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» » The Soccer War
The Soccer War e-book

Author:

Ryszard Kapuscinski

Language:

English

Category:

History

Subcategory:

World

ePub size:

1701 kb

Other formats:

mobi azw doc mbr

Rating:

4.2

Publisher:

Granta Books (February 28, 1998)

Pages:

240

ISBN:

1862071063

The Soccer War e-book

by Ryszard Kapuscinski


Only 19 left in stock (more on the way). Not having read Ryszard Kapuściński before, I picked this book up because I was interested in learning more about "The Soccer War" after I heard a BBC podcast about it. Knowing the book only had a single article about the Soccer War, I decided to read it anyway because the other topics seemed interesting.

See a Problem? We’d love your help. Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. The Soccer War. by. Ryszard Kapuściński

Part diary and part reportage, The Soccer War is a remarkable chronicle of war in the late twentieth century.

Part diary and part reportage, The Soccer War is a remarkable chronicle of war in the late twentieth century. Between 1958 and 1980, working primarily for the Polish Press Agency, Kapuscinski covered twenty-seven revolutions and coups in Africa, Latin America, and the Middle East.

The Soccer War is a book by Ryszard Kapuściński, the Polish press correspondent in Africa and Latin America in the 1960s

The Soccer War is a book by Ryszard Kapuściński, the Polish press correspondent in Africa and Latin America in the 1960s. The eponymous Soccer War erupts between the Central American Republics of Honduras and El Salvador, partially as a result of a football match between teams of the two countries. The deeper reasons for the conflict were political.

The Soccer War. About the author. Ryszard Kapuściński was born in 1932. During four decades reporting on Asia, Latin America, and Africa, he befriended Che Guevara, Salvador Allende, and Patrice Lumumba. He witnessed twenty-seven coups and revolutions and was sentenced to death four times.

similar names but distinct appearances. Such a dictionary would look more or less like this: 10 SILENCE. People who write history devote too much attention to so-called events heard round the world, while neglecting the periods of silence. This neglect reveals the absence of that infallible intuition that every mother has when her child falls suddenly silent in its room

Электронная книга "The Soccer War", Ryszard Kapuscinski.

Электронная книга "The Soccer War", Ryszard Kapuscinski. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "The Soccer War" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

This is the summary of The Soccer War by Ryszard Kapuscinski. 15 Удивительных Функций Телефона, о Которых вы Никогда Не Слышали - Продолжительность: 8:51 AdMe. ru - Сайт о творчестве Recommended for you.

An extract from THE SOCCER WAR. by Ryszard Kapuscinski(1969). Leftist Polish journalist appointed in 1964 by the Polish Press Agency as its only foreign correspondent; for the next 10 years he was "responsible" for 50 countries. had read a report on the soccer match between the Honduran and Salvadoran national teams. The two countries were playing for the right to take part in the 1970 World Cup in Mexico.


roternow
Not having read Ryszard Kapuściński before, I picked this book up because I was interested in learning more about "The Soccer War" after I heard a BBC podcast about it. Knowing the book only had a single article about the Soccer War, I decided to read it anyway because the other topics seemed interesting.

While other reviewers have said that about half the book deals with Africa, I think it is more like three-fourths of the book. Some of tales about about Kapuściński's bravery and nerve are a little egotistical (although I don't doubt they happened). He seems to enjoy talking about his hardships in an Ernest Hemmingway-like prose. The essays about Ben Bella in Algeria are fascinating. They offer a lot of assumptions that ring true, even though the essays are somewhat scant on details.

After reading "The Soccer War," I read that Kapuściński is something of a folk-hero among the literati, even though his critics say he mixes fiction with fact. Many of his stories do not seem true, such as his description of driving alone between two sides of a civil war, getting doused in benzyne and then let free after someone at a checkpoint laughs maniacally, ramming through the next checkpoint in his Peugeot, and then being sprayed with bullets and having Molotov cocktails hurled at him.

I also do not like the way he refers to Africans as having one mentality, calling them collectively "the black," is in "the black believes..." I don't know if this was acceptable when he was writing in the '60s, but describing all Africans in that same breath is certainly bad sociology and bad journalism if it isn't outright racist.

