ComicsChildrenHumorFitnessReferenceITLawCookingHobbiesTeachingSelf-HelpPhotoFantasyHistoryTestsCalendarsFictionLGBTTeenagersTransportMemorisMedicineMysteryRelationshipsPoliticsBusinessSpiritualityRomanceBiblesMathSportTravelOtherNo category
» » The Rise of Islamic State: ISIS and the New Sunni Revolution
The Rise of Islamic State: ISIS and the New Sunni Revolution e-book

Author:

Patrick Cockburn

Language:

English

Category:

History

Subcategory:

World

ePub size:

1648 kb

Other formats:

rtf txt lit lrf

Rating:

4.2

Publisher:

Verso; Revised ed. edition (February 3, 2015)

Pages:

192

ISBN:

1784780405

The Rise of Islamic State: ISIS and the New Sunni Revolution e-book

by Patrick Cockburn


Patrick Cockburn has produced the first history of the rise of the Islamic Stat. o one is better equipped . Instead he argues convincingly that the rise of ISIS is a complex phenomenon but he delivers a sharp rebuke to the politics and sectarian machinations of the Saudis.

Patrick Cockburn has produced the first history of the rise of the Islamic Stat. o one is better equipped for this tas. ndispensable.

New York: Verso Books. In the summer of 2014, over the course of one hundred days, the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIS) transformed the politics of the Middle East. Jihadi fighters combined religious fanaticism and military expertise to win spectacular and unexpected victories against Iraqi, Syrian, and Kurdish forces.

In his intelligent, important new book, Patrick Cockburn concentrates on the role of the Syrian and Iraqi conflicts in this new .

In his intelligent, important new book, Patrick Cockburn concentrates on the role of the Syrian and Iraqi conflicts in this new landscape of jihad. As a reporter for the Independent, Cockburn has built up a well-deserved reputation for sensible, sober journalism, rooted in time spent on the ground as well as thinking and reading. He recently won a deserved award for spotting the rise of the Islamic State well before other observers. Probably because, as The Rise of Islamic State explains, western policymakers have shown little but wishful thinking and inconsistency in dealing with the conflict in Syria or the supposed peace in Iraq for several years.

In his new book, Patrick Cockburn examines the roots and repercussions of a movement that was little known before . The days of Iraq as a unitary state may also be over. Its disintegration into separate Shia, Sunni and Kurdish regions cannot now be undone, Cockburn believes.

In his new book, Patrick Cockburn examines the roots and repercussions of a movement that was little known before its stunning blitzkrieg through Iraq in the summer of 2014, climaxing in the capture of the country's second biggest city, Mosul. It is a profoundly bleak analysis. Isis and its redrawing of the map of the Middle East are almost certainly here to stay. Download the new Indpendent Premium app. Sharing the full story, not just the headlines. Download now. How did things get so bad?

Patrick Cockburn may come as a surprise to American readers who do not follow his reports in the British newspaper .

Patrick Cockburn may come as a surprise to American readers who do not follow his reports in the British newspaper, The Independent. This book, published in November 2014, is a collection of his writings on Syria and ISIS and a summation of his opinion to that time. His assessment is not optimistic about stability in the region for some years to come and he is harsh in his judgment of the missteps that led us to this place.

Cockburn tracks ISIS’s beginnings to the rise of Al-Qaeda in Iraq (AQI).

The Rise of Islamic State: ISIS and the New Sunni Revolt By Patrick Cockburn Verso Books, 2015 There is a Syrian joke about the people from the city of Homs, which represents the middle of Syria, the overlap of urban and rural, east and west, north and south. Most of these books emerge from a place of deep Islamophobia and a misunderstanding of the region and its inhabitants, and form an attempt at legitimizing foreign intervention and empire. Patrick Cockburn, on the other hand, has long had a reputation for challenging the West’s stranglehold over the region, particularly in Iraq.

The Rise of Islamic State. ISIS and the New Sunni Revolution. The essential on the ground report on the fastest-growing new threat in the Middle East from the Winner of the 2014 Foreign Affairs Journalist of the Year Award. Born of the Iraqi and Syrian civil wars, the Islamic State astonished the world in 2014 by creating a powerful new force in the Middle East. By combining religious fanaticism and military prowess, the new self-declared caliphate poses a threat to the political status quo of the whole region. In The Rise of Islamic State, Patrick Cockburn describes the conflicts behind a dramatic unraveling of US foreign policy.

