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» » Mccoy'S Marines: Darkside to Baghdad
Mccoy'S Marines: Darkside to Baghdad e-book

Author:

John Koopman

Language:

English

Category:

History

Subcategory:

Military

ePub size:

1423 kb

Other formats:

lit rtf lrf azw

Rating:

4.3

Publisher:

Motorbooks International (March 25, 2005)

Pages:

288

ISBN:

0760320896

Mccoy'S Marines: Darkside to Baghdad e-book

by John Koopman


McCoy’s Marines is a brilliant intersection of journalism and combat.

Praise for McCoy’s Marines: Darkside to Baghdad: War, death, pathos, personal sacrifice, courage, bravery, leadership, charisma, history. Follow Me (the newsletter of the 2nd Marine Division). McCoy’s Marines is a brilliant intersection of journalism and combat. In addition to detailing candid views of the war from the ground up, Koopman vividly portrays the brutal realities of killing without jingoism and cheerleading.

McCoy's Marines book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking McCoy's Marines: Darkside To Baghdad as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. They were the soldiers who pulled down the statue of Saddam Hussein.

McCoy's Marines isn't about the author, Koopman, wanting to be the main hero. The author writes about Col. McCoy

McCoy's Marines isn't about the author, Koopman, wanting to be the main hero. This is about a former Marine going to war as a journalist and everything experienced along the way. McCoy.

San Francisco Chronicle reporter and marine veteran Koopman was embedded in the Third Battalion, Fourth Marines, during.

McCoy's Marines: Darkside to Baghdad. Tell us if something is incorrect. San Francisco Chronicle reporter and marine veteran Koopman was embedded in the Third Battalion, Fourth Marines, during the most recent war in Iraq. He enjoyed a close working relationship with the CO, the battalion sergeant major, and several other members of the battalion.

Items related to McCoy's Marines: Darkside To Baghdad. Book Description: San Francisco Chronicle reporter and marine veteran Koopman was embedded in the Third Battalion, Fourth Marines, during the most recent war in Iraq

Items related to McCoy's Marines: Darkside To Baghdad. Koopman, John McCoy's Marines: Darkside To Baghdad. ISBN 13: 9780760320884. McCoy's Marines: Darkside To Baghdad. Book Description: San Francisco Chronicle reporter and marine veteran Koopman was embedded in the Third Battalion, Fourth Marines, during the most recent war in Iraq. This didn't destroy his ability to distance himself from aspects of the military that he never liked, or from political judgments on the war.

Praise for "McCoy's Marines: Darkside to Baghdad" " War, death, pathos, personal sacrifice, courage, bravery, leadership, charisma, history. "Follow Me" (the newsletter of the 2nd Marine Division) writes in a clipped, hard-boiled prose and stays. away-in the manner of the soldiers with whom he travels-from politics.

Download McCoys Marines: Darkside to Baghdad or any other file from Books category.

McCoy's marines by Koopman, John journalist. by Koopman, John journalist. Koopman, John journalist. Published 2004 by Zenith Press in St. Paul, MN. Written in English.


Pumpit
Am I the only one confused by the title of this book and the actual book itself? Title is McCoy's Marines: Darkside to Baghdad. This is not a story about the marines, it's a story about a reporter (John Koopman) who was along for the ride with the marines.

This is not a book like Blackhawk down or Thunder Run where a newspaper reporter who happens to write a book covers a story. This is in fact, an autobiographical story of his desire to leave his family and go play around in the sand. Any story he covers about the unit is ONLY related to his own experiences.

Are you going to learn about the big picture of this unit's involvement? Not really. Are you going to hear any stories form the actual marines doing the fighting? Nope. Will you hear about where Mr. Koopman sleeps and what he drinks and eats? OH YEAH!! Over and OVER and OVER!!! For a reporter who spends weeks in a unit involved in fighting, he actually has a very boring story. He sees a few dead bodies, is in the neighborhood of a few marines dying, and oh yeah he runs around with some fellow reporters.

If you need to know what is wrong with journalism now days, this book is a great example. The constant desire to make the story about the reporter, to make the reporters views the story, and the need to have an objective report takes second stage to grandstanding and making wild accusations. (If the reporter feels that it's friendly fire, who is to let the marine inquiry have any basis to his "witness" account. After all, the guy was hiding in a building when the vehicle was hit. Could radar, radio intercepts, or analysis of the impact have any legitimate claim to counter his belief?)

I hope this guy isn't still employed in a newspaper, or if he is, hopefully he's just handling the obituaries. he couldn't make those all about him, could he?
BoberMod
This is a solid, if dated, account of the Iraq invasion of 2003. Like many of the books that came out in the 2003-2005 timeframe, many observations have been overtaken by events. The invasion itself is barely a first chapter in the now 8-year-old war.

This book's value is for an upclose account of an embedded journalist doing his job. Even though it's titled "McCoy's Marines," it's not really the story of the Marine commander, or even his Marines. They are important 'characters,' of course, but this story is a closer look at John Koopman's daily life. He intercuts the narrative with letters sent him by newspaper readers at home, and focuses on his worries for his own family. Of course, those feelings were experienced by any soldier, so Koopman can 'stand in' for everyone, by relating what he was feeling.

The biggest flaw is just not enough Marines. He talks to the commander, McCoy, and the battalion's top NCO, but not enough of the young guys actually doing the fighting. Of course, the commander is going to have positive, upbeat things to say - and so would the junior Marines. But I think the junior guys would be a little more honest, and give a truer feel for what the 'average' man felt. 'Generation Kill' is a better example of this - though maybe it goes too far the other way, in presenting the Marines as combat junkies.

It's a good story, though not one that adds much to our knowledge about Iraq. Read it more for a look at what an embedded journalist might go through, rather than a story of Marines or soldiers.
Linn
I was looking more for a book on The Marines push to Baghdad. What I got was a reporter's view of the war.
Gavirus
The book is an add to my book collection of books that are on my CMC Reading list. Just like the others on the list it's important to a Marine and I know I will enjoy the read... Thanks for your support...
Vizil
always like reading positive books about the Corps. it was nice to read a story about the Marines from the point of view by an outsider looking in. couldn't put it down.
Bremar
Despite the few 'typos' and grammatical errors, overall a well written and easy to read book. Research was not really necessary as he was on the ground and gave us a 'çlose up' of what the marines experienced. A must read for those who want an insight into the soldiers war.
Samut
McCoy's Marine's is a first-hand account of going into Baghdad at the start of the Iraq War, as told through the eyes of an embedded journalist and Marine. It tells the story of McCoy and his brave team, the 4th Battalion/5th Marines, who led the way into Baghdad.

This book gives the reader a glimpse into the lives of our troops on the front lines. It includes both triumphs, tragedies, mistakes and some unintended consequences of the war. It also tells of the difficulties of trying to determine friend from foe while being forced to make split-second decisions in the heat of battle.

The book also shares some personal e-mails from family and friends back home trying desperately to connect with their loved ones overseas. The reader gets a taste of what some family members were feeling as well.

I gained a greater appreciation for the physical, emotional and mental challenges our troops face during deployment and the silent, secret scars they must bear for the rest of their lives, upon returning home.

It was a great read and I highly recommend it. May God bless all the men and women of our armed forces!
I like the truthfulness of his reproting. He got down and dirty along with the troops by living with them and knows what they feel and how they cope with the war.

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