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» » A World Split Apart: Commencement Address Delivered at Harvard University, June 8, 1978
A World Split Apart: Commencement Address Delivered at Harvard University, June 8, 1978 e-book

Author:

Aleksandr Isaevich Solzhenitsyn

Language:

English

Category:

History

Subcategory:

World

ePub size:

1109 kb

Other formats:

doc txt mobi lrf

Rating:

4.3

Publisher:

HarperCollins Publishers (January 1978)

Pages:

61

ISBN:

0060906901

A World Split Apart: Commencement Address Delivered at Harvard University, June 8, 1978 e-book

by Aleksandr Isaevich Solzhenitsyn


Solzhenitsyn's warning of Western decline is as relevant today as it was twenty-five years ag. The split in today's world is perceptible even to a hasty glance. Any of our contemporaries readily identifies two world powers, each of them already capable of destroying each other.

Solzhenitsyn's warning of Western decline is as relevant today as it was twenty-five years ago. I am sincerely happy to be here with you on the occasion of the 327th commencement of this old and illustrious university. However, the understanding of the split too often is limited to this political conception: the illusion according to which danger may be abolished through successful diplomatic negotiations or by achieving a balance of armed forces.

com, Box 18, Newton, New Jersey 07860. It is also unusual to find a commencement address later published as a short book, and one which has both the Russian original on one page and the English Translation on the other.

On the afternoon of June 9, 1978, the author of The Gulag Archipelago delivered the commencement address at Harvard University before a. .

On the afternoon of June 9, 1978, the author of The Gulag Archipelago delivered the commencement address at Harvard University before a crowd estimated at more than 2. com, Box 18, Newton, New Jersey 07860.

Thus, A World Split Apart presciently outlines a modern dividing line. There is a fundamental problem that admirers of Solzhenitsyn have to address, the same problem that faces those devoted to any apocalyptic prophet

Thus, A World Split Apart presciently outlines a modern dividing line. It is not that between Left and Right. There is a fundamental problem that admirers of Solzhenitsyn have to address, the same problem that faces those devoted to any apocalyptic prophet. If the apocalypse doesn’t arrive, why, and what does that say about the prophet? To most, my bizarre-sounding calls to gird for war no doubt sound unhinged.

A World Split Apart book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking A World Split Apart: Commencement Address Delivered At Harvard University, June 8, 1978 as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Read by Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn.

Alexandr Solzhenitsyn. delivered 8 June 1978, Harvard University. I am sincerely happy to be here on the occasion of the 327th commencement of this old and most prestigious university. My congratulations and very best wishes to all of today's graduates. Harvard's motto is "VERITAS. Many of you have already found out, and others will find out in the course of their lives, that truth eludes us if we do not concentrate our attention totally on it's pursuit. But even while it eludes us, the illusion of knowing it still lingers and leads to many misunderstandings.

Aleksandr Isaevich Solzhenitsyn.

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Explore some of Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, Commencement Address at.Would you like us to send you a FREE inspiring quote delivered to your inbox daily?

Explore some of Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, Commencement Address at Harvard University, June 8, 1978. best quotations and sayings on Quotes. net - such as 'A decline in courage may be the most striking feature that an outside observer notices in the West today. The Western world has lost its civic courage, both as a whole and separately, in each country, in each government, in each political party, and, of course, in the United Nations .


Gandree
Was intrigued to read this after it was quoted in another book. It is not a book, it is the 1978 Harvard commencement address - so it is a quick read. Despite being 30 years old, it was very profound, thought-provoking and relevant. Hard to find cohesive and intelligent writing on this level - so even if you are not interested in politics or perspectives on socialism and humanity - this is a great example of how to convey your perspective intelligently.
Tar
Kenneth Ellman Reviews “A World Split Apart”, Solzhenitsyn and America, Harvard University Commencement Address 1978, From [email protected], Box 18, Newton, New Jersey 07860.
It is perhaps unusual to write a review of a Commencement Address, let alone a Commencement Address from June of 1978. It is also unusual to find a commencement address later published as a short book, and one which has both the Russian original on one page and the English Translation on the other. But Aleksandr I. Solzhenitsyn was not the usual commencement speaker nor the usual individual to speak of what he saw and felt as a Russian historical perspective from his exposure to America.

