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» » The Rise and Fall of the Plantation Complex (Studies in Comparative World History)
The Rise and Fall of the Plantation Complex (Studies in Comparative World History) e-book

Author:

Philip D. Curtin

Language:

English

Category:

History

Subcategory:

World

ePub size:

1612 kb

Other formats:

lrf rtf lrf azw

Rating:

4.2

Publisher:

Cambridge University Press; 2 edition (February 13, 1998)

Pages:

236

ISBN:

0521629438

The Rise and Fall of the Plantation Complex (Studies in Comparative World History) e-book

by Philip D. Curtin


Curtin charts the rise of the Plantation complex in south America and the Caribbean with reference to the internal history of Africa, the settlement history of the New World, economic history and a heavy emphasis on demographics.

Curtin charts the rise of the Plantation complex in south America and the Caribbean with reference to the internal history of Africa, the settlement history of the New World, economic history and a heavy emphasis on demographics.

May 20, 2018 Brian rated it it was amazing. Shelves: world-history. Books by Philip D. Curtin.

Though the plantation complex centered on the American tropics, its influence was much wider. These essays concentrate on the intercontinental impact. Over a period of several centuries, Europeans developed an intricate system of plantation agriculture overseas which was quite different from the agricultural system used at home. Though the plantation complex centered on the American tropics, its influence was much wider.

the breadth of Curtin's coverage and the immense learning and influence that he brings to this difficult task of synthesis doubtless puts The Rise and Fall on the short list of essential readings for anyone interested in Atlantic history

the breadth of Curtin's coverage and the immense learning and influence that he brings to this difficult task of synthesis doubtless puts The Rise and Fall on the short list of essential readings for anyone interested in Atlantic history. Francisco A. Scarano, International Journal of African History Studies.

Cambridge Core - Regional and World History: General Interest - The Rise and Fall of the Plantation . South Asian Plantation Histories and their Enduring Legacies: Indian and Atlantic Ocean Connections. Development and Change, Vol. 48, Issue.

Cambridge Core - Regional and World History: General Interest - The Rise and Fall of the Plantation Complex - by Philip D.

Soldiers of Fortune: The Rise and Fall of the Chinese Military–Business Complex, 1978–1998. Armonk, New York and London: .

Studies in Comparative World History. David A. Chappell, Journal of World History 'Anyone interested in New World foundations should begin with this collection; even experts will find thought-provoking moments here.

Studies in comparative world history. source: Nielsen Book Data).

Series: Studies in Comparative World History. By: Philip D Curtin(Author). 222 pages, 2 b/w illustrations, 22 maps. Publisher: Cambridge University Press. Chappell, Journal of World History. Anyone interested in New World foundations should begin with this collection; even experts will find thought-provoking moments here.

Get started today for free. All Documents from The Rise and Fall of the Plantation Complex: Essays in Atlantic History (Studies in Comparative World History).

Over a period of several centuries, Europeans developed an intricate system of plantation agriculture overseas that was quite different from the agricultural system used at home. Though the plantation complex centered on the American tropics, its influence was much wider. Much more than an economic order for the Americas, the plantation complex had an important place in world history. These essays concentrate on the intercontinental impact.
Danrad
I think I've mentioned this before, but always be on the look out for history books, published by Cambridge University Press, that cost less then five bucks. Paying attention to the publisher can save you a lot of wasted reading time.

A major trend in history over the last thirty years has been the shift away from books that dealt with The History of Country X or The History of the Such and Such War to books that try to relate multiple events to one another as well as the elaboration of areas of inquiry that span separate historical subjects. A major example of this trend is the rise of "Atlantic History" which seeks to relate what happened in the new world with events in the old world in a specific and non-specious manner. In American History, the most notable authors in this area are David Hackett Fischer and his seminal Albion's Seed as well as Bernard Bailyn.

The Rise and Fall of the Plantation Complex is a simple example of what I would call the "new atlantic history," written in an easy to read prose style that makes it accessible to anyone with an undergraduate level education. Curtin charts the rise of the Plantation complex in south America and the Caribbean with reference to the internal history of Africa, the settlement history of the New World, economic history and a heavy emphasis on demographics. It's a sophisticated, of the moment approach which undoubtably explains why the edition I read was the 13th edition of the 2nd printing (i.e. it's a hit.) Perhaps the success has something to do with the moderate length (200 pages) and almost total lack of foot notes- I'm guessing this book is an undergraduate staple in history departments on three different continents.
Zbr
Fantastic Book!
Malara
Despite being laced with annoying typos (this is from Cambridge Univ. Press?), I found the substance of the book to be most informative. The slave-labor sugar/cotton/tobacco plantation is a familar feature of early modern history, and is usually encountered in regional histories of, say, the Caribbean, or Brazil, or the United States. But this book traces the "plantation complex" from its beginnings in the eastern Mediterranean, on Cyprus, through its spread across the Atlantic, and its final last gasps in this century. People who are used to thinking of "slave plantations" exclusively in the context of the United States will be disappointed. For reasons explained by the author, his primary focus is on the sugar plantations of the New World--these tended to be purer examples of the phenomenon. He also spends a good deal of time analyzing the impact on African societies and economies; material which I found especially instructive. The account of the stepwise demise of slavery in Brazil was also very enlightening, especially how emancipation became an economic opportunity for entire classes of slaveholding plantation owners in the 1870's, similar to "mass layoffs" today. I think this book is crucial to understanding where the "New World" stands today--racially, economically and socially. You just have to ignore the typos.
heart of sky
Despite being laced with annoying typos (this is from Cambridge Univ. Press?), I found the substance of the book to be most informative. The slave-labor sugar/cotton/tobacco plantation is a familar feature of early modern history, and is usually encountered in regional histories of, say, the Caribbean, or Brazil, or the United States. But this book traces the "plantation complex" from its beginnings in the eastern Mediterranean, on Cyprus, through its spread across the Atlantic, to its final last gasps in this century. People who are used to thinking of "slave plantations" exclusively in the context of the United States will be disappointed. For reasons explained by the author, his primary focus is on the sugar plantations of the New World--these tended to be purer examples of the phenomenon. He also spends a good deal of time analyzing the impact on African societies and economies; material which I found especially instructive. The account of the stepwise demise of slavery in Brazil was also very enlightening, especially how emancipation became an economic opportunity for entire classes of slaveholding plantation owners in the 1870's, similar to "mass layoffs" today. I think this book is crucial to understanding where the "New World" stands today--racially, economically and socially. You just have to ignore the typos.

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