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» » A Church Undone: Documents from the German Christian Faith Movement, 1932-1940
A Church Undone: Documents from the German Christian Faith Movement, 1932-1940 e-book

Author:

Mary M. Solberg

Language:

English

Category:

History

Subcategory:

World

ePub size:

1427 kb

Other formats:

doc mobi rtf lit

Rating:

4.5

Publisher:

Fortress Press (April 1, 2015)

Pages:

486

ISBN:

145146472X

A Church Undone: Documents from the German Christian Faith Movement, 1932-1940 e-book

by Mary M. Solberg


A Church Undone includes a variety of German Christian documents, from major . The book includes a fascinating genealogy of the German Christian movement (44) and other photos that assist us to imagine the literary world in which the German Christians operated

A Church Undone includes a variety of German Christian documents, from major theological statements to obscure pamphlets. By giving a clearer picture of this movement and its followers, this volume offers important insights into the ideological debates that divided the German Protestant churches under Nazism. The book includes a fascinating genealogy of the German Christian movement (44) and other photos that assist us to imagine the literary world in which the German Christians operated. Each of the 21 chapters deserves individual attention.

The German Faith Movement (Deutsche Glaubensbewegung) was a. .A Church Undone: Documents from the German Christian Faith Movement, 1932-1940.

The German Faith Movement (Deutsche Glaubensbewegung) was a religious movement in Nazi Germany (1934–1945), closely associated with University of Tübingen professor Jakob Wilhelm Hauer  . The movement had around 200,000 followers at its height (less than . % of the population).

A Church Undone book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read

A Church Undone book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking A Church Undone: Documents from the German Christian Faith Movement, 1932-1940 as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

documents-flyers, pamphlets, and books. These documents have provided a basis for substantive historical and theological analyses of the Protestant church, the German Christian movement in particular, and their roles in the larger drama of the Third Reich. These documents have provided a basis for substantive historical and theological analyses of the Protestant church, the German Christian movement in particular, and their roles in the larger drama of the Third Reich Save. 1 The Original Guidelines of the German Christian Faith Movement. Joachim Hossenfelder. These ten guidelines were written by Pastor Joachim Hossenfelder and published in June 1932.

Mary Solberg, in A Church Undone, provides previously untranslated documents for close-in contact with the German Christian Faith Movement. Until religious perversion of truth and humanity are ended, the cautionary tale of this volume remains relevant. Larry Rasmussen Emeritus, Union Theological Seminary. Our temptation for seven decades has been to seek out and describe Christians in Germany who opposed the Nazi regime. The publication of these documents provides a very welcome corrective.

Solberg concludes that the German Christians constructed a powerful myth "that complemented, strengthened, and .

Solberg concludes that the German Christians constructed a powerful myth "that complemented, strengthened, and served National Socialist goals" (p. 3). They were "true believers, not only in Jesus Christ, but also in Adolf Hitler and his Nazi revolution," whose work enabled other Germans to understand life in the Third Reich "as fully compatible with their Christian faith" (p. 13. In terms of the Protestant Church Struggle, A Church Undone enables scholars and students to study the words and ideas of the (mostly) men who are often known simply as the enemies of Karl Barth, Martin Niemöller, and the Confessing Church.

Until A Church Undone: Documents from the German Christian Faith .

Until A Church Undone: Documents from the German Christian Faith Movement 1932-1940, however, dissemination of texts which helped illuminate the ways in which German Christianity was overtaken by Nazi ideology have been limited to German scholarship. But also here are essays from leading German theological lights of the era, such as Emanuel Hirsch, Gerhard Kittel, and Paul Althaus. This book is a must-own for anyone who works in the areas of Holocaust studies, 20th century Protestant theology, or Jewish-Christian relations. Larry Rasmussen, Reinhold Niebuhr Professor Emeritus of Social Ethics, Union Theological Seminary. Our temptation for seven decades has been to seek out and describe Christians in Germany who opposed the Nazi regime

Mary Solberg is recently retired from the religion faculty at Gustavus Adolphus College. Her most recent publication is 'A Church Undone: Documents from the German Christian Faith Movement, 1932-1940' (Fortress Press, 2015). Skills and Expertise.

