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» » The Rivers North of the Future: The Testament of Ivan Illich
The Rivers North of the Future: The Testament of Ivan Illich e-book

Author:

David Cayley,Charles Taylor

Language:

English

Category:

History

Subcategory:

World

ePub size:

1585 kb

Other formats:

azw docx doc mobi

Rating:

4.2

Publisher:

House of Anansi Press (March 10, 2005)

Pages:

272

ISBN:

0887847145

The Rivers North of the Future: The Testament of Ivan Illich e-book

by David Cayley,Charles Taylor


In this provocative new book, respected Canadian journalist David Cayley compiles and reflects upon the thoughts of Ivan .

In this provocative new book, respected Canadian journalist David Cayley compiles and reflects upon the thoughts of Ivan Illich. Illich became perplexed in his theological studies by the notion of Revelation as it was theologically understood in a fallen world which was governed through various processes of.

Title: The Rivers North Of The FutureAuthor: Cayley, David/ Taylor, Charles (FRW)Publisher: PgwPublication Date: of Pages: Type: PAPERBACKLibrary of Congress: 2005360603

Title: The Rivers North Of The FutureAuthor: Cayley, David/ Taylor, Charles (FRW)Publisher: PgwPublication Date: of Pages: Type: PAPERBACKLibrary of Congress: 2005360603. The Rivers North Of The Future: The Testament Of Ivan Illich as told to David Cayley. The Rivers North Of The Future: The Testament Of Ivan Illich as told to David Cayley (Paperback) Overstock. com Shopping - The Best Deals on General Religion. Shop for The Rivers North Of The Future: The Testament Of Ivan Illich as told to David Cayley (Paperback).

Includes bibliographical references and index. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Trent University Library Donation.

Rivers North of the F. .In this provocative new book, respected Canadian journalist David Cayley compiles and reflects upon the thoughts of Ivan Illich, one of the 20th century's most visionary cultural critics. Illich believed that the West could only be understood as a corruption of the Christian New Testament. Cayley presents Illich's exploration of this idea, illuminating Illich's thoughts on In this provocative new book, respected Canadian journalist David Cayley compiles and reflects upon the thoughts of Ivan Illich, one of the 20th century's most visionary cultural critics.

In The Rivers North of the Future David Cayley has compiled Ivan Illich's moving and insightful thoughts concerning the fate of the Christian Gospel. Illich's view, which could be summed up as "the corruption of the best is the worst," is that Jesus' call to love more abundantly became the basis for new forms of power in the hands of those who organized and administered this New Testament.

In this provocative new book, respected Canadian journalist David Cayley compiles and reflects upon the thoughts of Ivan Illich, one of the 20th century's most visionary cultural critics.

Start by marking The Rivers North of the Future as Want to Read . With a foreword by Charles Taylor.

Start by marking The Rivers North of the Future as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Ivan Illich (1926-2002) was a brilliant polymath, an iconoclastic thinker, and a prolific writer. He was a priest, vice-rector of a university, founder of the Centre for Intercultural Documentation in Cuernavaca, Mexico, and author of numerous books, including Deschooling Society, Tools for Conviviality, Energy and Equity, and Medical Nemesis. His "testament," as recorded during these conversations with David Cayley, goes way behind the practical clarity of his earlier analytical work.

Similar books and articles. Ivan Illich on Education

Similar books and articles. Ivan Illich on Education. An Analysis and Evaluation of Ivan Illich's Social and Educational Philosophy in the Light of His Early Development and the Major Critiques of His Theories.

by David Cayley, Charles Taylor. Books related to The Rivers North of the Future.

In this provocative new book, respected Canadian journalist David Cayley compiles and reflects upon the thoughts of Ivan Illich, one of the 20th century's most visionary cultural critics. Illich believed that the West could only be understood as a corruption of the Christian New Testament. Cayley presents Illich's exploration of this idea, illuminating Illich's thoughts on the criminalization of sin, on how the Church has become a template for the modern nation-state, and how contemporary society has become a congealed and corrupted Christianity. These critiques are as timely and valuable as Illich's prescription for fixing them.
Grokinos
responsible yet radical and totally independent as a man and thinker
Fenrikasa
I was given this book to read by a postgraduate student-friend whom I had taught. He inscribed it, “an excellent volume, enjoy!” The book had remained on my bookshelf for three years before I got around to reading it. Interestingly, in the early 1970’s during my undergraduate years at the University of Toronto I had been exposed to the religious and sociological views of Illich, (either through courses by Gregory Baum or Leslie Dewart, I actually forget which), and found his views to be of peripheral significance. Today, however, I find that his perspective has informative value and is worth considering from an academic and philosophical point of view.

Cayley obviously thinks so, as well. Cayley wants to get at the bottom of Illich’s view that the corruption of the best is the worst and selects Illich’s religious writings to test this thesis. Religious institutions that regulate Revelation are an evil in Illich’s view. That such regulation, when it impedes personal choice, is an evil that slowly grows in human consciousness. According to Illich we choose our relationships with others and any institution that impedes our ability to choose is corrupt to some degree.

Cayley gives us 44 pages of Illich’s background by which he accounts for Illich’s understanding of the deformation of faith. Illich became perplexed in his theological studies by the notion of Revelation as it was theologically understood in a fallen world which was governed through various processes of institutionalization. Also, Illich was not a supporter of Vatican II and he believed the priestly office should be kept separate from civil politics.

He addressed his concern via religious studies, rather than strict theology. In addressing his concern as a theologian he would have acquired an institutional authority, he maintained. He is an historian and reminds the reader frequently of his status in this book. Illich maintained that he was not a theologian, yet, in truth, he discussed historical records from a theological perspective, and not simply religious studies. (I suspect that some who have read the book missed this point.)

This book is worth reading, but I caution the reader to distinguish between the faith of an individual Christian and institutionalized Christianity. It is the latter that Illich criticizes. Yet, there is much here, when properly understood, to encourage an individual’s faith.
Manazar
Although labeled and promoted as a book on christianity this work is much more. Anyone with a serious interest in history, social issues, social psychology or what one might do to make the world a better place will find plenty to think about in this very interesting read. I have no religious inclinations and found the aproach of looking for documented truth rather than proselytizing refreshing. This book should appeal to free thinkers of the left, right, and center. Although this book may stand alone, it is understood more easily if one has read Cayley's previous book with Illich, "Ivan Illich in Conversation," and the fine work by Lee Hoinacki "The Challenges of Ivan Illich; a Collective Reflection."

A real treat for free thinkers, and a challenge for folks with strong opinions.
Lanionge
Anyone who has read Illich knows that his thought was ever-evolving. This work extends his critique of christianity, along with providing glimpses of how we may pick up where he left off. He spoke truth when few listened. You owe it to yourself to read Illich and open your mind to his unique thought process.

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