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» » The Origins of the English Parliament, 924-1327
The Origins of the English Parliament, 924-1327 e-book

Author:

J. R. Maddicott

Language:

English

Category:

History

Subcategory:

Europe

ePub size:

1947 kb

Other formats:

mbr docx mbr mobi

Rating:

4.3

Publisher:

Oxford University Press; 1 edition (July 1, 2010)

Pages:

544

ISBN:

0199585504

The Origins of the English Parliament, 924-1327 e-book

by J. R. Maddicott


The Origins of the English Parliament 924-1327 will stand out as a notable text for parliamentary history. Andrew Broertjes, LIMINA.

The Origins of the English Parliament 924-1327 will stand out as a notable text for parliamentary history. John Maddicott taught at the University of Manchester and was a Fellow and Tutor in Medieval History at Exeter College, Oxford, from 1969 until 2006.

Covering an exceptionally long time span, The Origins of the English Parliament takes readers to the roots of the English state's central institution, showing how the more familiar parliament of late medieval and early modern England came into being and illuminating the close relationship between particular political episodes and the course of institutional change.

The book is attractively written and fully documented

The Origins of the English Parliament 924-1327, J. R. Maddicott (Oxford University Press, 2010) xv, 526pp. It has been usual to ascribe the beginnings of Parliament of the late thirteenth and early fourteenth centuries. The book is attractively written and fully documented. There is a list of abbreviations, a particularly extensive bibliography and equally fine index. It is modestly priced as well. It deserves to become a classic.

workings of the Irish parliament and government. This article considers the origins of Quaker lobbying activity in the 1690s, and takes some case histories from the Quaker lobbying committee's minute-book. Justice and Grace: Private Petitioning and the English Parliament in the Late Middle Ages.

Maddicott’s book is clear, well argued, and well organized and it is based on a thorough knowledge of the full range of relevant primary sources .

Maddicott’s book is clear, well argued, and well organized and it is based on a thorough knowledge of the full range of relevant primary sources and of secondary literature. It is the very best kind of constitutional history, which manages to tell the story of the development of a major political and constitutional institution over time by relating that development to contemporary political events while also bearing in mind the rather different trajectory of institutions of a similar kind elsewhere in western Europe and the need to explain why the English parliament.

Автор: Maddicott J R Название: Origins of the English Parliament, 924-1327 ISBN: 0199585504 ISBN-13 .

Reflecting over a quarter-century of work on parliamentary sources, the book highlights the influence of Parliament, positive and negative, direct and indirect, on foreign policy and politics. It also has great contemporary relevance as we consider the effectiveness of democratic states when confronting authoritarian rivals, and the rights of representative bodies to be consulted before wars are launched.

This book describes the evolution of the English parliament from its earliest origins in the late AngloSaxon period. J. Maddicott, author Emeritus Fellow and former Tutor in Medieval History, Exeter College, Oxford Author Webpage. Starting with the national assemblies which began to meet in the reign of King Æthelstan (924–39), it carries the story of those assemblies through to the fullyfledged parliament of lords and commons which sanctioned the deposition of Edward II in 1327.

Over the four hundred years covered by the book the chief business of the assembly was always the discussion of national affairs, together with other matters central to the running of the state, such as legislation and justice. It was always a resolutely political body. But its development was also shaped by a series of unforeseen events and episodes. Chief amongthese were the Norman Conquest, the wars of Richard I and John, and the minority of Henry III.

John Robert Lewendon Maddicott, FBA, FSA (born 22 July 1943) is an English historian who has published works on the political and social history of England in the 13th and . The Origins of the English Parliament, 924-1327.

John Robert Lewendon Maddicott, FBA, FSA (born 22 July 1943) is an English historian who has published works on the political and social history of England in the 13th and 14th centuries, and has also written a number of leading articles on the Anglo-Saxon economy, his second area of interest. Born in Exeter, Devon, he was educated at Worcester College, Oxford. He has written a biography of Thomas, 2nd Earl of Lancaster, and one on Simon de Montfort, 6th Earl of Leicester.

Covering an exceptionally long time span, in this book J. Maddicott takes readers to the roots of the English state's central institution, showing how the more familiar parliament of late medieval and early modern England came into being and illuminating the close relationship between particular political episodes and the course ofinstitutional change

The Origins of the English Parliament is a magisterial account of the evolution of parliament, from its earliest beginnings in the late Anglo-Saxon period. Starting with the national assemblies which began to meet in the reign of King AEthelstan, it carries the story through to the fully fledged parliament of lords and commons of the early fourteenth century, which came to be seen as representative of the whole nation and which eventually sanctioned the deposition of the king himself in 1327. Throughout, J. R. Maddicott emphasizes parliament's evolution as a continuous process, underpinned by some important common themes. Over the four hundred years covered by the book the chief business of the assembly was always the discussion of national affairs, together with other matters central to the running of the state, such as legislation and justice. It was always a resolutely political body. But its development was also shaped by a series of unforeseen events and episodes. Chief among these were the Norman Conquest, the wars of Richard I and John, and the minority of Henry III. A major turning-point was reached in 1215, when Magna Carta established the need for general consent to taxation -- a vital step towards the establishment of parliament itself in the next generation. Covering an exceptionally long time span, The Origins of the English Parliament takes readers to the roots of the English state's central institution, showing how the more familiar parliament of late medieval and early modern England came into being and illuminating the close relationship between particular political episodes and the course of institutional change. Above all, it shows how the origins of parliament lie not in the late thirteenth and early fourteenth centuries, as has usually been argued, but in a much more distant past.

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