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» » Great Smokies: From Natural Habitat To National Park
Great Smokies: From Natural Habitat To National Park e-book

Author:

Daniel S. Pierce

Language:

English

Category:

History

Subcategory:

Americas

ePub size:

1150 kb

Other formats:

azw lit lrf lrf

Rating:

4.6

Publisher:

Univ Tennessee Press; 1st edition (August 16, 2000)

Pages:

280

ISBN:

1572330767

Great Smokies: From Natural Habitat To National Park e-book

by Daniel S. Pierce


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He also discloses the unfortunate human cost of the park's creation: the displacement of the area's inhabitants. The new preface chronicles developments in the park since the book's original publication in 2000. Over the past decade and a half. has been added to your Cart.

In this book, Daniel S. Pierce examines land use in the Smokies over the centuries, describing the pageant of peoples who have inhabited these mountains and then focusing on the twentieth-century movement to create a national park.

Daniel Pierce, The Great Smokies: From Natural Habitat to National Park (Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 2000), 29. ^ Michael Frome, Strangers In High Places: The Story of the Great Smoky Mountains (Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 1994), 110-111. Great Smoky Mountains National Park - official site.

Pierce, Daniel (2000). The Great Smokies: From Natural Habitat to National Park. Great Smoky Mountains National Park Trail Map - Large file i. df format. Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press. p. 19. ISBN 978-1621901648. Tricorner Knob Shelter - Information on the back country shelter near Mt. Guyot's southern slope.

Daniel S. Pierce is professor of history at the University of North Carolina, Asheville, US. e is the author of Real NASCAR: White Lightning, Red Clay, and Big Bill France, and Corn from a Jar: Moonshining in the Great Smoky Mountains.

Seeking a taste of unspoiled wilderness, more than nine million people visit the Great Smoky Mountains National Park each year. Yet few probably realize what makes the park unusual: it was the result of efforts to reclaim wilderness rather than to protect undeveloped land.

Great Smoky Mountains National Park Ma. Afternoon: This afternoon, we will visit the Deep Creek entrance of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park where we will complete a loop hike to see three different waterfalls.

Great Smoky Mountains National Park Map. by National Geographic Maps. A durable, detailed map of the North Carolina national park, shown at a scale of 1:70,000. The Great Smoky Mountains, A Visual Journey. by Deedee, Lee Mandrell. Recommended Adventures. Along the way, we will stop to learn about the local flora and fauna. The trail begins gently as it follows Deep Creek upstream.

In the things history nerds get excited about category: Working on the coffee table book on Southern Utah and the Arizona Strip this morning I came across this wonderful description of Bryce Canyon from Clarence Dutton of the . Geological Survey from his 1879 report on his two-year exploration of the High Plateaus of Utah: Bryce kindles enthusiasm in the dullest.

The great smokies: From natural habitat to national park. Knoxville, TN: University of Tennessee Press. Habitat suitability models and the shortfall in conservation planning for African vertabrates. Pimbert, . & Pretty, J. N. (1995). Redford, K. Robinson, J. & Adams, W. M. (2006). Conservation Biology, 19, 1488–1497. CrossRefGoogle Scholar. National parks: The American experience (3rd e.

Great Smoky Mountains National Park Trail Map - Large file i.

Seeking a taste of unspoiled wilderness, more than eight million people visit the Great Smoky Mountains National Park each year. Yet few probably realize what makes the park unusual: it was the result of efforts to reclaim wilderness rather than to protect undeveloped land. The Smokies have, in fact, been a human habitat for 8,000 years, and that contact has molded the landscape as surely as natural forces have. In this book, Daniel S. Pierce examines land use in the Smokies over the centuries, describing the pageant of peoples who have inhabited these mountains and then focusing on the twentieth-century movement to create a national park. Drawing on previously unexplored archival materials, Pierce presents the most balanced account available of the development of the park. He tells how park supporters set about raising money to buy the land often from resistant timber companies and describes the fierce infighting between wilderness advocates and tourism boosters over the shape the park would take. He also discloses the unfortunate human cost of the park s creation: the displacement of the area s inhabitants. Pierce is especially insightful regarding the often-neglected history of the park since 1945. He looks at the problems caused by roadbuilding, tree blight, and air pollution that becomes trapped in the mountains natural haze. He also provides astute assessments of the Cades Cove restoration, the Fontana Lake road construction, and other recent developments involving the park. Full of outstanding photographs and boasting a breadth of coverage unmatched in other books of its kind, The Great Smokies will help visitors better appreciate the wilderness experience they have sought. Pierce s account makes us more aware of humanity's long interaction with the land while capturing the spirit of those idealistic environmentalists who realized their vision to protect it. The Author: Daniel S. Pierce teaches in the department of history and the humanities program at the University of North Carolina, Asheville, and is a contributor to The Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture."
Narder
This book provides a good history of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. The subtitle tells you Pierce's emphasis: he sets the stage with some natural history and then moves to the battle to create the park. This campaign stretches across several chapters and makes up the meat of the book. He concludes with one chapter on the management of the park after establishment, and a conclusion that reflects on the park that we have today.

That capsule summary also lays out the main contrast with Margaret Brown's _The Wild East_, another history of the park that I recommend. Brown is more interested in the people of the region, especially the Cherokees and white mountaineers that lived in the Smokies before park establishment. She also tells us about how the Eastern Band Cherokees related to the park, and ended up profiting from it. In contrast, Pierce puts much greater emphasis on the political and legislative history of park establishment, and on the fundraising campaign to raise money to buy the park land. While Brown talks of the lumbermen, Pierce tells us of the timber companies and their fight against the park.

I recommend both books, but your choice of which book to read first really depends on your purpose (or interest). I hope the preceding paragraph helps.
Mavivasa
I found this book on the history of how the GSMNP came to be very interesting.
Efmprof
Just read this book and it was an interesting read. Good backgound on the struggle to make the Smokies a National Park (I am glad they did).

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