ISIS and the. New Sunni Revolution. First published under the title The Jihadis Return. by OR Books, New York and London 2014.

Out of the failures of Iraq and Afghanistan, the Arab Spring and Syria, a new threat emerges. While Al Qaeda is weakened, new jihadi movements, especially ISIS, are starting to emerge. How could things have gone so badly wrong? In The Rise of Islamic State, Cockburn analyzes the reasons for the unfolding of US and the West’s greatest foreign policy debacle and the impact that it has on the war-torn and volatile Middle East.

How the rise of Islamic State is changing history in the Middle East . Islamic State (IS, sometimes also called ISIS, ISIL or Daesh) is wrecking the post-colonial states of the Middle East. The caliphate now straddles swathes of Syria and Iraq; Egypt’s Sinai peninsula is becoming a war zone; and the chaos of Libya is giving jihadists a foothold that could become a province on Europe’s doorstep. Two books trace the origins of IS to America’s misbegotten invasion to topple Saddam Hussein in Iraq in 2003, the subsequent Sunni backlash against the newly enfranchised Shias and the appalling civil war in Syria.

The essential “on the ground” report on the fastest-growing new threat in the Middle East, from the winner of the 2014 Foreign Affairs Journalist of the Year Award Born of the Iraqi and Syrian civil wars, the Islamic State astonished the world in 2014 by creating a powerful new force in the Middle East. By combining religious fanaticism and military prowess, the new self-declared caliphate poses a threat to the political status quo of the whole region.In The Rise of Islamic State, Patrick Cockburn describes the conflicts behind a dramatic unraveling of US foreign policy. He shows how the West created the conditions for ISIS’s explosive success by stoking the war in Syria. The West—the US and NATO in particular—underestimated the militants’ potential until it was too late and failed to act against jihadi sponsors in Saudi Arabia, Turkey and Pakistan.
Dranar
From the beginning, I discovered this book was going to lead to headaches as I read it….not because of the writing, but because of the number of groups involved and their changing names and ideologies.

ISIS (also known as ISIL) began as Al-Qaeda in Iraq. It was determined to break the back of the Shia majority in Iraq and raise the Sunnis to complete power. Backed financially by countries such as Saudi Arabia, Bahrain and the UAE (all supposed US Allies) they began to undermine Iraq's government. They then moved into Syria with the goal of bringing down Assad and his government. They worked alongside an alphabet soup of different groups, until they determined they wanted all the power. And, they are working quickly to obtain it by whatever means necessary.

Things continue to change in the ISIS theater of war, making the writing of a book that is totally up to date almost impossible. Just when everyone thinks ISIS has gone as low as they can go, they hit a new low point. The book that exists explains ISIS and other organizations, how they interact and what the goals of these groups are….think overthrow and control of the entire Middle East.

If you are concerned about ISIS and the threat it poses, then this is a must read book. It is well written and contains the back story that so many news outlets never give. Reading this book scared me, as I don't believe any solution is in sight without a ground war. It saddens me to say it, but this group may start World War III.
Munimand
The book's subtitle is "ISIS and the New Sunni Revolution". The further into this book you read, the more you realize how fitting a subtitle that is. For ISIS is Sunni Islam, and they hate adherents to Shia Islam. And vice versa. When you heard about sectarian violence in Iraq that followed President Obama's pullback of U.S. troops around 2009, Sunni-Shia relations went completely off the rails.

Remember, too: back in 2014, al-Qaeda felt that ISIS was too extreme for even them and so severed ties with them.

Besides this sectarian violence you have many other jihadist groups operating in the area. Groups Cockburn brings into the discussion here include the Kurds; the Free Syrian Army, consisting early on of defectors from the Syrian military; al-Qaeda; Jabhat al-Nusra (JAN), a splinter group of ISIS but now affiliated with al-Qaeda; Islamic Front; Cechen rebels; Morrocon jihadists; the Salafist Ahrar ash-Sham, backed by Qatar and Turkey; Army of Islam, "created by Saudi Arabia as a jihadi counterbalance to JAN"; and Hezbollah, among others. Google "list of armed groups in Syrian Civil War" and you'll find a list of ~100 different groups.

Eye-opening and spine-chilling information abounds. Cockburn, an Irish journalist, is a correspondent for the British newspaper The Independent (among others), so his writing is crisp and engaging:

"Jihadi groups ideologically close to al-Qaeda have been relabeled as moderate if their actions are deemed supportive of U.S. policy aims" (p. 52).