Mary Solberg is recently retired from the religion faculty at Gustavus Adolphus College.

Responses to several German Christian documents from those who opposed them are also included in this volume.

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. Responses to several German Christian documents from those who opposed them are also included in this volume. But many other incisive, critical reactions to German Christian positions and activities, reactions that came both from within Germany and from ecumenical groups outside of Germany, remain to be translated and published.

Decades after the Holocaust, many assume that the churches in Germany resisted the Nazi regime. In fact, resistance was exceptional. Almost all Germans were Christians, and almost all Christians in Germany stood by, becoming intentionally or unintentionally complicit in Nazi policies and practices.

In the early 1930s, a movement emerged within German Protestantism with the aim of fully integrating Nazi ideology, German national identity, and Christian faith. The Deutsche Christen or, "German Christians," as they were called, interpreted the Christian faith and the role of the church in society in service of the Nazi revolution. They married centuries-old Christian anti-Judaism to the Nazis' racial antisemitism and sought to eradicate all traces of Judaism from Christianity. The "German Christian" publication program, designed to advance their ideology, included books and pamphlets, radio talks and speeches, as well as liturgies and retranslations of Scripture.

For the first time in English, Mary M. Solberg presents a selection of representative documents of the "German Christians." Her introduction to the volume sets the historical context of the movement and offers short introductions to each of the specific readings. The collection includes key responses critical of the German Christians by Karl Barth and Dietrich Bonhoeffer, among others.


Kage
Many who know the stories of Dietrich Bonhoeffer or Paul Schneider as representatives of the Confessing Church may assume that resistance to the Nazification of the Protestant Church was widespread. Nothing could be further from the truth. The vast majority of those identifying with the Confessing Church primarily resisted only insofar as they opposed German Christian interference in church government, not because of ethical objections to eliminationist policies against Jewish people or other victims of the Hitler regime.

This collection, expertly translated and introduced by Mary Solberg, provides readers and researchers materials, chronologically ordered, not previously available in English. The introduction locates the selections in historical context and poses the haunting ethical question: "If we were the German people of the time, could we expect to have responded any better?" The book includes a fascinating genealogy of the German Christian movement (44) and other photos that assist us to imagine the literary world in which the German Christians operated.

Each of the 21 chapters deserves individual attention. Perhaps most unnerving is the speech by Gerhard Kittel on "The Jewish Question," delivered already on June 1, 1933, in which he explicitly verbalizes, even while discounting, the possibility of "violent extermination of the Jews" (207). Solberg comments: "What is chilling about this 1933 statement is first that it was made at all--in a public lecture by a highly-regarded teacher-scholar . . . Furthermore, Kittel seems to dismiss the 'option' of extermination chiefly on the grounds of expedience . . . With historical hindsight, Kittel's statement and the complete absence of any expressed moral compunction take our breath away" (32-33). Other representative documents are "The Original Guidelines of the German Christian Faith Movement," "Speech at the Sports Palace at Berlin," "God's Word in German: The Sermon on the Mount, Germanized," and "The Godesberg Declaration and Responses."

This volume also includes "Theological Existence Today!" by Karl Barth, representative of the minority opposition to the German Christian tide. Selections by other major theologians--Kittel, Emanuel Hirsch, and Paul Althaus--demonstrate the varying degrees to which the theological establishment coalesced in support of the Third Reich. Taken together, the writings exhibit the effectiveness of propaganda, here guised in theological arguments, so to permeate public discourse that unthinkable premises begin to be taken for granted. This publication serves as a cautionary tale about the nature of public discourse in our own time, needful of confessing.
Shadowredeemer
Very helpful in seeing trends in American churches today. Same types of divisions and lack of awareness of what is coming upon it. Lukewarmness and compromise both then and now. Should be taken seriously.
Zainn
This book reveals a well hidden dark history to my church, the Lutheran Church. It is an important work that needs to be read. It is an example of colossal failure in the church and needs to be brought to light so that, going forward, the church can understand what it was not, what it is and what it should be.

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