I have not carefully studied the works of Solzhenitsyn, although I like many others know of his extraordinary writings of the confrontation of Russian human beings with life.
His creation , The Gulag Archipelago, has sold over thirty million copies in thirty-five languages as just one example of what he accomplished in his life in addition to his other world renowned works.

Keep in mind that this speech by Solzhenitsyn was given in 1978 way before the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR) ceased to exist on December 26, 1991. So we have here a man immersed in the Soviet reality bringing to students at Harvard University a human experience so distant from what the average American, let alone a Harvard College student would have known, then and certainly today. His words can be read again and again for their import and warning. What is most strong and a dominant presence is the sense conveyed by Solzhenitsyn that there is something more, much more in the value of human life than is realized by many in America today. It is read that he pushes forth the idea of the power of the individual thought and perspective, separate and apart from the imposed cultural experience. He speaks of the disaster of the Soviets and of the terribly wasted intellectual opportunities of much of the daily American life. I would not tell you to accept all of what he speaks since you must deal with the ideas in your own context and need. My view may be different in some respects from his regarding the vast freedoms associated with the American legal system and the effect upon the individual. Solzhenitsyn of course speaks for himself and the below very short excepts should pull you to read the entire presentation.

On Page 17:
“I have spent all my life under a Communist regime and I will tell you that a society without any objective legal scale is a terrible one indeed. But a society with no other scale but the legal one is also less than worthy of man. A society based on the letter of the law and never reaching any higher fails to take advantage of the full range of human possibilities. Whenever the tissue of life is woven of legalistic relationships, this creates an atmosphere of spiritual mediocrity that paralyzes man’s noblest impulses.”

On Page 45:
“And yet, no weapons, no matter how powerful, can help the West until it overcomes it’s loss of will power. In a state of psychological weakness, weapons even become a burden for the capitulating side. To defend oneself, one must also be ready to die; there is little such readiness in a society raised in the cult of material well-being.”

He was a powerful mind, who died in 2008. The wisdom of his suffering and achievement is accessible through his literary treasures. This short speech is one of them. Our schools may not give this to our children, but you should. Help your children to take their place in our world, give them this book. I have treasured this book for many years and so will you.
Kenneth Ellman, email:[email protected], Box 18, Newton, New Jersey 07860
Teonyo
I love this edition (printed in English on the right and in Russian on the left) of Solzhenitsyn's 1978 commencement address to Harvard University students, "A World Split Apart." A warning to the survival of a soft society, his words are prescient. For instance, I randomly opened to page 19 and read: 'Today's Western society has revealed the inequality between the freedom for good deeds and the freedom for evil deeds. ...The defense of individual rights has reached such extremes as to make society as a whole defenseless against certain individuals. It is time, in the West, to defend not so much human rights as human obligations. ...destructive and irresponsible freedom has been granted boundless space. Society has turned out to have scarce defense against the abyss of human decadence ...When a government earnestly undertakes to root out terrorism, public opinion immediately accuses it of violating the terrorists' civil rights. ...This tilt of freedom toward evil has come about gradually, but it evidently stems from a humanistic and benevolent concept according to which man ...does not bear any evil within himself, and all the defects of life are caused by misguided social systems, which must therefore be corrected..." Sounds like current events, but Solzhenitsyn was speaking over 30 years ago. If these excerpts intrigue you, the entire speech is available free as an on line download. Just google "A World Split Apart, Solzhenitsyn."
Lavivan
A powerful sermon-like critique of two contrasting cultures. I believe strongly that he gets wrong the place of the press in a free society. The threat that power will be openly analyzed and critiqued by a free press is as key to Western contributions to civil society as the Magna Carta.

Given his personal history with totalitarianism, Pravda, I was saddened that he didn't give a more nuanced treatment of the press' role and responsibility, but to warn against gossip and rumor? Was he unaware of the Pravda-like role our mainline media plays and how easy it is for real journalism to be painted as gossip?!

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