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» » The Knight in Medieval England 1000-1400
The Knight in Medieval England 1000-1400 e-book

Author:

Peter R. Coss

Language:

English

Category:

History

Subcategory:

Europe

ePub size:

1943 kb

Other formats:

doc lrf azw lit

Rating:

4.9

Publisher:

Sutton Pub Ltd; 1st edition (May 1, 1993)

Pages:

256

ISBN:

0750900598

The Knight in Medieval England 1000-1400 e-book

by Peter R. Coss


The Knight in Medieval England, 1000-1400 (Medieval Military Library). A knight must have a lady, but while many books have been written about medieval women, few have focused on the knight’s female counterpart in society.

The Knight in Medieval England, 1000-1400 (Medieval Military Library). 0938289772 (ISBN13: 9780938289777).

Coss, Peter R. Publication date. List of illustrations - Acknowledgements - 1. Introduction - 2. The origins of knighthood in England - 3. Angevin knighthood and its transformation . 150-c.

April 24, 2019 History. The knight in medieval England, 1000-1400 Close. 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. Are you sure you want to remove The knight in medieval England, 1000-1400 from your list? The knight in medieval England, 1000-1400. Published 1993 by Alan Sutton in Phoenix Mill, Far Thrupp, Stroud, Gloucestershire, Dover, NH. Written in English. Civilization, History, History, Military, Knights and knighthood, Military History.

The Knight in Medieval E. .has been added to your Cart. Beginning with the Conquest and the introduction of the feudal system, they were the ruling class by virtue of arms, though Coss also examines the Saxon roots of some aspects of knighthood

The Knight in Medieval E. Beginning with the Conquest and the introduction of the feudal system, they were the ruling class by virtue of arms, though Coss also examines the Saxon roots of some aspects of knighthood. He also considers in some detail the relationship of the knight first to gentility and then to lordship, showing how the characteristics of knighthood were changed in the process. The book's only fault, in fact, is the lack of subject headings in the index. 5 people found this helpful.

Coss, Peter Knight In Medieval England 1000-1400 (Medieval Military . 2. The Knight in Medieval England, 1000-1400 (Medieval Military Library).

Coss, Peter Knight In Medieval England 1000-1400 (Medieval Military Library). ISBN 13: 9780938289777. Knight In Medieval England 1000-1400 (Medieval Military Library). For those interested in the visual splendor of knighthood, the book is extensively illustrated with medieval seals, sculptures and manuscripts, including over 100 coats of arms in full color. - Explanation of the relationship of the historical knight to the fictional knight of Piers Plowman, Canterbury Tales, and other literary works.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for The Knight in Medieval England 1000-1400 by.Used-like N : The book pretty much look like a new book.

Used-like N : The book pretty much look like a new book. There will be no stains or markings on the book, the cover is clean and crisp, the book will look unread, the only marks there may be are slight bumping marks to the edges of the book where it may have been on a shelf previously. Read full description. See details and exclusions.

Starting with the forgeries of the Paston family to claim long knightly descent, and point out the elements that would develop . A cniht was more a servant than a soldier in pre-Conquest England; the very word derives from "boy.

Starting with the forgeries of the Paston family to claim long knightly descent, and point out the elements that would develop until then. Beginning with the lowly starting status. And in Normandy, miles were attached to manors just as serfs were in deeds. Discussion of the great or noble knights, versus the lowly and rustic ones

Both books will make valuable tools for teachers and students of these subjects, although the price of the second will put it beyond most students' pockets.

Bypassing the chivalric and romantic ideals of knighthood, Cross (history, U. of Northumbria, England) examines the actual practice of knights and their role in society. He traces the origin of knighthood in the late Saxon and early Anglo-Norman period, how it changed over the course of the centuries, and how it related to lordship, gentility, and military service. Well illustrated. Annotation copyright Book News, Inc. Portland, Or.
RuTGamer
The most important idea that I found in this excellent study was how few knights there actually were in England. Normal histories suggest that the knight was the most powerful and important figure in medieval England after the king. But Coss reviews the data and suggests that there were only 4,000 to 5,000 knights between 1066 and 1181.The following century the number of knights dropped to about 2000. By 1308 there were perhaps only 1,100 knights in England and by 1430 there were less than 200.

This decline in the numbers of knights was the reverse of the population. Cicra 1066 there were about 1,500,000 people in Wales and England. By 1300 the population had increased to 3,750,000, but the number of knights had dropped from 5,000 to 1,000. While population dropped after the Black Death by about one third to 2,500,000 in 1400, the number of knights dropped by four fifths to 200.

This decline in the number of knigts reveals the crisis of knighthood in England. With rising prosperity, the middle class came to usurp the powers of the knights, while at the same time, they refused to take up the arms of the knights. Between 1000 and 1400, knighthood dwindled away in England. For a detailed description of this change, read Coss' book.
Opithris
The author is an academic specialist in English medieval social history, with a special interest in knighthood and the gentry, and this volume is best read as a pair with his subsequent _The Lady in Medieval England_ (1998). While few knights in the medieval period became aristocrats, all noblemen were knights, at least in theory. Beginning with the Conquest and the introduction of the feudal system, they were the ruling class by virtue of arms, though Coss also examines the Saxon roots of some aspects of knighthood. He also considers in some detail the relationship of the knight first to gentility and then to lordship, showing how the characteristics of knighthood were changed in the process. The book's only fault, in fact, is the lack of subject headings in the index.

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