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» » Route 15: The Road to Hartford (CT) (Images of America)
Route 15:   The Road to Hartford  (CT)   (Images of America) e-book

Author:

Larry Larned

Language:

English

Category:

History

Subcategory:

Americas

ePub size:

1746 kb

Other formats:

mbr mobi docx rtf

Rating:

4.6

Publisher:

Arcadia Publishing (July 31, 2002)

Pages:

96

ISBN:

0738510483

Route 15: The Road to Hartford (CT) (Images of America) e-book

by Larry Larned


Hartford is an old New England river city separated from its eastern neighbors by the Connecticut River.

Hartford is an old New England river city separated from its eastern neighbors by the Connecticut River. With the opening of the Merritt Parkway in 1940 and construction of the Wilbur Cross Parkway inviting traffic from Boston and New York.

Start by marking Route 15: The Road to Hartford (Images of America: Connecticut) as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Dec 18, 2015 Ann rated it really liked it. This book is fascinating reading, especially for a transplant to Connecticut. The history of the development of interstate and intrastate roads is quite interesting. As autos replaced earlier transportation our road systems had to change. The Merritt Parkway was a leader in road design & opened in 1940.

Hartford is an old New England river city separated from its eastern neighbors by the Connecticut River Images of America. With the opening of the Merritt Parkway in 1940 and construction of the Wilbur Cross Parkway inviting traffic from Boston and New York, the Connecticut legislature realized a new river bridge at Hartford would be a must for local and through traffic.

Hartford is an old New England river city separated from its eastern neighbors by the Connecticut River

Hartford is an old New England river city separated from its eastern neighbors by the Connecticut River. This became a reality in 1942, when the Charter Oak Bridge was opened to traffic.

Route 15: The Road to Hartford presents images from his forty years of collecting and documenting Connecticut roadside culture, architecture, and engineering. Studies conducted during the late 1920s and early 1930s indicated serious traffic congestion between New Haven and Hartford on .

Chatham Railroad Museum · archives. The US highway system is complex with at least three parameters to consider

Chatham Railroad Museum · archives. The US highway system is complex with at least three parameters to consider. The first is ownership which includes but is not limited to Federal, State, County, Local and toll road usually owned by an authority: Semi-public) The second parameter is Functional Classification(its operational characteristics) including arterial, major and minor collectors and local. The third is funding source-Federal Aid being the biggest.

There are currently two very narrow, single-lane ramps between CT-15 and I-91, which can cause traffic bottlenecks extending over a mile south on I-91 due to long lines of. Larned, Larry (2002). Route 15: The Road to Hartford.

There are currently two very narrow, single-lane ramps between CT-15 and I-91, which can cause traffic bottlenecks extending over a mile south on I-91 due to long lines of drivers trying to merge between CT-15 and I-91. These ramps will be replaced with wider, two-lane ramps that will reduce bottlenecks along I-91 northbound and CT-15 southbound. The state will also widen the CT-15 expressway east of the Charter Oak Bridge from four lanes to six. This will effectively improve connections between I-91 and I-84 as a bypass of downtown Hartford.

Route 15. The Road to Hartford. series Images of America

Hartford is an old New England river city separated from its eastern neighbors by the Connecticut River. Route 15. series Images of America.

Hartford is an old New England river city separated from its eastern neighbors by the Connecticut River. With the opening of the Merritt Parkway in 1940 and construction of the Wilbur Cross Parkway inviting traffic from Boston and New York, the Connecticut legislature realized a new river bridge at Hartford would be a must for local and through traffic. This became a reality in 1942, when the Charter Oak Bridge was opened to traffic. By 1948, the system of roads and highways numbered Route 15 was completed, with Hartford as its focal point. The character of the three Connecticut parkways, the Berlin Turnpike, the Hartford Bypass, and the Charter Oak Bridge is described in Route 15: The Road to Hartford.

Highway historian and retired highway engineer Larry Larned, author of Traveling the Merritt Parkway, has appeared in television and radio interviews speaking about Route 15 and the nation's early roads. Route 15: The Road to Hartford presents images from his forty years of collecting and documenting Connecticut roadside culture, architecture, and engineering. His detailed account of the road to Hartford includes personal recollections of traveling Route 15 as a youngster and studying the details along the way-the tollbooths, the bow-tied gas station attendants, the families on picnics at rest stops.

Simple fellow
This is a quick local history book, mostly made of historic photos presenting Route 15 in Connecticut, which is known in Fairfield County as the Merritt Parkway, in lower New Haven County as the Wilbur Cross Parkways, and points north of Meriden as the Berlin Turnpike. I found it interesting seeing local landmarks, such as the West Rock Tunnel, and the Charter Oak Bridge under construction.
fetish
The Berlin Turnpike and Merritt Parkway were very busy and offered a lot of services prior to Interstate 91 being built. The book showed only a small portion of its true activity. I wanted to read and see much more.
Mezilabar
Consider "Route 15" a follow-on to Larned's 1998 "Traveling the Merritt Parkway." It covers more ground, both geographical and chronological, but offers a similar mix of historical information and vintage photographs for road buffs and car buffs.
Larned starts with the Merritt Parkway: a bit of an overlap with the earlier book, but I didn't notice anything duplicated. Also covered is the Wilbur Cross Parkway (which was lightly treated in "Merritt") and Berlin Turnpike. There are some nice photos of the short-lived Connecticut River Boulevard (which I hadn't heard of until reading "Route 15") and a good treatment of the construction of the Charter Oak Bridge.
East of the bridge, the Wilbur Cross Highway gets a few pages; perhaps this 1950s road will be highlighted in "The Road to Boston" :-)
If you have read "Traveling the Merritt Parkway", here's how "Route 15" compares: Same layout; narrative driven by historical photos; generally ordered from south to north as you read. There's a bit more written information here than in "Merritt". There's a little more roadside culture, especially in the Berlin Turnpike section, and Larned diligently identifies all the classic cars you'll see in the photos. Like "Merritt", "Route 15" is made for skimming or reading straight through. There's no index, but given the geographical organization, its 128 pages are not that much to search through.
For Connecticut roadgeeks, this book's a keeper, and we want to see more from this author. But "Route 15" should also hold interest for car buffs, historians, and even commuters wondering what the roads were like decades ago, and how they ended up where they are now.

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