"Al-Qaeda is an idea rather than an organization, and this has long been the case" (p. 54).

"An exit of senior Saudis, including bin Laden relatives, from the US was facilitated by the US government in the days after 9/11. Most significant, twenty-eight pages of the 9/11 Commission Report about the relationship between the attackers and Saudi Arabia were cut and never published, despite a promise by President Obama to do so, on the grounds of national security" (p.57).

"The US response to the attacks of 9/11 in 2001 targeted the wrong countries when Afghanistan and Iraq were identified as the hostile states whose governments needed to be overthrown. Meanwhile, the two countries most involved in supporting al-Qaeda and favoring the ideology behind the attacks, Saudi Arabia and Pakistan, were largely ignored and given a free pass" (p. 138).

And on and on.

Other gems include:
--Pakistani military intelligence training the Taliban
--Rampant corruption in the Iraqi state (before and after the 2003 American-led invasion that toppled Saddam Hussein)
--Rampant corruption in the Iraqi military, leading to easy jihadi takeovers of major Iraqi cities
--The year-long "Breaking the Walls" campaign to free other jihadi prisoners (estimates up to 1,500 prisoners freed)
--Misperceptions, naivete, and "simple-minded delusions" in the West regarding the "Arab Spring" uprisings in 2011
--A government in present-day Baghdad "that is as sectarian, corrupt, and dysfunctional as Saddam's ever was"
--The disintegration of Iraq into separate Kurdish, Sunni, and Shia regions
--Turkey's preference for ISIS over its Kurdish population

Interestingly, Cockburn does not address the serious cultural issues that complicate this picture even more. I mention them here as additional background:

1. Child marriages in Iraq. A 2013 report by the Population Reference Bureau states that 25% of women aged 20 to 24 were married before their 18th birthday (6% before 15).

2. Status of women in Iraq. That same 2013 PRB report states: "In Iraq, for example, a third of men believe that a father has the right to marry off his daughter before the legal age of 18; and more than half believe that a husband has the right to beat his wife if she disobeys."

3. Consanguineous marriage in Iraq. In 2006, the Christian Science Monitor reported that half of all marriages in Iraq are between first or second cousins. Perils of inbreeding are too numerous to list here.

These cultural issues are rarely discussed, I imagine, because they seem so unsolvable. But not addressing them now is not a solution and, in my opinion, complicates present-day policies and relations even more.

Back to Cockburn's book: Highly recommended as background information, but this is a very fluid situation. I wish I'd read this little book when it first appeared back in February 2015. Since then much has changed, most notably Russia overtly entering the fray with airstrikes targeting ISIS, starting in September 2015. Still, I can recommend this brief book as a solid introduction to the rise of ISIS in Iraq and Syria.
Aedem
After reading several articles by Patrick Cockburn in the London Review of Books, his warnings and insightful reporting seemed to demand a more detailed and substantive read. The book provides a comprehensive assessment into the Sunni insurgency and, while Cockburn is skeptical about impartiality, he takes great pains to avoid simplistic blaming for the crisis. Instead he argues convincingly that the rise of ISIS is a complex phenomenon but he delivers a sharp rebuke to the politics and sectarian machinations of the Saudis. The clumsy and inept Turkish state gets its fair share of responsibility as well as the corrupt and spectacularly naive Iraqi governments post-Saddam. And of course the neoliberal US post 9/11 administrations are culpable in ways that we might already be aware of. Cockburn's success here is not to fall into a partisan anti-American diatribe but to carefully and clearly point out the various interested parties in the conflicts. In a carefully worded last few paragraphs written in October 2014 he points to a terrifying potential which we have seen merge in the subsequent months. I look forward to reading further updates by this engaging and deeply engaged writer.
Yanthyr
A great book, this book ties together as best it can the issues that helped the Islamic State flourish in the middle east. It is a good read for anyone that is curious as to why it is such a mess over there.
Vichredag
Very interesting and easy to read. The book is written with a journalist style so a nice mix of analysis and description of events. Probably this is also the limit of the book itself. Certain parts would have deserved deeper analysis at the expense of easy reading.
Bolanim
For a such a short book and recent event, the book is fantastic, stunning and a must read. Hope the history changes and the story becomes different.

e-Books related to The Rise of Islamic State: ISIS and the New Sunni Revolution