually way above the average person's head, but he brings it down to earth and doesn't insult you as he does it. Enough information and scientific conclusions to be useful to the more advanced reader or student.
Άνουβις
I am re-ordering this book because I destroyed the first one with notes, dog-eared pages, and highlighted passages. I am no Paleontologist so I've had to re-read it several times but it's a wonderfully thought-provoking work. In my library, it sits next to Brian Greene's "The Hidden Reality" for reasons that only make sense to my personal Dewey System. I'm hoping the hard copy will prove more durable for the trauma it will certainly continue to experience.

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