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» » Reclaiming the Great Tradition: Evangelicals, Catholics Orthodox in Dialogue
Reclaiming the Great Tradition: Evangelicals, Catholics  Orthodox in Dialogue e-book

Author:

James S. Cutsinger

Language:

English

Category:

History

Subcategory:

World

ePub size:

1310 kb

Other formats:

rtf mobi mbr txt

Rating:

4.4

Publisher:

Intervarsity Pr (March 1, 1997)

Pages:

214

ISBN:

0830818898

Reclaiming the Great Tradition: Evangelicals, Catholics Orthodox in Dialogue e-book

by James S. Cutsinger


Reclaiming The Great Tradition book.

Reclaiming The Great Tradition book. Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. Reclaiming The Great Tradition: Evangelicals, Catholics & Orthodox In Dialogue.

Introduction: Finding the Center James S. Cutsinger. conflict with Orthodox Tradition and Orthodox Consciousness. Early in the spring of 1994, representatives of Rose Hill College and the Fellowship of Saint James considered the possibility of sponsoring an ecumenical conference for traditional Christians. It seemed an excellent marriage. 2 And yet it seems to me that Lewis’s insight can still be a most valuable one for us all, including even the most exclusive and antiecumenical of Christian traditionalists.

The contributors to this volume believe they hold nothing less in common than the Great Tradition - such elemental .

The contributors to this volume believe they hold nothing less in common than the Great Tradition - such elemental truth as the Trinity and the divinity (as well as humanity) of Christ, articulated in the ancient ecumenical creeds. Their essays probe what it would mean for Christians from different traditions to affirm together this Great Tradition. But they also tough-mindedly explore the real points of tension between Catholics, Protestants and Orthodox. Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserve. more).

Academic journal article Journal of the Evangelical Theological Society. Academic journal article Journal of the Evangelical Theological Society. This assembly, by contrast, did not want to compromise the soundness of the great Christian tradition; rather, it sought to explore a common center despite the acknowledged differences.

Real discussion about real issues - such as the filioque - are discussed by both Orthodox and Roman Catholic theologians; one gets a feel for both sides of an issue that remains divisive today. The book falls short, though, in two ways. Firstly, the Evangelicals are, in my opinion, not shown in the best light. That is, they do not portray themselves in the best light. J. I. Packer leaves much to be desired; Carl Braaten does the same.

Reclaiming the Great Tradition: Evangelicals, Catholics, and Orthodox in Dialogue, e. On Earth as It Is in Heaven: A Metaphysical Cosmogony," Sacred Web: A Journal of Tradition and Modernity," 1:1 (1998).

Reclaiming the Great Tradition: Evangelicals, Catholics, and Orthodox in Dialogue, ed. (InterVarsity Press, 1997). Not of This World: A Treasury of Christian Mysticism (World Wisdom, 2003). The Virgin," Sophia: Journal of Traditional Studies, 6:2 (2000).

Reclaiming the Great Tradition. Evangelicals, Catholics & Orthodox in Dialogue. by James S. Published March 1997 by Intervarsity Pr. Written in English.

Catholic–Lutheran dialogue is a series of discussions which began during July 1964 as an outgrowth of the Second Vatican Council

Catholic–Lutheran dialogue is a series of discussions which began during July 1964 as an outgrowth of the Second Vatican Council. These gatherings reflect the new openness of the Roman Catholic Church to dialogue with other Christian denominations as well as other religions. These dialogues have been primarily between by church representatives of the Lutheran World Federation and representatives of the Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity.

Evangelicalism Relations Catholic Church Orthodox Eastern Church. On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners.