Kapuściński's article about the titular war glosses over the real context of it, focusing instead on the soccer games between Honduras and El Salvador, rather than focusing on the socioeconomic causes. Kapuściński claims that he was caught in a bombing raid in Tegucigalpa, although there was only one recorded in the war and it was at the airport, not the civilian neighborhood Kapuściński described. When he arrives at the front, he is one of the only reporters to witness firefights because the others had "weak hearts." Amazingly, a Honduran soldier hands Kapuściński his rifle while the soldier collects boots from corpses. He also greatly exaggerates the number of combat deaths, claiming there were more than 6,000 Honduran deaths when there were really only 3,000 combined deaths according to the most "generous" estimates.

It is clear, as his biographers state, that Kapuściński fictionalizes a lot of the work in his books. Perhaps his dispatches were more factual. Still, Kapuściński's book is interesting. It's easy to read because he jumps quickly from one essay to the next.
Yanki
I love Kapuściński's work. Many who criticize the book do so either because there is not enough straight-up journalism in it, or too much self-reportage and not enough plain old literature. They miss the point. He described his work as 'literary reportage;' and that is what it is.

If you've never been in similar circumstances, you cannot completely understand the motivation for Kapuściński's style. He lived in absurd times, under a Polish Soviet Communist regime that did its best to make everyone go along with Ivan in order to avoid bloodshed and slaughter. To wit: Witness the ambiguous status of Poland's last communist dictator, General Wojciech Jaruzelski. He was not strung up by the people or jailed by subsequent democratic governments after the wall fell. His defense was that he was keeping the country from a full Soviet take-over. His excuse is controversial, but such were the times Mr. Kapuściński lived in as he reported for the state run press.

Add to this the surreal aspects of the exotic places he reported from, and I don't see how anyone in his position could not take literary flight. I see him somewhat as a Polish Kurt Vonnegut, employing immediate literary prose to mine deep reality, sifting and shaking it to bring us horrible realities while understanding that life is both tragic and comic. Miguel de Unamuno stated that consciousness is a disease, and Kapuściński understood that, whether he ever read the quote or not.

He has been accused of artistic embroidery and sometimes making things up out of whole cloth, but you learn more about the places and times he wrote about from his books than you ever could by combing old newspaper clippings written by 'legitimate' journalists.

Ryszard Kapuściński was a brilliant and original writer. If one understands where he is coming from, one can then gain a greater appreciation for his works.
Kagaramar
This is a collection of essays that individually didn't have enough material to make a whole book from (unlike his Imperium and Shah of Shahs). None the less, it has all the best elements of Kapuscinski reporting - immediacy, non-judgemental, and thoughtfulness. As ususal, he goes places that are quite a few notches uncomfortable than hanging around the Pentagon or Capitol for news snippets - coups and revolutions in Dahomey, Ogaden, Algeria. In a handful of pages, he manages to draw vivid portraits of Ben Bella, Nkrumah and Boumedienne. And in one page, he brings out the horror of death when he describes how a dying unconscious soldier is closely watched by his fellow men. One drawback is that in a handful of essays (on Nigeria, Congo), he is too distant from the centre of action. Perhaps these chapters were best left out to avoid diluting what is otherwise a magnificent showpiece for journalism. The English version also has a few editing errors (Ben Bella flying back from Oran to Algeria!)
Quashant
Reasons why The Soccer War is brilliant:

1.) Kapuscinski doesn't pretend his reporting is the culmination of the coups he witnessed. He acknowledges the necessarily fragmented nature of his witnessing.

2.) Kapuscinski is a talented writer (very talented, or perhaps very hard working if you're Malcolm Gladwell).

3.) Kapuscinski is crazy. The man was sentenced to death four times. He witnessed and reported on 27 coups.

4.) Kapuscinski refused to write the easy, obvious narrative. This is true in books like Imperium as well. The man was one of those Truth Seekers.

5.) The subject is surreal but obviously real.

6.) And who was I?

A reporter.

Why was I traveling?

To look, to walk around, to ask, to listen, to sniff, to think, to write.

Aha. Where was I going to stay?

I didn't know.

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