ComicsChildrenHumorFitnessReferenceITLawCookingHobbiesTeachingSelf-HelpPhotoFantasyHistoryTestsCalendarsFictionLGBTTeenagersTransportMemorisMedicineMysteryRelationshipsPoliticsBusinessSpiritualityRomanceBiblesMathSportTravelOtherNo category
» » Houma (LA) (Images of America)
Houma (LA) (Images of America) e-book

Author:

Thomas Blum Cobb and,Mara Currie

Language:

English

Category:

History

Subcategory:

Americas

ePub size:

1740 kb

Other formats:

doc rtf azw lit

Rating:

4.7

Publisher:

Arcadia Publishing (October 25, 2004)

Pages:

128

ISBN:

0738516317

Houma (LA) (Images of America) e-book

by Thomas Blum Cobb and,Mara Currie


In their book, Cobb and Currie refer to them as "Houma's three wise me. Never were truer words spoken.

In their book, Cobb and Currie refer to them as "Houma's three wise me. What a lovely trip down memory lane. Authors Tommy Cobb and Mara Currie, with the help of the good citizens of the Houma, weave a remarkable story with historical photographs and anecdotes of this truly unique part of Louisiana.

Only 12 left in stock (more on the way).

Only 8 left in stock (more on the way). Only 12 left in stock (more on the way).

Part of the Images of America: Louisiana Series). by Thomas Blum Cobb and Mara Currie. Houma is a name derived from a tribe of Native Americans who settled in what is now Terrebonne Parish, or "Good Earth. The town's residents come from French, German, Italian, Scotch, and English ancestry; this mix makes for an interesting cross-section of cultures in a charming Louisiana community.

Authors and local residents Jim Campos, Bonnie Kelm, Dave Moore, and Tom Moore and the Carpinteria Valley Museum of History have joined forces to paint a picture of Carpinteria, La Conchita, and Summerland for this follow-up volume to Carpinteria, in the Images of America series. Campos, Kelm, and the Moores are all former educators. Series: Images of America.

Towards the end of her life, she visited America with her two daughters, where she was much feted.

I learned that exceptional women didn't worry about what people told them they could not do, they used their intelligence and their energy and changed the world. Towards the end of her life, she visited America with her two daughters, where she was much feted.

Only 13 left in stock (more on the way).

In addition to local industry, the town's homes, churches, schools, events, and people are highlighted within the pages of Images of America: Houma.

Houma is a name derived from a tribe of Native Americans who settled in what is now. In addition to local industry, the town's homes, churches, schools, events, and people are highlighted within the pages of Images of America: Houma.

Marie Curie, Polish-born French physicist, famous for her work on radioactivity. She was the first woman to win a Nobel Prize. Why was Marie Curie important? Marie Curie’s contributions to physics were immense, not only in her own work, as indicated by her two Nobel Prizes, but also through her influence on subsequent generations of nuclear physicists and chemists.

Marie Skłodowska-Curie ‒ she used both names ‒ was a trailblazer in more . The Skłodowska-Curie couple became overwhelmingly popular.

Marie Skłodowska-Curie ‒ she used both names ‒ was a trailblazer in more than just science. More than ever, her strong principles and ground-breaking ideas are worth discovering, particularly for what she can teach us today. Radium became a magical object authors wrote books about, such as Paul d’Ivoia’s La course au radium (The Chase For Radium) or Raoule Marquis’ Radium Cave. Vanity Fair devoted a long article to their life and work and published a famous caricature with Pierre looking like the Statue of Liberty.

Houma is a name derived from a tribe of Native Americans who settled in what is now Terrebonne Parish, or "Good Earth." The town's residents come from French, German, Italian, Scotch, and English ancestry; this mix makes for an interesting cross-section of cultures in a charming Louisiana community. Fifty miles southwest of New Orleans and easily accessible from U.S. Highway 90-"The Old Spanish Trail"-Houma is also bisected by the Intracoastal Waterway. It has been dubbed the "Venice of North America," because it is the epicenter of six bayous, all of which were at one time tributaries of the Mississippi River. Houma and the surrounding communities have become internationally known for an abundance of seafood, including dried shrimp. The process of drying shrimp is truly unique, as it is only done in this area of the country. Indeed, a dried shrimp packing plant still operates on Main Street in downtown Houma. The production of sugar and other agricultural products, and later the oil industry, also played major roles in Houma's rich history. In addition to local industry, the town's homes, churches, schools, events, and people are highlighted within the pages of Images of America: Houma.
Nafyn
EXCELLENT
Morlunn
I bought this book for my wife. She is from Houma. I read the book and looked at the pictures and found it interesting as regards the area, the cajun people, and especially the pictures in there of the blimp base (I have been trying to find any picture of the blimp base for a long time). My wife has gone though the whole book a number of times, but still looks through the book often. She loves this book.
Nilabor
It had to be good....a keeper for my family.
Bulace
I have reviewed quite a few titles so far in this excellent series, and this one lives up to the high standards the others have set. The author's family have been Houmeans (Houm-ites?) for several generations and his own journalistic background comes out in the easy style of the text. Joseph Hache settled in the Houma area before 1803 (as confirmed by the U.S. government in 1823), and Terrebonne became one of the most heavily settled rural areas in the world, with farmers and timbermen (mostly northern slaveholders) in the north and trappers and fishermen in the south, who had arrived from the Gulf. Houma, built at the juncture of six waterways, was incorporated in 1834 and quickly became the parish seat. The arrival of the railroad in 1872 assured cheap shipping of sugar and seafood to outside markets, and the arrival of large numbers of Protestant oil field workers in the 1920s and `30s meant frequent intermarriages and a tradition of religious tolerance. Cobb begins his pictorial coverage with the town's centennial celebration in 1934, which included the dedication of a new City Hall. Subsequent chapters cover civic and social leaders, the ordinary people of the community and the surrounding villages, the big snowstorm of 1958, the destruction caused by Hurricane Carla in 1961, the visit of President Nixon during the campaign of 1972, the construction of Higgins PT boats during World War II, and even the introduction of a shrimp-drying process to Houma in 1873 by Lee Yuen of Canton, China. The books in this series are fascinating browsing, even if you don't come from the town depicted.
Мох
Personally I think that this book should have focused more on pictures of the area - buildings, businesses, places, landscape, etc. There are so many things I've heard my parents talk about and a lot of them are not in this book. There are far too many pictures of the same people/families, with a clear favoring of the Ellender family. At times I felt like this was just an Ellender family album. I do realize that the archives were a source for many of the pictures, but for a $20 book perhaps there should have been more research done and contributions from other families should have been solicited, accepted and used.

e-Books related to Houma (LA) (Images of America)