Prominent scholars from Roman Catholicism, Eastern Orthodoxy, and Protestant evangelicalism attempt to discover the core of their common belief and ask what it would mean for them to affirm together the Great Tradition they share.
Qag
Thanks
Opilar
This book is the outcome of a conference between traditionally minded Christians several years back- Orthodox, Roman and Protestant.
Chapter two is an excellent overview of ecumenism in the past and where it is leading today by Fr. Neuhaus. He is the editor of First Things and a leading apologist for the rationality of the Faith. Chapter four, by Fr. Patrick Reardon, deals beautifully with the trinitarian theology of the east, as well as a strong dose of proper apophaticism. It is one of the better essays that I have read on the subject. He is also the author of Christ In The Psalms which is a fantastic devotional companion to the prayer book of the Church. Chapter five, by Bishop Kallistos Ware, deals further with the trinitarian nature of Christianity and is, like his other works and lectures, full of insight and faithfulness to the Orthodox tradition. Ware's Orthodox Way and Orthodox Church are standard introductions to Orthodoxy in the western world. The other essays, six in all, are well worth reading. Each essay is followed by a response which is either critical or supportive- usually both. Carl Braaten, a Lutheran scholar and editor of Pro Ecclesia, provides a summary that is quite insightful and useful. If you would like information about how to get the actual audio recordings of the conference, let me know via "about me" and I'll send you some numbers.
This is a book from which all Christians can benefit. As an Orthodox, I flatly reject the circle-the-wagons mentality of some who say that this book is anti-Orthodox. It is only a conference of thinkers and theologians and obviously not an Ecumenical council! Just dialogue. No one compromised anything. See for yourself. If you think so strongly that you have the truth, share it in a spirit of love and patience. Not everybody has to agree with you and do not forget that your need to be right all the time may have very little to do with love for the truth. Moreover, we can believe the right things for very wrong reasons. Talking to people who don't see things "our way" is one of the best measures of charity and a sure path to understanding. That is the underlying message of this collection of essays. Not all ecumenical activity is trying to sell the farm to create the rainbow universe of "it doesn't matter". Open your minds.
Nilarius
I, too, am thoroughly impressed with this book; it is interesting to read that as of the time of writing this review, the only detractors are those hard-line Orthodox who see themselves as having the fullness of truth - a claim that would be hard to justify using the Church Fathers. After all, isn't the whole point of the icon - so vital to Orthodox spirituality - recognizing that the boundaries that we draw cannot be the totality of revelation but instead operate as an open door - a window - to an experience of the Holy? I find the hard-line Orthodox views expressed below to be disappointing; having heard Fr. Peter Gillquist speak at the University of Florida recently, I am glad to know that not all Orthodox feel the same way about other Christians. As one Church Father put it - and it has become a rule of thumb in many Orthodox circles, as well as for those outside of Orthodoxy - "We know where the church is; we do not know where the church is not."
Of course, the Orthodox below raise a good point about the nature of ecumenism and the crisis that has come about in many ecumenical discussions: in looking for a common ground, many end up sacrificing all that makes them distinctive and one is left with something of a theological mush rather than anything substantive. Fortunately, the differences here are mentioned, just as the similarities are. Real discussion about real issues - such as the filioque - are discussed by both Orthodox and Roman Catholic theologians; one gets a feel for both sides of an issue that remains divisive today.
The book falls short, though, in two ways. Firstly, the Evangelicals are, in my opinion, not shown in the best light. That is, they do not portray themselves in the best light. J. I. Packer leaves much to be desired; Carl Braaten does the same. Perhaps the problem, though, is what Mark Noll discusses in his book _The Scandal of the Evangelical Mind_: there is no Evangelical mind. Evangelicals consistently portray themselves to have less and less to really offer other than a simplistic - and oftentimes uninformed - Biblicism; there is no real engagement with any tradition or history and this lack of roots results in a lack of creative engagement with the problems of the day. A notable exception is the work of someone such as Stanley J. Grenz; perhaps future ecumenical writings will consider including him as he may be one of the best - or at least most informed - minds in Evangelicalism today.
Secondly, this book does little to represent Anglicanism. Although J. I. Packer is (= calls himself?) an Anglican, his theology is so un-Anglican that one might rightly wonder what, if anything, his Anglicanism really means. Some say, perhaps rightly, that there is no Anglican theology proper but that there is Anglican worship proper and that Anglican worship proper is contained in the Book of Common Prayer. Hence, the Book of Common Prayer should feature heavily in discussions of Anglicanism. However, for Packer it does not and since Packer is the only Anglican in the book, this means that Anglicanism as such figures little into these discussions when Anglicanism - despite the problems in the American church - really ought to figure far more prominently (it is, after all, the second largest Christian church in the world!).
Caveats aside, this is a great book. Although hard-line Orthodox may see any participation in ecumenism as "betrayal", such hard-liners are at the margins of Orthodoxy and offer little to the world at large. This book provides a great introduction to the main differences between three large Christian churches - Roman Catholic, Orthodox, and Evangelical - as well as an introduction to common ground between them. Highly recommended.
Vichredag
Chapter two is an excellent overview of ecumenism in the past and where it is leading today by Fr. Neuhaus. Chapter four, by that "recent" convert (!) Fr. Patrick Reardon, deals beautifully with the trinitarian theology of the east, as well as a strong dose of proper apophaticism. Chapter five, by Bishop Kallistos Ware, deals further with the trinitarian nature of Christianity. The other essays, six in all, are well worth reading as well. Each essay is followed by a response which is either critical or supportive- usually both. Carl Braaten, a Lutheran scholar, provides a summary that is quite insightful and useful.
I had written a review a few weeks ago that was not accepted. This is the second attempt, so I toned it down. This is a book which all Christians can benefit from. As an Orthodox, I flatly reject the circle-the-wagon mentality of some who say that this book is anti-Orthodox. It is a conference of thinkers and theologians and obviously not an Ecumenical council in the true sense; just dialogue. No one compromised anything. See for yourself.

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